cars

Chris was diagnosed a year ago and I have been focusing on practical changes [downstairs wet room, grab rails ] etc. He hasn't driven for a year and we still have a small and big car [ both old] ! They are low and he finds it difficult getting out. So I have to get my act together. He has always sorted out the cars. I have no interest in them and its another opportunity for learning ! I have given the big car to my son and need to buy a middle-sized one.

What cars would any-one recommend ? Is there any grant to help with adaptations ?

Thanks Jean

17 Replies

oldestnewest
  • Does Chris receive disability living allowance? If he was under 65 at diagnosis I think he should. If he does it solves a lot of problems as you can have a leased adapted motorbility car where the mobility part of the benefit pays for the car. Before we had our wheelchair adapted car, I had a Citreon Berlingo. They are easy to get into and with a light weight wheelchair to throw in the back, it worked well for two years but then came the time when I couldn't get Colin out of it any more. We now have a wheelchair adapted vehicle so he goes straight into the back, originally by winch but now sing an electric wheelchair. I opted for another Citreon Berlingo but there are similar models around. I asked people I saw in car parks with wheelchairs about their cars, pros and cons. I've had people speak to me the same.

    I hope you manage to find something suitable, thinking of the future as well.

    Nanna B

  • Hello Nanna , What sort of hoist do you have , Once you get used to it I am sure you will find it I valuable I did .

    Taking trousers on and off can be a nightmare but 8 have got it now .

    my husband cannot stand or walk anymore although this morning he asked for his walking stick . I found it and gave it to him to please him knowing he wouldn't be able to manage it , but it was lovley to hear him ask and he had thought he could get up .

    when he could rise I got the zimmer gphe onced used to no avail , under the circumstances he was very good and didn't get upset ..Not rise !

    I put my husbands trousers on while he is in bed after washing the bottom half .

    I put either leg in and raise them as high as possible asking him to slide his legs up , Then I roll him side to side and pull them up to his waist . I have already slid the sling down his back , I do this when he is sitting up with the help of his bed . He can lean forward to allow me to get this done .

    I attach the hoist to the sling and rais checking trousers are on comfortably .

    hoist on to his wheelchair which I push into lounges where we have another h list over his chair . Hoist off and onto his chair . He uses a wheelie commode chair . Which I hoist him onto while lowering the trousers from the back .

    I forgot to mention when putting the trousers on make sure you slide the legs up as far as you can before you put the sling under the thighs this helps when you pull the trousers up at the back . If we have an accident and the trousers becoMe wet I change them when on the commode but also makiNg sure you raise the trouser legs up as high on the thiGh as u comfortable can .

    Depending on how he is at the time of course makes a big difference . I do

  • I do quite a bit of huffing and puffing while doing so . lol While swearing at the same time .

    He doesn't wear pyjama bottoms anymore just the pad . and long socks they are nice and soft so help with any pressure on his heels .

    Hope at least some of that makes sense. good luck x

  • The hoist we have is not attached to the ceiling or walls it is portable .

  • At the moment we have a standing hoist as he can stand and has good strength in his arms to hold on. He can only walk if two people are holding him and I say, left right left right. If I don't say that, he doesn't move. I didn't think about how much was involved in transferring someone until I read your post. You just get on and do it don't you but reading it makes me wonder how we cope. I've discovered the bit about pulling his trousers up as much as possible. Because it is a standing hoist, I have to push his legs against shaped shin pads. On the first few occasions I strapped him to the pads only to discover his trousers round his ankles so had to unstrap him again. Colin wears short PJs and a convene. As you said, I'm sure I'll get used to it. Transferring is OK, just the undressing at the moment as I have help to do it during the week. I'm spoilt really, reading what others have to do alone all week. I nearly reached breaking point before help was given......and still have my moments!

  • this is such a nuisance everytime I religious in i come onto a different response . sorry ...

    Our bathroom is upsatairs wher we have a walk in shower and downstairs toilet is t suitable to turn into a wet room , such a shame . I try not to wheel him about too much because we still have carpet . high makes it heavy . if we have visitors I do wheel him into his bedroom dining room . then . do u think it would be easier on wooden floor . to use a wet room would have to have hoist. in there as well

    I have thought about knocking the wall down no between the porch and toilet

    I have the same problem when removing the bowl that is set in the commode chair . He often winces as I remove it . and I try not to hoist him too much . it cannot be very comfortable . because the toileting slings go under the armpit

    Be a lot easier for me if he was using pads all day but I don't want that for him and of course he doesn't go to the toilet to order and can be many times during the day . firtunatately not at night or rarely

  • I've removed all carpets and rugs but we do have parquet floors downstairs. When he was upstairs I also took up the carpet and it's just boards up there but it was a lot easier. I can well understand reluctance to use pads. I feel the same. Our wet room was our garage. It cost me all my lump sum pension but at least I was fortunate enough to have a lump sum.

  • Hi Jeam, where in the world are you!

    I faced the same problem last year, trying to drive two cars, was a pain, always one had a flat battery, or out of petrol!

    Traded S's car in, my baby had to go to its maker in the sky! Very sad. Any way, bought at Peugeot 3008. It will not allow for a wheel chair hoist. But for now it's easy for S to get in and out. High off the ground. There is a brilliant handle in the middle that he can pull himself in by. The boot is big, I can get S's wheelchair in easily, if I need to take, (only using it for convenience at the moment). It has a removable shelf, so it's great for putting the shopping in and getting out, no back breaking leaning over!!! It's east to drive,not too big, but comfortable.

    Sorry about the typing, just noticed I have spelt your name wrong, but as yet, HEALTHUNLOCKED have not fixed the fault, although I have complained and I know somebody else has as well!

    I'm in the UK by the way!

    Best of luck, it's a nightmare trying to do all these things by yourself, isn't it. Just other kick in the stomach, by this evil disease. It's not just our loved ones that are walking around with bruises! S is covered at the moment, his bum, top of his leg, back and side of his body!!! Hey ho!!!

    Lots of love

    Heady

  • hi jean

    i recommend a HONDA JAZZ `=I had 2 B4 i gave up driving

    bu tif yo are getting the DLA FOR CHRIS THEN YOU WOUDL BE ENTITLED TO A MOTABILITY CAR - IT IS WELL WORTH IT AS I AM JUST ABOUT 2 GET MY 2ND ONE NO(I ( WASNT SURE IF I WOUDL GET THE FULL 3 YRS OUT OF IT BTUIHave EAND AM SITLL HERE UPRIGT MOST FO THE TIEM WHEN I AM SITTIGN RO LYING DOW N)

    CBD ISI A DIFFERENT MATTER I BELIEVE IN TERmS OF Lasitng BTU A WHEELCHAIR, NOW ESSENTIAL FOR ME WHEN I AM GOING OTU, NEEDS OT FIT EASILY INTO THE BOOT OF THE CAR

    I HAV EJSUT BOUGHT A LIGHTWEIGHT OEN FOR VISTIS OUT AND AM ABOUT OT USE IT TODAY FOR THE 1ST TIEM

    SO WATCH THIS SPACE

    LOL Jill

    :-)

  • Hi I also can not drive but my wife drives a renault Kango, It is higher up and easyer for me to get in and out

  • Good morning, Jean,

    Just before my wife, Roisin, died, I received a quotation for a new type of car seat for people with reduced mobility; the main advantages are a) that it is a permanent seat that takes the place of the front passenger seat but allows for the electronically driven seat to move sideways through the open car door onto the special (fold_up) wheels of a wheelchair; and entry to the car from the wheelchair "chassis" by the same process; and b) that the seat is suitable for most types of car and therefore is transferable (by a mechanic) should the owner wish to change cars. Another advantage is that it allows the passenger to sit in the front of the car.

    The name of the supplying firm is PIMAS and you can obtain details through pimas.fr.

    The price quoted was 5573 euros or approximately £4600. For us, in France, this worked out considerably cheaper than the purchase of a new or second hand Citreon Berlingo plus conversion to take a wheelchair. My brother in the UK has a Motability Peugeot identical to the Citreon, I think it cost about three times the price of the PIMAS "turny" seat.

    I hope this helps you.

    Christopher.

  • Thanks for all these suggestions. Chris was 80 when diagnosed. I'm not sure why that means he is not eligible for help ! I will go and look at the cars, Online first, I think.

    Son has just driven off in the bigger car, so keeping it in the family. Feel I'm not rejecting car when it has been so reliable. How daft is that ? Son very happy too !! Jean

  • I know how you feel Doglinton. Our car went to our son as well and it's good to see it whenever he visits. I still think of her as mine.

  • Fortunately he is thrilled with it. Just come at the right time for him. Sometimes things work out for someone ! So I have a warm feeling about the car. He says I can drive it when I see him. [ he lives in Northamptonshire] Jean

  • Are you UK? or other? No help with anything in the USA that I know of. They don't care much for us old people since we aren't big consumers and only cost money.

    I have found that my husband is much better in and out of higher cars. We have a Toyota forerunner which is a 4 wheel drive utility car. Which is good for where we live.

    Jill

  • I live in Greenwich, London U.K. We have a supportive team but it seems because we have savings we don't get some help with some things. Chris goes to a day group once a week. We don't need too much at present but I know we will and I like to be prepared.. Jean

  • Jean, there is a gadget on the Parkinson's website shop that maybe of help to you for aiding the getting out of any car. Its a strap that goes round the top of the door, if you take a look you will see what I mean.

You may also like...