steroid card: i have read we should have a steroid... - PMRGCAuk

PMRGCAuk
10,422 members18,952 posts

steroid card

candy28
candy28

i have read we should have a steroid card but haven't got one, does anyone know how i get one? i have made sure hubby is aware to mention steroids should i have an accident etc, i like to be prepared

thank you

58 Replies
oldestnewest

Ask at the pharmacy. That's where I got mine.

You should be able to obtain one from your pharmacist and I have even asked for one at other pharmacies when I've mislaid mine. I have always been given one without any problem whatsoever. The card enables you to record your current dose of steroids in case needed in an emergency. I also wear a 'steroid dependent' bracelet obtained from Amazon at very little cost.

Yep , got mine via the pharmacy .

I got mine when I joined PMRGCAUK. My chemist didn't seem to know what I was on about!

Suet3942
Suet3942
in reply to scats

Nor mine!

DorsetLady
DorsetLadyPMRGCAuk volunteer

My original one came from hospital pharmacy. Subsequent ones from pharmacy or charity (they used to send one out with donation reminder - but maybe not now on line.

If all else fails you can download one from t’internet!

I think I was going through them so quickly once I made my own with some blue card I had!

You might be able to do that - I’d offer, but bit handicapped at moment.👋🏼😳

For those in North America, you're out of luck. Alternative solution? Medical bracelet.

PMRpro
PMRproModerator
in reply to HeronNS

Given the awareness, or lack of it, of steroid cards - one is left to feel that a medical bracelet may be a better option anyway.

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to PMRpro

My understanding is the local first responders are trained to check for a bracelet or necklace/pendant. An advantage of mine is it links to a website where I can keep my contact info and medical info updated. This is free for my lifetime with purchase of the bracelet and can be accessed by a PIN engraved on the bracelet (along with, in my case, the word Prednisone). Particularly useful for people with multiple health issues, too, like diabetes or cardiovascular. :)

PMRpro
PMRproModerator
in reply to HeronNS

I suspect it depends on the local system - I'm not sure UK paramedics do though my daughter said that a bracelet was much more likely to be found than a pendant and they shouldn't be too jewelry-like.

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to PMRpro

I was just looking at the website and I note they have some for children which would not make me think medical alert at all, with pics of dinosaurs, etc....

But here, where there is no card system and medical alert bracelets are ubiquitous I think they do automatically check.

PMRpro
PMRproModerator
in reply to HeronNS

They should - I carry a card of medications and medical history in my handbag but I'm not sure it would be much use - it is in English ...

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to PMRpro

Is there not an equivalent service to Universal ID or Medic Alert available in all European countries? However your comment makes me wonder if our companies provide French option in Canada and Spanish in the US. Hmmmm. Need for Babelfish!

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to HeronNS

French option in Canada. :) Not that it helps you ;)

PMRpro
PMRproModerator
in reply to HeronNS

Not that I know of. But some of the options have multi-lingual helplines/computer options.

prunus
prunus
in reply to PMRpro

Knowing you're fluent in other languages why don't you translate it?

PMRpro
PMRproModerator
in reply to prunus

Because I only translate from the other languages into English - you are only ever really fluent in your mother tongue ...

Col75
Col75
in reply to PMRpro

I wear a rubber bracelet with Medical Alert on and condition which is Adrenal Insufficient..

£4 off the Internet..

I’ve just ordered a medical bracelet from

Amazon. It’s only about £12 - rubber/silicone type of strap available in a multitude of colours and you personalise the print you want on it. It should be arriving from China in about a week - I might let it lie around for a few days before unwrapping it in case it’s infected though 😂. Sorry, I’ve got a bit of a sick sense of humour 😊

PMRCanada
PMRCanada
in reply to HeronNS

I wondered because I’ve not ever got a card here in Canada, but will go on Amazon to purchase a bracelet. Do you happen to have the link for a fellow Canadian. Really need to do this as it’s been almost 2 years since I’ve been on pred! 🤦‍♀️

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to PMRCanada

I bought my bracelet from Universal medical ID's Canadian site.

canada.universalmedicalid.com/

PMRCanada
PMRCanada
in reply to HeronNS

Thank you!

I got mine from my pharmacy and also wear a bracelet. You can always make up your own card or I did find one you can print out off the internet from Imperialendo.

I got one, and a spare, from the rheumatologist but I also bought a rather fetching medical bracelet from amazon!

As well as carrying a steroid card I joined MedicAlert. Details of condition(s), medications and emergency contact details are engraved on a bracelet although I opted for a tag that fits on my wristwatch strap. A copy of the information is also included on a driving licence card that fits wallet or purse.

I am reassured that information is available if required and that my wife will be contacted ASAP in an emergency. It also saves a para-medic or other kind soul trying to find information on my phone or looking for my wallet.

Hope that helps.

great thank you everyone, i will ask the chemist when i go out next, i dont want to get a bracelet until the gp has really finished with her diagnosis just incase it changes, :)

Fran_Benson
Fran_BensonAdministrator
in reply to candy28

Hi Candy28, all our members are sent one when they join and each year on their renewal. If you get a confirmed diagnosis and would like to become a member, you can click on the post about becoming a member at the top of the page which will take you to our website.

I got mine from my Dr's surgery and keep it in my wallet/purse. Also wear a purple rubber bracelet which says Medical Alert.. Taking Steroids in bright yellow. I drive alot so that could hardly be missed in an accident!

I was given one with my first prescription. Have been asked on numerous occasions if I have one too. Perhaps they should give out automatically with first prescription.

I got one from my pharmacist - keep it with my phone

'Under the counter' at Boots the Chemist in Ilkley!

I got mine from the pharmacy x

Pharmacy and/or GP have them. Also, if you have an iPhone )might be possible with android not sure) there’s a medical ID you can fill in there and choose the option for it to show in your lock screen. Basically the persons who may find you can press the emergency button and then ‘medical ID’ and all info is visible to them.

It does somewhat depend on the person who finds you being slightly tech savvy though.

My pharmacist usually gives me a new one when she does my annual review of medications.

Hi I got my card from the chemist when I first started in them so I would ask them

I got mine when I joined this forum and keep it in my phone cover. I also have a bracelet for penicillin allergy and no ibuprofen - but they wouldn't fit on prednisolone so perhaps it's time for a purple bracelet as well! Good advice about it not looking too much like jewellery - my current one possibly is but it has the medic logo thingy on it.

Your local pharmacy should have them.

I just write on a sticky note what my condition is and how many mg of steroids I'm taking currently, and stick it onto the back of my driver's license. I update it as I taper down. Simple!

I don't have a steroid card despite the fact that I have been on Prednisilone for ages. I do have a Medic Alert bracelet which means that medical staff both here and overseas can get access to details of my numerous ailments and medication in case of an emergency where I am unable to tell them myself. Basic bracelets and pendants are quite cheap although you can spend a lot if you want Gold or Silver. In addition there is an annual membership fee and it is quite simple to update your medical information. The information is kept securely and is only available to medical professionals. I have had cause to be extremely thankful that I had joined the scheme when I was taken seriously ill and was unable to communicate. The Consultant who treated me whilst I was in Hospital said that, in my case, it was a life saver.

I was given a Steroid card when steroids were first prescribed. This card needs to be carried with you wherever you go. Even after you stoo taking steroids you need to continue carrying the card.

If you have been prescribed steroids ask your pharmacy for a card or get one from your doctor. Sometimes pharmacies are more helpful.

Hi got my from local pharmacy, in fact gave me 3 !

I got a medic tag to wear around my neck with ‘steroid dependent’ on it from Amazon. Cheap. I have had it for a couple of years. I don’t like bracelets and can hide the neck chain so it’s not obvious.

PMRpro
PMRproModerator
in reply to Kath567

So how would a paramedic find it? That does remain a question.

Kath567
Kath567
in reply to PMRpro

I don’t think it would be so urgent the paramedic would need to know I am on low dose prednisone, I figure when I got to hospital the nurses would see it when changing me into a hospital gown, if heart related, they would see if before on defibrillator pads or cpr.

PMRpro
PMRproModerator
in reply to Kath567

It is exactly a paramedic who needs to know if you are on low dose pred. That is the point at which you could suffer an adrenal crisis - and the immediate management is to give an injection of hydrocortisone which they carry. Long before anyone in the ED would see or suspect anything, by which time you could be seriously ill and unable to communicate.

Kath567
Kath567
in reply to PMRpro

Medic Alert shouldn’t sell necklace dog tags if they are useless.

PMRpro
PMRproModerator
in reply to Kath567

I didn't say that - I am pointing out that your comment about it not being important a paramedic knows you are on low dose pred isn't entirely correct.

Many companies sell many items that aren't ideal in practice.

Col75
Col75
in reply to PMRpro

I carry the Emergency Pack, have a Blue Card and a Rubber Bracelet with "Medical Alert - Adrenal Insufficient on it"

So the Emergency services know what to do..

I have never been given one. Didn't even think about their existence until I read this. I have been taking steroids for 2 years. Will ask my pharmacy next time I go. No good asking my GP,they know as much or less about PMR as I do.

the pharmacy gave me one today, its handy as i can write the do

sage and dates etc to keep track of what i have been on too :)

Yes, ask your pharmacy for one.

just an extra bit of info, i was at a medical chat this week with the hubby andthe man doing the talk was saying that these days the paramedic in an emergency will check your phone if the can for any medical information which can be opened from the locked screen

PMRpro
PMRproModerator
in reply to candy28

Always supposing they can find it ...

PS - my former paramedic daughter said she did but she doubts many colleagues did! She's in the hospital setting now, emergency medicine rather than pre-hospital.

Scoopitup
Scoopitup
in reply to PMRpro

Do they even take the pulse now as paramedics or do they just shove the finger thing on. When my sos bracelet went walkabout I thought of a temporary tattoo on my wrists for diabetes. . 😂🤣😂

PMRpro
PMRproModerator
in reply to Scoopitup

Our in-house one says she does and would like to think all paramedics would check a pulse properly ...

Scoopitup
Scoopitup
in reply to candy28

I saw, a post the other day from 5 years ago say the writer had a photo of their steroid card as a lock screen picture.

Your Doctor or Chemist should be able to give you one...

You may also like...