taking thyroid medication

why is it that the Japanese have a daily limit of iodine 20 times higher than UK-US values

How much iodine do you need to take? What other nutrients support the uptake of iodine?

What foods drinks medications prevent uptake of iodine?

What are the bests sources?

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The normal Japanese diet.... which is heavily weighted to seafood .... results in an intake of approx. 10 - 12 mgs of iodine per day. Many folks are prejudiced against iodine but... every cell in our body has receptors for iodine. Iodine is also taken up, preferentially, by the thyroid gland first, then the breasts, ovaries, uterus, prostate gland etc then the rest of the body.

Iodine belongs to the chemical family called halides. Chlorine, fluorine and bromine also belong to this same chemical family. When we don't ingest enough iodine, these other halides will occupy those iodine sites on our cells. So, if you ingest fluoridated water, swim in chlorine pools or drink chlorinated water, eat bread or baked goods treated with bromide, you probably can't absorb much iodine even if you are taking it by supplement.

The best sources of iodine are seafood then supplements. One brand of the liquid form of iodine is called Lugols. You want the 5% or 2% Lugols. Iodoral or I-throid (made by RLC Labs, the same folks who make WP and Naturethroid thyroid rx) are trusted brands of the solid capsules/tablets. Whatever you do, don't... repeat.... don't ingest the iodine that is available at your druggists or pharmacists that are meant for external use (to treat boo-boos) only.

As always, keep an open mind but do do your due diligence, homework and research. Also do read up on the history of iodine usage. A hundred years ago, it was considered a miracle drug.

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No bromide in UK (or European) baked goods, BTW, but plenty of chlorine and fluoride in most areas.

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I recently posted an abstract which suggest that the 10 - 12 milligrams a day consumption reported for Japan is far higher than reality - suggesting perhaps 3 milligrams a day.

This Japanese paper is clearly questioning how much iodine can be consumed safely:

Iodine Excess as an Environmental Risk Factor for Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

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Also relevant to Japanese iodine consumption:

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/261...

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I can only reply based on my personal experience and I certainly don't recommend that others do as I do but they do need to make informed decisions.

I have been stable on my thyroid meds dosage for almost twenty years but still experienced cold hands/feet/nose and was heat and cold intolerant.... nothing life changing but an inconvenience. Each time that I tried to increase my NDT dosage, I would get heart palps.

I had taken low dose iodine for several years with no change in these 'inconvenient' residual hypo symptoms when I read several doctors' research and recommendations for higher doses of iodine. I did so, taking companion nutrients and extra salt in order to minimize detox symptoms (the iodine will start 'kicking out' the other halides and sometimes the body can't keep up). My heart palps resolved as well as body temp/coldness/temperature intolerances.

My daily iodine dosage varies between 12.5 mgs to 25 mgs and I have increased my NDT from 90 mgs x day to 120 mgs x day.... feel great and no more coldness. yipeeee.. I had few detox symptoms but my exposure to other halides is minimal. I live out in the country so I have well water, don't eat commercial breads/bakery goods and no pool. When I first increased my iodine, I experienced vague headaches but extra, natural salt took care of those.

Again, one should do their own research.

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Your experience is your experience and I make no comment on that other than to hope you remain at least as well as you are.

I just wanted to make it clear that there are some very uncertain figures about the iodine content of Japanese diets and some recent papers have called into question some of the higher figures that have often been quoted.

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Helvella.... you are perfectly proper in warning folks about iodine or anything else that comes to your attention. We can't have eyes and ears everywhere, right? We need to know the good, the bad and the ugly of anything that we contemplate putting in or on our bodies.

That is why I always stress that people need to do their own homework and not just blindly follow other folks advice or actions... not without doing their own research and knowing all the facts or.. as many facts as they can find. When it comes to supplements and natural protocols it can be the 'wild, wild west' and way too many shysters are all too ready to part us from our hard-earned money with little regard for the consequences.

I am a breast cancer survivor... going on 12 yrs now. And you wouldn't believe how many 'cures' there are out there..lol... I managed with surgery only and natural supplements to keep the beast at bay but I know how easy it is to be persuaded to try something when you are literally scared out of your mind and how many unscrupulous people are all too ready to take advantage.

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Did you know that 1 in 3 women who are diagnosed with

breast cancer have a form that the body is able to deal with

on its own. And yet they are given chemo and radiation.!!!

"Breast cancer over-diagnosis results in unnecessary treatment for one in three"

just enter this headline in the address bar and it should

take you to an article by Sarah Boseley at the Guardian.

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Much easier to click a link. :-)

theguardian.com/society/200...

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much easier

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We should all do our homework of course. It is known that for some causes of hypothyroidism iodine should not be administered. It is also well documented that excessive iodine intake causes Transient Hypothyroidism and Iodine induced goitre, which can be reversed by lowering iodine consumption. The iodine issue isn't cut and dry, it's very much based on the individual and condition.

Both my sister and I take Levo, we each have different conditions leading to our hypothyroidism, her formulation of Levo actually includes iodine as an active ingredient, whereas my Levo from the some pharmaceutical company contains no iodine and my doctors have told me to use sea salt and other salts which don't contain iodine. I believe once you have Hashi's it's not advised, especially not in excess.

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I think you are correct about using iodine if you have hashis. Using selenium with hashis is supposed to help stabilize the conversion of T 4 to T 3 as well as to help lower antibodies but... who knows. It is so varied from individual to individual and condition to condition.

As for excess.... I am chicken and have never dosed more than 25 mgs and my usual daily is 12.5 mgs. At some point, one will be at saturation levels of iodine and just excrete the excess in the urine.

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Personally I don't know about iodine dosages. Were you given this dose by a doctor? I just ask because to me 12.5 mg seems very high, but like I said I know nothing of iodine used for treatment.

One thing I will mention about selenium however is that I was on the standard 200mcg dose for 2 months, during which time I went from being in the middle of the range for selenium to far over range. My test results showed that I hit levels of toxicity. My tests also revealed that after this selenium experiment my antibodies doubled, I also got incredibly sick during this time.

So I had a pretty bad experience with selenium, now I'm stuck with super high antibodies and I'm not sure how to bring them down. Unfortunately selenium doesn't work for everyone which is why it's important to always get blood tests to see what's going on, and how any side-treatment is affecting your thyroid levels and antibodies (if you have Hashi's or graves).

From my own research I theorized that selenium actually treats a pre-cursor to Hashimoto's, for example Epstein Barr virus. The selenium might have a direct effect on such a virus or bacteria, therefore lowering the attack on thyroid and lowering antibodies. However there are so many things that could lead to hypothyroidism or auto-immune responses. I personally tested positive for Yersinia, and as I said had an "opposite" reaction. That is my belief as to why selenium doesn't work for everyone. But I'm still compiling a lot of research right now on this subject and am pretty much at the beginning stages so don't take my word for it (yet) hehe.

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"Selenium doesn't work for everyone"

There could be many reasons why selenium doesn't seem to work...

what test are you applying in what circumstances?

is there only one form of selenium? and do all forms have the same uptake and reactions?

maybe a couple of Brazil nuts would give you

the daily recommended dose of selenium.

preferably if it comes in its shell. Apparently

the nut starts to lose its value as soon as it is taken

out of its shell.

good luck with your researches...the way to go.

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I am histamine intolerant and can't eat nuts. The tests I'm talking about are blood tests, I had my blood taken before starting selenium and after 2 months. Each test included selenium, TSH, ft4, FT3, antibodies, along with other vitamins and minerals.

There are several forms of selenium, I took yeast free selenomethionine, the recommended form, for me it has to be yeast free again due to my Histamine intolerance.

I was already perfectly mid range before starting selenium, without nuts, breads, wheats, or the usual high sources of selenium.

I'm now working at fixing my gut issues and eventually seeing if another round of selenium would work, but I would take 100mcg as 200 was way too much for me.

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It has been a few years since I did my research on iodine. A good book to read is "

Iodine : Why You Need It, Why You Can't Live Without It"

by Dr,

David Brownstein. I also belong(ed) to several iodine groups on FB and yahoo.

From interacting with folks in these groups and reading/researching, I have found that my 12.5 mgs is a very modest dosage compared to some. There are those intrepid souls who routinely take 100 mgs of iodine every day.

Selenium is usually well tolerated by most of us but, as with everything, there are exceptions. You might find this article (Part I) interesting.

jeffreydachmd.com/hashimoto...

Part II

jeffreydachmd.com/hashimoto...

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I just read the links. They're interesting but don't really explain much. They say that selenium deficiency has a correlation to high antibodies.

However selenium deficiency is quite uncommon. I was perfectly halfway in range without supplementation. This article also states that in most patients antibodies were reduced by 30% in 3 months, but they don't explain what happened to the other patients. Like I said I had a 100% increase in antibodies in 2 months, but that could have been due to other factors...

It seems like selenium supplementation is necessary for those who are deficient, but should be treated with caution otherwise.

By the way if you're interested here is a food list that shows how much selenium is in different foods:

ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/S...

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Do you need iodine if the whole of the thyroid gland has been removed?

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When you do your research, you will find that there are receptors on every one of our cells... all in the body... for iodine. Iodine is taken up, preferentially, first by the thyroid gland, then the sex organs and then the rest of the body. So, iodine is not just for the thyroid gland.

I am not here to tell anyone to take or not to take iodine but it seems obvious that, with the cell receptors for iodine, it is a crucial element. Now, how much? There is much discussion on this point.

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Taking selenium alongside iodine supplementation is in fact crucial in securing a possitive effect.

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That has been my understanding also, Simba. Some knowledgeable docs even recommend starting selenium a few weeks before beginning an iodine regimen. Selenium is supposed to be protective of the thyroid gland. Again, folks need to research and decide for themselves.

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All levo contains iodine, or else it wouldn't be thyroid hormone. 1 molecule of T4 has 4 atoms of iodine. 100 mcg T4 contains 65 (l think) mcg iodine.

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is it naturally sourced say from seaweed of synthetically sourced?

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correction or synthetically sourced.

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I have no idea, I'm afraid.

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What I meant is that her formulation has iodine itself as an added ingredient. There is a difference between iodine on its own and an iodine atom making up part of another molecule. Levo's forumlation can also be different for example synthroid: C15H11I4NO4, but I take l-thyroxin from SANOFI which is sodium based: C15H10I4NNaO4. (If you want to know I did environmental chemistry in university, I grew up in pharmaceutical labs as both my grandparents were pharma chemists)

But that is a much more complicated subject for another post :)

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Well, I've only ever done chemistry at schoolgirl level, but I cannot imagine a type of levo that has extra iodine. It wouldn't be T4 anymore - god knows what it would be! What is the brand name of her levo? I would like to do some of my own research. :)

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It's made by Henning/Sanofi. We have all sorts of weird Levo mixtures here in Germany I've noticed. I believe it's called l-thyroxine + jod ? I can't find our next time I see her

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OK, so why is she taking that? Sounds like a recipe for disaster, to me.

Oh, meant to say, you do know that excess iodine can trigger Hashi's, don't you? Another good reason not to over-indulge!

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Sorry I replied in 2 posts. I mentioned that she doesn't have Hashi's and I believe it was given to her to reduce her nodules.

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Were her nodules causing her problems, then? I've never heard that iodine reduces them. Everyone has nodules.

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From what I understand her nodules are causing her problems. She's not really savvy to ask questions with her doctor, she doesn't write down what they tell her, which leaves me always guessing. I remember when I first saw her medication I looked into it and saw some references to the reduction of nodules, and she mentioned that's why it was prescribed (but she didn't seem so sure). I looked at her results and she didn't really seem "so" hypo (TSH under 2 without medication and FT3/4 in range). She also has something with her vocal cords and they want to do surgery to remove the nodules there too. They say its caused by smoking and the fact that she's always yelling (she works in nightclubs with loud music).

I've been left to piece it together, I wish I could talk to her doctors but she doesn't involve me.

Are you sure that everyone has nodules? I've done 3 ultrasounds to check for nodules at 3 different clinics and each time I had none.

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Well, most people have them, whether or not they are hypo. People usually develop them at some point in their lives.

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Found an interesting link: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/1...

"Thyroid nodules are common and are commonly benign....Nodule incidence increases with age, and is increased in women, in people with iodine deficiency..."

The article both shows that most have nodules (I didn't know that so thanks for the knowledge 😉) and also that iodine deficiency is a cause for nodules. I know she had been getting her nodules checked for years and they were growing, she wasn't put on Levo until last year. My guess is that they must have checked her iodine along with her thyroid levels and wanted to correct both things with one pill?

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Iodine deficiency might be a reason for nodules developing, but that's not to say that taking iodine will reverse them. It all sounds a bit iffy, to me.

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Should have said, taking iodine didn't get rid of mine! I still have them.

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Yea I'm in the dark about her treatment. All I know is she has nodules and doesn't have Hashi's. I saw her results and they weren't overly hypo. I believe they gave her the Levo based more on her symptoms (tired and weight gain) rather than her results. Maybe the iodine is to keep the nodules from getting worse. She's been avoiding quitting smoking or taking a break from work to recover for years, she's too afraid to have an operation, so this might be the most the doctor was able to do?

When i was diagnosed with Hashi's she went to be doctor to get her thyroid checked too, in case it was genetic. She had already know of the nodules for many years. Her results were all negative, but in some strange way she was disappointed because she was hoping for a reason to her symptoms. I believe she pushed the doc into prescribing 50mcg Levo for her, but he was always more interested in treating her nodules in some way or another.

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You don't happen to have a copy of her results, do you? Saying they were all negative, is so vague as to be meaningless. She must have had a TSH, and it may have been in range, but it's where in the range it falls that is important - to those that know anything about thyroid, that is. Which rules out most doctors!

She could still have Hashi's. One negative antibody test does not rule it out, because antibodies fluctuate. Also, did she have both types of antibodies tested? One can be positive, and the other negative, but you still have Hashi's.

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I don't have her results. She had all thyroid antibodies tested, they were both well under range. Her TSH was around 1.7-1.8 if I remember correctly when she was given Levo. Now it's down to 1.2 on 50mcg.

If I remember correctly her FT3/4 was right in the middle of the range. What I remember most is being surprised that she was given Levo with her results. I don't think doctors here would normally consider Levo if TSH is under 2, she is however privately insured and goes to an "upscale" clinic.

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Oh, well! That makes all the difference. But, as I said, you cannot rule Hashi's on the basis of one negative test.

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I understand. I imagine that if she did have Hashi's and it had progressed far enough that some damage would have shown up on the ultrasounds she's had, hopefully a doctor would catch it and mention it. I know on my ultrasounds it's clear as day. I think/hope she doesn't have it.

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So I believe I was mistaken after all 😓 hehe. The extra ingredient is actually Potassium Iodide (I remembered it as Iodine). Sorry for the confusion, I believed for the past year it was Iodine.

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Still sounds weird.

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Found this article that explains it, titled "Levothyroxine and potassium iodide are both effective in treating benign solitary solid cold nodules of the thyroid."

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/7...

Like I said, it's to treat her nodules ;) I don't think it's that weird. They're really good at treating thyroid here in Germany, after all Dr. Hashimoto's research was funded in Germany and he made his discovery of auto-immune thyroiditis here :)

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Yes, well, I'm sure that lots of other research has been done in lots of other countries, doesn't mean that all the endos in those countries know what they're doing. I've heard from other people in Germany that thyroid treatment is just as dire as it is anywhere else.

But, I know nothing about her case, so can't really comment.

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I'm from Canada, my experience is between these two countries and I've had a better experience here in terms of general health care. I'm probably one of the members you've heard complaining as of course there are still problems. I'm not really trying to argue which country has better health care, I wouldn't know that answer. I'm just trying to say; her doctor is treating her nodules with that medication. And I was just clarifying that it was in fact Potassium Iodide for the purpose of this thread. That was all I was trying to say 😊

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Yes, I understand. :)

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It is still T4, the iodine is just an extra ingredient. It doesn't change the composition of the Levo itself. I believe she was given it due to her nodules. She doesn't have Hashimoto's like I do.

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Interesting one.

My Thyroid problems are nothing compared to most on here (& I'm a male in good condition), BUT... I did have a few symptoms & TSH up to 11, with T4 & T3 bottom of range. I was eventually diagnosed Hypo by NHS.

My own trials of NDT went badly! Tried 5 times. Immediate adverse reactions.

The NHS Thyroxine didn't cause the reactions NDT did, but did nothing. Blood tests showed I didn't convert it at all. (I seem to convert my own T4 quite well, but not extraneous).. I ditched it.

I tried T3 for a few months. Can't say I felt much. Hard to say, because I'm not Ill like many here...

So about 7 months ago, I ditched the lot & started taking 12.5mg Iodoral every morning. I feel absolutely fine.

I've had an NHS blood request from my GP sat there for ages. I'll go do it, see what my results look like.

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Yes be very interested to know. I strongly suspect that I was short of iodine years ago and itcwas suggested I took kelp, I still do. Also I don't have antibodies. Just been treated from breast cancer completely out of the blue so again literature I've read suggests that can be lack of iodine. But it can be a can of worms as opinion seems divided.

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I'll try get in the the blood test next week. Will definitely report back.

My understanding is that breasts require Iodine, just as the Thyroid does. Have a read of that Dr Brownstein stuff. Loads of video of him on YouTube.

Kelp tablets will only give you micro dose. Iodoral tablets come in 12.5mg & 50mg. Lugols is much cheaper, but Iodoral is more convenient.

My own view on the negative press towards Iodine is it comes from a mix of the propaganda from the pharma industry & the association with Radioactive Iodine. It stands to reason that the "R" word is the bad boy in that mix. The Iodine merely carries it to the target...

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And, from people who have been made ten times worse by being prescribed iodine by ignorant doctors without any form of testing.

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Well that statement works both ways of course, I.E., without testing how do we know it was the Iodine that caused the deterioration?

I remember one pearl from a lady who swore of adverse effects of Iodine, because she was sick following an evening out involving Oysters. So nothing to do with the gallon of Champagne & Brandy then....

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No oysters, no brandy, no champagne, just a steady deterioration in health, and increase in hypo symptoms over the following months - weight gain, terribly heavy and painful periods, developing tinnitus, hair-loss, etc. Too obvious to be a coincidence.

But you obviously think that anyone who says anything against iodine is a moron - your remark about the oysters was insulting in the extreme - so I won't say anymore.

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Oh dear....

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Iodine must be taken with the co factors that make it

work properly.

On youtube you can see lots of videos on thyroid-iodine

etc and read the comments for a really good idea

of whats right for you.

good luck

phoenix 230002 is on the right track

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Well, I'm certainly not considering taking it. I wouldn't touch it with a barge pole. Besides, my iodine is extremely high, just from taking thyroid hormone replacement.

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Porter5, the comments section on YouTube is probably not a good place to be getting your information and treating your health 😓

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the comments section on you tube may be very informative or not depending on what use you can make of the information.

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It's a good starting point to do one's own research. But shouldn't be considered as research itself

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Or taking iodine without selenium....

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Knackersyard, there is good reason with a lot of empirical evidence that iodine is detrimental to people with Auto-Immune thyroiditis. You have to understand that the thyroid does in fact need iodine just like you say, a lack of iodine is known to cause hypothyroidism, an excess of iodine is very well documented to cause transient hypothyroidism and iodine induced goitre which is reversible by lowering iodine consumption. But in those with Hashimoto's for example our thyroids are actually not the problem it is our immune system and antibodies which drives the destruction of the thyroid causing hypothyroidism. Which is why it's important for people with auto-immune thyroiditis to not intake iodine as we attempt to suppress the thyroid activity to find a balance in treatment. Iodine in such cases often causes complications with dosing and speeds up destruction.

I'm not sure I've ever seen iodine propaganda from any pharma corp, but if you know of this I would love to get the links so I can add it to my research.

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are all iodine medications the same? some argue that synthetic are

not just useless but positively dangerous!!

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This is something I wouldn't know much about to he honest as I don't take iodine myself, so I haven't learned much about the specific medications.

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Iodine is iodine. There is no such thing as synthetic iodine.

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naturally sourced or syntheticaly sourced is the correct way of describing types of iodine.

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OK, I learned something new then, thanks.

Was just thinking that an element couldn'the be synthetic .....

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Some do well on iodine and it improves their health. For you it has worked well which is great btw.

Unfortunately it's not that simple for all as there seem to be so many variables. In theory we could say maybe you didn't have thyroid issues in the beginning at all , maybe it was secondary to for example bacterial infection/parasites/leaky gut in which case iodine cleared it being such a potent antibacterial.

Not saying this is the case but could be.

I wish we had better ways to determine and test who truly benefit from iodine, who tolerate it and to whom it's not an option. There probably are dozens or hundreds of different genetic mutations that affect whether we tolerate iodine or not or do we need it as if the system is failing and your thyroid gland is not trapping iodine then you get worse and worse.

Mine doesn't seem to like even little iodine even though I do not have antibodies. I have begged and asked nicely but no , my thyroid gland refuses to take iodine in large quantities. It makes me feel very ill. My thyroid gland looks perfectly healthy so nothing malicious going on. It just politely refuses to take more :D

On the other hand I am a bit histamine intolerant and iodine seems to be histamine liberator so it's rest of my body that rejects it in that case.

If you managed to fix your thyroid issues by iodine I envy you as that is the simplest way!

I hope your blood test results show good numbers so it really is fixed. Please tell us if you get tested!

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are you taking the co factors absolutely essential for proper functioning?

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Yeah did it by the book.

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Do you take selenium as well?

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yes selenium is necessary. Do consider when taking any tablets or medicatios, are they natural or synthetic? Are they the right type at the right dose?

Have a look at Dr Brownstein's video's on YouTube.

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Thank you for this video knackersyard. I am on NDT and have been advised to take Bladderwrack to counter parasites. I was worried about the iodine content but it seems that it should be OK from this video - and it would be good to get rid of the nasties.

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What do you mean by "take"?

It’s also important to note that it’s not safe to take bladderwrack by mouth.

medlineplus.gov/druginfo/na...

Of course, this is very much a standard medical establishment view. Though that does not of itself mean that it is either right or wrong.

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Thanks for the link helvella. I had a hair analysis thru Bionetics recommended by the Naturopath and this is a herbal remedy for parasites and it is in capsule form.

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perhaps because of where it comes from? It may be contaminated with environmental pollution?

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That's why I said can of worms as I feel we have to have all the facts and know our levels before taking that step. Some people say must and others say quite the opposite so I think is needs lots of individual research than taking a blanket view.

And thanks for the above comments. I've already got the iodine just trying to find the best way to get tested as there are varying agendas with that as well!

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Biolab.co.uk (not used so can't comment) do 24 hours urine sample. Don't know whether Genova, BH or Medichecks do it.

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Forgive my ignorance , but how do you do a 24 hr urine sample ? .

I seem to remember doing one when first diagnosed and I had to do it in a huge plastic thing full of foul smelling chemicals .😕

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Pinkpeony For the Genova test you collect your urine over a 24 hour period, pee into your own jug or something then transfer into a collection bottle they provide. There's nothing smelly in the collection bottle. You store it in the fridge during the 24 hours collection time.

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Thanks S Susie , presumably it's a smallish container lol Pp

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I think it's a one litre container (maybe a bit more). They send two so you mix them if you pass more, then you remove the correct amount with a pipette and discard the rest.

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Thanks for that Susie .

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Many thanks for that. I've heard 24 hour urine is the most reliable but not heard of anyone who does it.

I've used Genova for bloods in the past so was wondering if they did one though hadn't noticed it but there again I was t looking for it then!

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I have had iodine urine done three times. It doesn't tell whether you are deficient or not, it only reflects iodine consumption during past few days prior testing. If you happened to eat food high on iodine then it can look like your iodine consumption is sufficient.

You need thyroglobulin tested as well as it reflects iodine consumption during past months. If you are deficient ,non iodinated thyroglobulin leaks into blood

You need also TT4 as that is usually low in iodine deficiency even though your ft4 is normal.

If you started to supplement just before urine test your iodine might look very low as your body absorb more after being deficient so it might look like you are severly deficient even though your were just moderately deficient.

This is why iodine urine loading test often fails. You take large quantities of iodine before test and it might look like you are excreting little and are very deficient. Besides some is excreted in stool!

One can get tested and get some sort of idea whether they are deficient or not but the only way to really know is to supplement some.

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trial and error. An experimental attitude is necessary. Diet, allergy,

medications,pollution, co factors may all need to be considered.

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Here's a long and boring article to answer your question:

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

Long story short they eat a lot of seaweed which is high in iodine, making them by far the most iodine consuming country in the world. They also have high incidence of thyroid problems, most likely due to their incredibly high consumption of iodine.

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And here is a quote from the long and boring article:

"Transient hypothyroidism and iodine-induced goiter is common in Japan and can be reversed in most cases by restricting seaweed intake [16,29,48-52]."

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And the article assesses average consumption: we estimate that the Japanese iodine intake--largely from seaweeds--averages 1,000-3,000 μg/day (1-3 mg/day).

Certainly more than the UK and the USA - but not the 10 - 12 mgs of iodine per day suggested earlier in this thread.

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They also mention their standards:

...the safe upper limit of 3 mg/day set by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare in Japan [12].

12 mg would be 4x the safe limit according to Japan's Ministry of Health.

(Sorry I'm on my phone and not sure how to italicize the quote)

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What about the cofactors? Doesn't seem like they are taken into consideration.

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I have written about cofactors in this blog. In fact that was a list from Dr Carolyn

Dean MD.

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Yes. I was thinking about the research in the japanese intake. If they did not take the cofactors into consideration the conclusion is not relevant.

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Which cofactors? I'm not sure I understand your question. This is an assessment, not a study itself. The assessment is based on multiple studies if you check the endnotes you'll see. I'm assuming the cofactors you're talking about would be present in those studies themselves. (If I understood the question, but I'm not sure I do)

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I don't trust research that concludes that iodine is harmful if i e the selenium intake has not been taken into consideration. Research (sorry, don't have any links at the moment) has shown that iodine causes hypothyroidism UNLESS you get selenium as well.

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Would love to see that research as I'm compiling a lot of my own research. If you can find the link please send it to me.

You might be interested to read some of my posts on selenium, as that is a huge topic of my research. I used myself as a guinea pig and had a completely opposite reaction on selenium vs the information present on this forum and online. (My antibodies doubled, I went into toxicity and got really sick, all from 200mcg for only 2 months) due to my experience I am really focused on selenium at the moment and I am getting ready to make some big posts on this forum.

By the way this research never concluded that iodine was harmful, what it said is that excess iodine causes certain thyroid conditions and this is well established, moreso it was trying to show how Japan has high levels of iodine due to intake of sea kelp, we're just using this assessment to draw our own conclusions on this forum.

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Down with a virus right now, will find it when I'm well again

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Thank you. Hope you get better soon!

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BTW, read that you don't get any iodine. Selenium and iodine work together and balance each other. Maybe that's the reason for your high levels of selenium.

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It could be!

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Cerebos is a salt with iodine added available from Waitrose(some outlets).

Apparently the iodine was added because of the widespread incidence of

what was known as "Derbyshire neck". a severe swelling of the neck...

but for some reason they have stopped adding it to their own brand of salt?

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Cerebos always used to produce both iodised and non-iodised salt - but I cannot now see any non-iodised salt under their brand in the UK.

Not sure why you say that Waitrose stopped adding iodine (in whatever form) to their own brand of salt? Most salt in the UK is not iodised. I'd be surprised if their ordinary salt had been iodised - though they might have stocked at least one iodised salt product under their own name.

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It sounds so complicated but thanks everyone for your input.

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Complicated... seriously you are not being kind to yourself. It may seem complicated

the first time you hear about these things but after a few exposures you know what to expect and take that information into account.

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