Please help with results and right direction si... - Thyroid UK

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Please help with results and right direction sign post

sandralemon
sandralemon

Hi everyone this is my first time posting

I have received my results from Medi checks with doctors comments but I read previously to post them online anyway

Results seems to indicate that my thyroid range is all within the normal parameters however my inflammation markers is almost off the charts at 17.51.

while I am relieved results indicate normal thyroid function I feel still in limbo as I just feel dreadful all the time.many thanks in advance for your help interpreting these results

8 Replies
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SeasideSusie
SeasideSusieAdministrator

sandralemon

while I am relieved results indicate normal thyroid function

Well, they're within the range but they're not indicating normal thyroid function. A TSH of 3.35 would get you a diagnosis of hypothyroidism in another country, whereas the UK make you wait until it reaches 10. And your Free T4 (free thyroxine) is very close to bottom of range. Your thyroid is struggling.

ActiveB12 at 79.6 isn't bad, but as anything below 70 would warrant testing for B12 deficiency, then I would want mine a lot higher in the range.

Folate at 2.97 (2.91-50) is dreadful. It should be at least half way through it's range so you need to improve that. Eat lots of leafy greens and other folate rich foods, also supplementing with Thorne Basic B which contains 400mcg methylfolate raised my folate from very bottom to very top of range in 2.5 months.

Vit D at 28.1 means that you should be on loading doses. See NICE treatment summary for Vit D deficiency:

cks.nice.org.uk/vitamin-d-d...

"Treat for Vitamin D deficiency if serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels are less than 30 nmol/L.

For the treatment of vitamin D deficiency, the recommended treatment is based on fixed loading doses of vitamin D (up to a total of about 300,000 international units [IU] given either as weekly or daily split doses, followed by lifelong maintenace treatment of about 800 IU a day. Higher doses of up to 2000IU a day, occasionally up to 4000 IU a day, may be used for certain groups of people, for example those with malabsorption disorders. Several treatment regims are available, including 50,000 IU once a week for 6 weeks (300,000 IU in total), 20,000 IU twice a week for 7 weeks (280,000 IU in total), or 4000 IU daily for 10 weeks (280,000 IU in total)."

Each Health Authority has their own guidelines but they will be very similar. Go and see your GP and ask that he treats you according to the local guidelines or this summary and prescribes the loading doses, do not accept a prescription for 800iu, check before you leave the doctor's room. Once these have been completed you will need a reduced amount (more than 800iu so post your new result at the time for members to suggest a dose) to bring your level up to what's recommended by the Vit D Council, the Vit D Society and Grassroots Health - which is 100-150nmol/L - and then you'll need a maintenance dose which may be 2000iu daily, maybe more or less, maybe less in summer than winter, it's trial and error so it's recommended to retest once or twice a year to keep within the recommended range. You can do this with a private fingerprick blood spot test with City Assays vitamindtest.org.uk/

Your doctor wont know, because they are not taught nutrition, but there are important cofactors needed when taking D3 as recommended by the Vit D Council -

vitamindcouncil.org/about-v...

D3 aids absorption of calcium from food and K2-MK7 directs the calcium to bones and teeth where it is needed and away from arteries and soft tissues where it can be deposited and cause problems.

D3 and K2 are fat soluble so should be taken with the fattiest meal of the day, D3 four hours away from thyroid meds.

Magnesium helps D3 to work and comes in different forms, check to see which would suit you best and as it's calming it's best taken in the evening, four hours away from thyroid meds

naturalnews.com/046401_magn...

Check out the other cofactors too.

Whilst seeing your GP about your Vit D level, mention your raised CRP level as well. Ask him to repeat that and if it's still raised then to investigate.

Don't start all supplements at the same time, stagger them. Start with one, give it 2 weeks, if no reaction then add the next one, give it 2 weeks, if no reaction add the next one, etc. That way if you do have an adverse reaction you will know what caused it.

First thing to do is optimise your vitamins and minerals. Give it a few months - maybe 4 - then retest and see where they lie, and see if it has helped your thyroid levels. You don't need reverse T3 so you can go for the cheaper Thyroid Check UltraVit.

Thank you so so much firstly with the promptness of your reply and also for the signpost on where to go next because honestly I think I’m going mad

The advice so freely given on this forum is invaluable and so helpful I have made an appointment to see my GP next Tuesday the 31st it will be a videoed appointment so I hope they are prepared to see a half crazed lady demanding answers which have not been forthcoming despite seeing every ologist going to try and get to the bottom of why I feel the way I do .

I am going to order the supplement which you recommend and also try to eat more green leafy veg I say try because I have about 6 to 8 portions of broccoli spinach cabbage et cetera every day

Again thank you for your advice it actually makes me feel very emotional and bewildered as to why so many of us feel the way we do but are not getting the help we need through our national health service

Hi Sandra, As always very good advice from Seaside Susie. It's unfortunate that doctors not only in the UK have little idea how to treat hypothyroid patients. You really should start learning everything you can about this condition. It is usually an autoimmune problem with gluten being an antagonist so it starts in the gut and that is why you have such low nutrient levels. Healing the gut is imperative so you can extract nutrients from your food. It would help to use digestive enzymes and/or Betaine HCL which adds acid which your stomach may not be able to produce with all the inflammation you have.

stopthethyroidmadness.com/l...

sandralemon
sandralemon
in reply to Heloise

My cousin who was diagnosed with hypothyroidism a year ago sent this book to me and I started reading it at the weekend. it is illuminatin to say the very least. she also sent me books by Dr Mike Starr and Dr broda barnes.she lives in Canada and had to go to Arizona to see Dr Mark Starr before she was diagnosed and now is feeling so much lighter not only in her weight but her thoughts and general well-being thank you so much for your reply the support on this site is invaluable. Off to do more reading!

I feel all the years of taking anti inflammatory medication and anti biotics have played a significant part in my current condition x

Heloise
Heloise
in reply to sandralemon

I'm so happy that you are motivated to learn. This means you are going to feel better if you can put these things into practice. The diet is important although whether it is Paleo or autoimmune diets, it has to be right for you. If you look at the BIG picture though, it comes down to your nervous system and getting out of the sympathetic state (fight or flight). Cortisol has something to do with this as it tries to compensate for the low or high thyroid. Relaxation techniques of some sort can be very helpful.

Heloise
Heloise
in reply to sandralemon

Ray Peat is an old-timer who came before some of our newer experts who are also wonderful. Their you tube videos are great like Mark Starr. I like John Bergman for his knowledge of anatomy and body function.

This could be a useful reference tool. raypeat.com/articles/articl...

my inflammation markers is almost off the charts at 17.51.

This may be small comfort, but a CRP of 17.51, although obviously high is not off the charts. I saw a program on TV a few months ago where a doctor used a CRP test to determine if a woman with a chest infection needed antibiotics. Her CRP was 50.

This is something that disturbs me about all blood tests including my own. If something is over the range I don't know what a serious level would be. Some things might not be really serious until they are 100 times the top of the range, other things may be serious as soon as they breach the top of the range. And I don't know which is which.

That actually is a comfort as the chart only went as high as 20 so 17.51 appeared tremendously high. Thank you very much for that information. It gives me more perspective

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