which oil should you cook in vis a vi... - Advanced Prostate...

Advanced Prostate Cancer

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which oil should you cook in vis a vie cancer?

Darryl profile image
DarrylPartner
26 Replies

Some fats keep you alive #shorts

youtube.com/shorts/Kl0nw2LA...

26 Replies
dhccpa profile image
dhccpa

I tend to add oil after cooking rather than cook with oil. Primarily olive oil, but I've used others.

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to dhccpa

Make sure your olive oil is from one country and not a combination of many areas. This information will be on the back of the bottle. I prefer Italy.

dhccpa profile image
dhccpa in reply to Miomarito

I tend to buy the brand recommended by Consumer Lab.

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to dhccpa

Dhccpa, what brand do they recommend, and the cost?

dhccpa profile image
dhccpa in reply to Miomarito

California Olive Ranch. About $15 for, I believe, a pint.

Justfor_ profile image
Justfor_ in reply to Miomarito

A significant portion of Greek olive oil is exported to Italy.

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to Justfor_

does that information have to be listed on the bottle?

BanjoPicker profile image
BanjoPicker in reply to Miomarito

It is US law that country of origin is displayed on the label. All olive growing regions can and do produce good oil. It is labor intensive and costly, but worth it. Labor availability has become a big problem. Too many countries solve that problem by allowing the fruit to over-ripen on the tree, waiting for abscission to permit the olives to easily be shaken to the ground and be harvested by sweepers. Over-ripe olives lose their anti-oxidants, healthy attributes, and flavor. Over 80% of the worlds’ olives are harvested post-peak. Don’t be fooled!!

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to BanjoPicker

good post.. if I were ever to get a tattoo it would say “ancoro imparo”!

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to BanjoPicker

Ok what’s the bad news I see picked by mechanical means🤷‍♀️

Olive oil.. finding this thread of comments interesting and helpful!
BanjoPicker profile image
BanjoPicker in reply to Miomarito

“Solely by mechanical means” refers to the oil extraction process. The olives are mechanically crushed, mechanically malaxed, and mechanically decanted. No heat or chemicals used.

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to BanjoPicker

ok Banjo I’m guessing my oil from Italy is pretty good🙏

BanjoPicker profile image
BanjoPicker in reply to Miomarito

Your oil is from Bari. It is most likely oil from the Coratina cultivar, a robust varietal. That varietal is currently under attack from a bacterium called Xylella. In 2013, scientists at the University of Bari identified the bacterium as the cause of an unusual disease outbreak in olive trees. Since then many groves of mature trees have been bulldozed and burned. You should be paying a big premium for this oil. It should be good oil if the importer is not playing some blending games to build inventory.

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to BanjoPicker

are u kidding me… and it tastes great too! Lol I have 3 bottles. Banjo, well then, on a happier “note” it sure reminds me of Italy.

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to Miomarito

My husband takes at least 2Tbs per day. Oh God, I may be poisoning my one true love.

BanjoPicker profile image
BanjoPicker in reply to Miomarito

Relax Miomarito…You have good oil. Make sure you use your newly opened bottle within 3 months. Look at the package dates. Don’t use oil 2 years past its milling date.

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to BanjoPicker

bango, I am reading about it now, PBS also ran a special on it. Interestingly, I remember I could not get it for a year and wondered why. I also did not question the lower price because it is a brand of Costco.

When I was visiting Ireland I went to a maple syrup farm. One of the owners told me that they supply syrup for Costco. Told me Costco made them an offer that is hard to refuse. It is the exact same syrup that you would pay a lot of money for in another store. This is why I never questioned Costcos great price for the Bari oil Ok Banjo, I’m liking your tune much better now!

Mio

BanjoPicker profile image
BanjoPicker in reply to Miomarito

I know the buyers at Costco. They are sophisticated buyers and are to be trusted. They do a good job sourcing legitimate oils from reputable sources. When they couldn’t source Italy they moved to Greece to get good oil. Came back to Italy the next year. Tasted different because of varietal change but they were still sourcing top tier oil.

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to BanjoPicker

Banjo, yessss for one full year it was oil from Greece, maybe more! Also their coconut oil is the best I’ve seen. Delicious, clean, good price, as these are the only two oils I use.

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to Miomarito

I meant Banjo, not Bango...this just, oh my goodness I'm laughing! I have been in my office way too long today! my secret is I have renamed everyone to my liking but don't worry, you will not be Bango!

Justfor_ profile image
Justfor_ in reply to Miomarito

I am not certain about what the rule is in Italy. I presume that it must be like here in Greece where if there is a specific mention of geographical origin on the label it is controlled down to the prefecture. For example, Messinian olive oil can be from Kalamata, Pylos, Methoni, Koroni etc, but not from adjacent Sparta that falls into the neighbouring prefecture of Lakonia. PDO (protected designation of origin) legislation is applicable. Else, a mix originating from all over the country is allowed.

Same thing happens with honey.

BanjoPicker profile image
BanjoPicker

I am a big fan of Extra Virgin Olive Oil. After all, it is simply cold pressed fruit juice. Always look for fall harvested (northern hemisphere) and quickly pressed to insure that the olives were picked at the peak time when the polyphenols are abundant. Cooking with high quality EVOO has been proven to be preferred as long as you don’t fry above 405 degrees Fahrenheit. A word of caution…As much as 80% of the olive oils with commonly marketed brand names are substandard and are no better than refined seed oils. Choose carefully !! I prefer California EVOO’s with the COOC (California Olive Oil Council) seal. Much of Italy’s export olive oils are imported, mostly from Spain, and packaged in Italy.

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to BanjoPicker

Banjo, good post. Reading labels are so important.

Nusch profile image
Nusch

I wonder that coconut oil is promoted here. There are many studies available that coconut and palm oil are unhealthy oils. Please provide evidence for this statement

Currumpaw profile image
Currumpaw

Thank you for the post Darryl. Here are some links you may want to access about oils.

___________________________________________________________________________________________

When does heating olive oil become "carcinogenic"?

nutritionandcake.com/when-d...

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Excerpts from the above link:

"When does heating olive oil become carcinogenic is a topic of conversation I hear too frequently. The media (including social media platforms) seem to be fear mongering the population into thinking that cooking with olive oils are bad for our health and “carcinogenic”. You have probably heard phrases like, “Extra virgin olive oil should only be used as a dressing because when it is heated it becomes toxic” and “cooking with coconut oil is the best as it has the highest smoke point”. However, this is not what the research suggests."

"Research published in 2018 by Acta Scientific Nutritional Health found that when compared to other popular cooking oils, extra virgin olive oil was the most chemically stable after heating at high temperature. In addition, despite being exposed to extreme high heat it was still safe to consume. The tests consisted of a 20-minute frying at 240C and a 6 hour deep frying at 180C.

In both tests extra virgin olive oil came out on top with the most stable of all oils and produced the lowest number of by-products such as free fatty acids. Coconut oil and other virgin oils such as avocado oil came close behind for stability and smoke point."

Note that the year of the study was 2018.

A nine-year-old study more or less agrees with Dr. Espinoza's view of olive oil but with a twist. The link is below.

________________________________________________________________________________________

Extra Virgin Olive Oil Loses Health Benefits When Heated, So Save …

medicaldaily.com/extra-virg......

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An excerpt:

"Olive oil's health benefits derive from high concentrations of monounsaturated fat, which comprise about 70-80 percent of the oil's total fat. Due to its low smoking point, around 375 degrees Fahrenheit, olive oil's key phenols, which work as antioxidants to preserve heart health, begin to degrade at high heats.

This degradation has led researchers to recommend lower-cost oils for cooking and reserve olive oil for dressing and taste. Periodically incorporating olive oil into the food as it's being prepared can offset the compound's degradation, they added."

I find it interesting that it is recommended to use inferior oil when heating it for cooking. One is already starting out with less than the best. The slogan made famous by the IT folks comes to mind--"Garbage in, garbage out".

I almost exclusively cook my own meals. I understand that chefs in restaurants need to quickly prepare meals, hence, the heat is often higher than I would ever cook at.

Another link below in which dieticians and nutritionists speak about oils and a list of "smoke points". This article is recent and was published in 2020. I prefer fresh information. The author and reviewer are two RDN's whose educations and backgrounds are focused on nutrition and it's impact on health.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Cooking Oil Smoke Points: High, Low, and Why It Matters

verywellfit.com/smoke-point...

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An excerpt:

"A cooking oil's smoke point refers to the temperature when the oil starts to smoke—which it will reach before its boiling point. Heating oils past their smoking point has been linked to the formation of carcinogens and can also create an off, burnt flavor."

__________________________________________________________________________________________

The smoke points of various oils.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Smoke Points of Different Oils

Oil Smoke Point

(degrees F) Best Used For

Refined avocado oil 520F Deep-frying, searing, stir-frying

Refined or light olive oil 465F Grilling, sautéing, stir-frying

Refined peanut oil 450F Deep-frying, stir-frying

Ghee or clarified butter 450F Sautéing, stir-frying

Corn oil, sunflower oil, safflower oil 450F Sautéing, searing

Refined coconut oil 450F Sautéing, stir-frying

Refined sesame oil 410F Stir-frying

Canola oil 400F Baking, grilling, sautéing

Grapeseed oil 400F Sautéing, stir-frying

Extra virgin olive oil 375-400F Baking, salad dressing, sautéing

Duck fat, chicken fat, lard 375F Baking, frying, sautéing

Vegetable oil 400F Baking, deep frying, roasting, searing

Unrefined virgin avocado oil 375F Roasting, searing, sautéing

Unrefined virgin coconut oil, unrefined sesame oil 350F Sautéing

Unrefined walnut oil, unrefined peanut oil 320F Drizzle for salads and vegetables

Walnut oil 300-350F Drizzle for salads and vegetables

Butter 300F Baking, searing

_________________________________________________________________________________________

I like to use coconut oil for pancakes. It's taste doesn't enhance Italian dishes but rather detracts from the enjoyment of it.

Thank you for the post. It shows that getting the food into and out of the pan quickly by using a high heat can harm the health benefits that some oils have.

Currumpaw

NecessarilySo profile image
NecessarilySo in reply to Currumpaw

Olive oil breaks down and increases trans fats when heated high temp or repeatedly reused for frying. I use soybean oil for frying.

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