In range results but symptoms relating to Hyperthyroidism

Id like some advice for my daughter please. She is 26 years old and like me, suffers with anxiety. My cure for the anxiety was once I started taking thyroid medication. I clearly had an underlying propensity to hypothyroidism but my TSH was always in range.

My daughter is very tiny regardless of how much she eats, always has been. She is very anxious and hyper and equally very slow depressed sometimes. We have often wondered about bipolar. She is on medication for depression but still gets some symptoms, most of the time.

She will lay in bed sometimes shaking and shivering. She is anxious and she keeps feeling sick.

As a family we have auto immune diseases which I am only beginning to understand.

I tested my own antibodies and they are extremely high indicating Hashimotos thyroiditis.

My daughter has had her thyroid tested and the results seem to not be indicating this but I can't bear to see her suffer. Is it possible she has high antibodies also and that she could be concealing hyperthyroidism at the moment. If she could only get the correct treatment it could change her life as it did mine with hypothyroidism.

Is it worth her asking to be tested again and that the doctor considers her condition to be bordering on hyperthyroidism? She has an appointment on Monday.

3 Replies

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  • It's possibly more likely early stage Hashimoto's when you can swing from hypo to hyper.

    As you suggest best to get thyroid antibodies checked. There are two sorts TPO Ab and TG Ab. (Thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin) ideally both need checking. NHS rarely checks TPO and almost never checks TG.

    Ask GP to also check levels of vitamin d, b12, folate and ferratin. These all need to at good (not just average) levels for thyroid hormones (our own or replacement ones) to work in our cells.

    Make sure you get the actual figures from tests (including ranges - figures in brackets). You are entitled to copies of your own results. Some surgeries make nominal charge for printing out.

    Alternatively you can now ask for online access to your own medical records. Though not all surgeries can do this yet, or may not have blood test results available yet online, but all should be doing this with couple of years.

    When you get results suggest you make a new post on here and members can offer advice on any vitamin supplements needed

    If you can not get GP to do these tests, then like many of us, you can get them done privately

    thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/testin...

    Blue Horizon - Thyroid plus eleven tests all these.

    This is an easy to do fingerprick test you do at home, post back and they email results to you couple of days later.

    Usual advice on this test, (home one or on NHS) is to do early in morning, ideally before 9am. No food or drink beforehand (other than water) don't take Levo in 24 hours before (take straight after). This way your tests are always consistent, and it will show highest TSH, and as this is mainly all the medics decide dose on, best idea is to keep result as high as possible.

    As you have Hashimoto's then you (and your daughter) may find adopting 100% gluten free diet can help reduce symptoms, and lower antibodies too.

    Best advice is to read as much as you can. Vitamin and minerals levels are very important, but standard NHS thinking, doesn't at the moment seem to recognise this. You will see, time and time again on here lots of information and advice about importance of good levels of B12, folate, ferritin and vitamin D, and also gluten intolerance.

    Good book explaining gluten and stress connections is "the immune system recover plan" by Susan Blum

  • Some of your daughter's symptoms look like hyperthyroid some like hypo. The easiest way to determine which she has is basal temperature - get her to take her temperature in bed first thing in the morning. If it is below normal she is hypo, if high she is hyper.

    When there is more than one close family member with thyroid issues there is a possibility of a genetic thyroid condition, often known as Thyroid Hormone Resistance. I think that I may have replied to you about this before. If not let me know.

  • There is a successful treatment for Thyroid Hormone Resistance, which was developed by Dr John Lowe in the USA. He had the condition himself and this drove him to research and find a solution. He took 150mcg of T3 once a day from about the age of 20 until he died in 2012 at age around 66 (he was in perfect health and his was an accidental death).

    With this condition some people have unusual thyroid blood results but for most people the results are in the normal ranges.

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