Told you Parkinson's disease was poo - Parkinson's Movement

Parkinson's Movement
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Told you Parkinson's disease was poo

WinnieThePoo
WinnieThePoo
10 Replies

theguardian.com/society/201...

10 Replies
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Xenos
1 like
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Icequeen10
Icequeen10
in reply to Xenos

I tjinnk that thiio is huge!¡

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WinnieThePoo

Of course, whilst my first assertion on this forum was that Parkinson's disease is poo, the first thing I learned is that pwp are not mice.

But it builds on the research into this important area.

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WinnieThePoo

And as Mrs W-T-P has commented when I showed her the article, in common with a lot of recent interesting posts, alpha-synuclein appears to be being identified as a definite bad boy once again.

Which caused her to ask if anyone else is on SPARK on this forum. I am not aware of anyone, and superficially the trial is still recruiting. Stop press - just looked and as of today (27 June 2019) it is not recruiting. So earliest results publication could be tomorrow plus 104 weeks, plus trial evaluation time - probably 2.5 years , say December 2021. Is anybody else on here on this trial?

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kalyan48

mannitol should offer some help

1 like
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francis6

...and, ultimately, gut health is dependent on the things we ingest, mainly food but also antibiotics and other medications. You are what you eat.

Interesting to note that leading researcher into gut health, Tim Spector, is saying that "good" diets are highly individual and that what is healthy for one person may be unhealthy for others.

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WinnieThePoo

Yes. The primary emphasis is on microbiome diversity. And he asserts the key to health and microbe diversity is the number of different plants eaten. A contrary approach to what he calls fads or religions, like vegan, gluten free, dairy free and other restricted diets. Red wine, olive oil, coffee, unpasteurised cheese, lots of plants, yoghurt, kefir, kombucha ... my kinda guy Tim Spector. Worth looking at blood glucose monitoring for personalisation. A fast moving field

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Rhyothemis

I just learned some things about the gut microbiome & vitamin A (retinoic acid):

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

"Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that lupus mice also bear

a leaky gut and that the intestinal barrier function can be enhanced by

gut colonization of probiotics such as Lactobacillus spp. Retinoic acid (RA) can increase the relative abundance of Lactobacillus

spp. in the gut. Interestingly, RA has also been shown to strengthen

the barrier function of epithelial cells in vitro and in the absence of

probiotic bacteria."

sciencedaily.com/releases/2...

"In both humans and mice, the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes comprise

the majority of the gut microbial community. To play their part in

regulating their hosts' immune systems, the bacteria in the microbiome

fine-tune the levels of a protein responsible for the conversion of

vitamin A to its active form in their hosts' gastrointestinal tract, the

researchers found."

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WinnieThePoo

Interesting. A balanced diet should provide good vitamins, fibre, and probiotics. I'm overdue another poo test to see whats happened to the balance of my bugs. It may have to wait for the Autumn now. I didnt know specifically about Vit A and L.baccilli, but I was aware how much everything is a balance.

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Rhyothemis

Like you posted above, there are a lot of individual differences & some can affect nutrient bioavailability:

onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi...

Then there's the issue of cellular bioavailability (normal serum levels don't guarantee utilization):

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/284...$=activity

One way to up cellular bioavailability is to inhibit catabolism; inhibition of CYP26B1 has been investigated as a therapy for PD:

michaeljfox.org/grant/inhib...

The only natural product inhibitor of CYPP26B1 I have come across so far is willow bark:

cyberleninka.ru/article/v/d...

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