Lime in water: Hi all, I have been taking calcium... - PMRGCAuk

PMRGCAuk

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Lime in water

Harbel
Harbel

Hi all, I have been taking calcium but don't like doing so, and need magnesium as a consequence too.

But now I have reduced to 2mg and I have my own well with lots of lime (CaCO3) in it. I was thinking that getting it all the tea I drink, several cups, several times a day may be enough. I have to keep descaling the kettle etc, and if I thought it would be near good enough I would agree to drink more tea.

Anyone else living in hard water area?

13 Replies

No idea Harbel. Nice thought.

Harbel
Harbel in reply to SheffieldJane

I suppose I may be trying to escape fate!Thank you

PMRpro
PMRproAmbassador

You don't take alendronic acid do you?

Harbel
Harbel in reply to PMRpro

No, don't know about that, I feel that may be good? Thanks for replying

PMRpro
PMRproAmbassador in reply to Harbel

It is a medication for "bone protection". Good? Not necessarily but there is a lot of discussion about it on the forum. The point is you must not take it using well water or other mineral waters.

Harbel
Harbel in reply to PMRpro

Thanks PMRPro, that is interesting. I suppose that could be that one could be getting too much of something, perhaps phosphorus. I know calcium citrate is more absorbed than calcium carbonate but they sell more calcium carbonate as supplements as it is cheaper. I have given a site on our land to my daughter and they have installed an ionizing thing to stop the lime coagulation. Made me think why am I buying calcium carbonate especially when I note it produces constipation, when my son in law is looking for a solution for too much calcium coming from our shared well.I have read that lime is not absorbed but that suits selling the tablets. I have also read medical journals suggesting the opposite. I know hypercalcimia is a problem for some but not sure whether it or indeed kidney stones are related to calcium ingestion.

I know few enough on our site would be using water from a well from calceriferous rock and my question is not of general interest and I should try and do the research myself. Thank you, you are really great that you are so willing to give your time to answer so many questions for so many. I admire your knowledge and generosity, and you are aptly named!

PMRpro
PMRproAmbassador in reply to Harbel

We do absorb the calcium and magnesium in hard water just as we absorb them from any other source in our diet. I live in the Dolomites - our water is pretty hard! I grew up in a hard water village - the water came from an aquifer under our land. It tasted good - unlike the water at my great aunt's house. The pipeline from central Wales to Birmingham in the English Midlands ran through their land and part of the rent was free water. Very very soft - lovely for a bath, disgusting to drink and it made rubbish tea!

I don't mind softeners for bath water - but I'd rather buy a new kettle more often and have hard water for my tea. :) Many bathroom tiles here have a very slightly rough finish - so the hard water doesn't show up as calcium spots!

Harbel
Harbel in reply to PMRpro

Well of you ever venture to the south west of Ireland I would like to share with you a pot of lovely hard tea, none of the tea bag in the cup short cut for me!

PMRpro
PMRproAmbassador in reply to Harbel

Lord no - gypsy tea, disgusting and such a waste of a t-bag, offends my Aberdonian sensibilities (Aberdonians are to Scotland what the Scots are to the English). I was watching a hospital TV programme recently where someone was making 6 mugs of tea - using 6 t-bags ... I do espouse to the t-bag though for the sake of practicality...

Evercurious
Evercurious in reply to PMRpro

Could you give more info about that, please. I’ve been taking alendronate for about a year Ana’s a half (at doctors insistence , against my better judgement) and have never heard this. Am on a well.

PMRpro
PMRproAmbassador in reply to Evercurious

I'm fairly sure it says on the pack insert that mineral waters should not be used when taking bisphosphonates and this study looked at it:

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/269...

Well waters tend to have unknown levels of minerals.

Interestingly, this

link.springer.com/article/1...

extends the concept - no water with a high calcium/general mineral content should be used when taking bisphosphonates as it impairs the absorption of the drug.

I have to admit, I have no idea how much calcium is in our water. But I refuse to take a bisphosphonate anyway!

Evercurious
Evercurious in reply to PMRpro

Thanks, PMRpro. In Canada our prescriptions are counted out into plastic bottles, given with information leaflets. Mine said nothing about mineral water.More ammunition to present to doc arguing I should stop taking it. She’s so convincing, though!

PMRpro
PMRproAmbassador in reply to Evercurious

As you can see - a high calcium water stops the AA woring. Bit pointless!!!

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