Bravery and Brilliance

Just been watching 2 programmes on channel five...The first one the Brain hospital where people undergo life saving brain operations. The strength of people truly amazes me along with the human body and its ability to heal. Not to mention the brilliance of the surgeons changing peoples lives.

The second programme was about a young woman who had a massive tumour growing inside her mouth...her courage and dignity was beyhond anything i have ever seen.

And again the skill of the surgeon was outstanding, what seemed impossible became possible,pure brilliance....

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  • It's a fab programme it really shows what people with brain injuries face and what personal barriers they face. I know as somebody waiting for my brain op it has help my family understand my thoughts and worries x

  • I wish you well and im sure you will be in very safe hands.

  • Thank you

  • I watched both those programmes, & they did help to put things in perspective for me, because i might think that life is hard, but at least I`m not facing the horrors that those people are.

  • yes it does that dosent it. It makes you realise that fairness does not come into it...its just how it is.

  • I've just had the pituitary brain op they showed last week. I watched it through closed fingers lol. Thank God we have some brilliant neurosurgeons, especially at Kings College in London where my op was performed. I'm 3 weeks post op and must admit to feeling very low and ill. All my hormones are playing up and I'm now on hydrocortisone as my own body is not producing any cortisol now. Anyhow, I can only get better eventually, just hope it's a quicker recovery period than I've been warned! Hugs, Laura xx

  • Well done, it must be weird watching someone going through the same as yourself,,weird but reassuring at the same time.

  • I was one of the world's first transsphenoidal pituitary tumour patients way back in 1976. No CT or MRI scans to help in those days of course,and they gave me 6 months and no children

    Shows how wrong they can be - we have a 29 year old daughter, and so far I've managed 38 years!

    Good luck with your recovery.

  • I watched the last series too, it was at the John Radcliffe in Oxford, this time its in Liverpool. Its the NHS at its best. Surgeons willing to take a risk when patients future at stake. Its a shame Endo's have not got the same bottle to prescribe NDT to patients whose quality of life might be improved.

  • I agree......maybe endo work is just not exciting enough for them...living with is not exciting either and we still deserve the best treatment we can get.

  • But just think how much their patients would love them if they dared to stick their heads above the parapet! But that clearly isn't an incentive! :-\

  • We've watched the series so far (and the previous series)as I had a pituitary tumour, just as a couple of patients have. Mine was diagnosed,removed through my nose and subsequently had radiotherapy before even CT scans were invented,back in 1976. No MRI guidance in those days! I was given about 6 months to live - which just proves the professionals are not always right. At the age of 19,knowing that serious brain surgery is your only hope, you do wonder why it's you. I had the,most amazing family to support me;I went out on my final teaching practice only 6 weeks after the surgery...my then boyfriend has now been my husband for over 35 years,and been through the pituitary fuss then,my thyroid in the early 90s and my sub-arachnoid haemorrhage last year...and still had time for us to have our daughter in 85. What a life so far!

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