Foods detrimental in uptake of thyroxine?

thyroidmanager.org/chapter/...

Table 5

Cassava, lima beans, linseed, sorghum, sweet potato

Contain cyanogenic glucosides; they are metabolized to thiocyanates that compete with iodine for thyroidal uptake

Cruciferous vegetables: cabbage, kale, cauliflower, broccoli, turnips, rapeseed

Contains glucosinolates; metabolites compete with iodine for thyroidal uptake

Soy, millet

Flavonoids impair thyroid peroxidase activity

Also all poly-unsaturates seem to be aggressive on the thyroid and they appear to interfere with thyroid transport protein. Peanuts are also contra-indicated.

Above was taken from healthunlocked.com/thyroidu...

Would roasted peanuts also be detrimental?

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  • A peanut is a peanut is a peanut! lol

    No, seriously, the first part of the list are goitrogens and the list is woefully incomplete. What they do is impede the up-take of iodine by the thyroid gland. That was a bit clumsily explained, hope I've made it clearer.

    So, if you still rely on your gland for some of your hormones, these things could be a problem. It has nothing to do with the thyroxine you take orally.

    However, the good news is... not everybody is affected by all goitrogens! Some people aren't affected by any of them. But some people are affected by some of them. For instance, I was affected by pears, strawberries, walnuts, corn and soy. But not by the other things.

    Now there's a school of thought that says that cooking them destroys the goitrogenic elements. But whoever said that has never had a goitrogen attack. I can tell you that if you are sensitive to any of these foods, you can boil them for hours or roast them in a furnace, it won't make any difference to the way they make you feel.

    So, how do they make you feel? Like you've forgotten to take your hormone and caught flu at the same time! So, you'll know if they effect you. And as for roasted peanuts, the only way to know is to try some. Do raw peanuts have a bad effect on you? If not, I don't suppose the roasted ones will, either.

    Now, the only exception to the above rules is SOY. Soy is doubly bad because it does affect the thyroxin you take by mouth. It impedes its up-take at a cellular level. So, once again, makes you feel like you've forgotten you take your hormone, and/or makes you more hypo.

    I must confess I have no knowledge of the other things mentioned, flavonoids and poly-unsaturates. But if you would like to see a complete (we think) list of goitrogens, see here:

    healthunlocked.com/thyroidu...

    Hugs, Grey

  • I agree that it is very incomplete. I originally posted that as a quick response - referencing the similarly incomplete Thyroid Manager page.

    I am currently trying to take the information from Thyroid Manager and elsewhere and produce a much better "Things that affect thyroid hormone" document. There are many partial lists but the goitrogens seem to be far better recognised than the ones which have effects in other ways.

    Any contributions would be welcome - please send by Private Message to avoid bogging down this thread!

  • Goitrogens might be better recognised but they're totally misunderstood, in my experience. So many things I read where they just say 'oh, just ignore them'! Well, some people might be able to, but that advice might be causing a lot of unnecessary suffering.

    I'm afraid goitrogens are my only contribution. lol

    However, I will be very interested to see the finished work, as it's a vastly neglected area and could help people so much.

  • Hi Grey, thank you for your excellent contribution and the link to the list of goitrogens. I see in this list that peanuts are probably OK if roasted, which is great as I can carry on eating them without worrying. But need to buy better quality tea to avoid high fluoride!

  • Ummm sorry, but where in the list did you see that peanuts are probably ok if roasted?

    Did you read this bit?

    "Now there's a school of thought that says that cooking them destroys the goitrogenic elements. But whoever said that has never had a goitrogen attack. I can tell you that if you are sensitive to any of these foods, you can boil them for hours or roast them in a furnace, it won't make any difference to the way they make you feel.

    So, how do they make you feel? Like you've forgotten to take your hormone and caught flu at the same time! So, you'll know if they effect you. And as for roasted peanuts, the only way to know is to try some. Do raw peanuts have a bad effect on you? If not, I don't suppose the roasted ones will, either."

  • Hi greygoose, please access the link and note that next to peanuts in brackets: probably OK if roasted.

  • Yes, but didn't you read what I said to you about the idea that cooking things didn't really work? And didn't you see I asked you how you reacted to non-roasted peanuts and if you don't have a reaction to those then roasted would be ok? I put that in my last reply to you as well as the first. Did you read it?

  • Hi greygoose, I haven't a reaction to either and as the list stated that roasted peanuts are probably OK, gave me confidence to continue gorging myself on them.

  • Well, if you haven't had a bad reaction, than that's good, carry on!

    But the list wasn't written by Moses on the mountain top. Don't confuse it with the bible. lol

    As I said, people that write that sort of thing have never experienced a goitrogen attack. In other words, they don't really know what they're talking about. That's why I explained to you, carfully, that cooking probably wouldn't make any difference! Roasted is just cooked.

    I didn't realise that I'd left that bit in. I'll try and remove it.

  • Tried to change it but what told I don't have the required permission to perform that act!!! What the ... Don't have permission to change my own post??? Has this become a police state or what??? I'm furious!

    Sorry, nothing to do with you, cc120. lol

  • GG, it's probably a glitch. I've been told I don't have permission to submit my replies :o

  • lol Somebody up there doesn't like us! It's just very frustrating and I'm not known for my calm and patience! I'll try again tomorrow.

    Thanks Clutter.

  • Hi greygoose, thank you.

  • Before you go off eating loads of roasted peanuts...

    Roasted peanuts are more likely to trigger an allergic reaction than raw peanuts, according to an Oxford University study, involving mice.

    Scientists say chemical changes caused by dry roasting processes may prime the body's immune system - sparking future allergic reactions.

    But much more work is needed before humans should consider swapping roasted nuts for raw ones, they say.

    bbc.co.uk/news/health-29280451

  • Hi helvella, thank you. I've been eating bags of roasted peanuts (unsalted) for years and never had a problem. Never had an allergic reaction in my life.

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