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MRI and MRA burning sensation anyone?

So I just had my MRI/MRA done and never experienced this type of pain in any of my other scans. I told the assistant conducting the scan that I felt dizzy and my skin felt on fire (left side and top of head) My eyes we watering so bad! It hurt. The technition told me that it's probably the side cheek pillows that hold your head still. Nope! It hurt so bad and I still hurt. I complained in a friendly manner but was told that never happens. I was never given an explanation. Now I'm here with what feels like a big sun burn on my face and head.. Ouch!

Anybody else experienced this at all?!

Feeling 🌞 burned

Stephanie

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Stepinup, what you've experienced sounds awful. I wonder whether you had an allergic reaction to something when you were having your MRI/MRA done.

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I have never had an MRA but I have heard of people experiencing discomfort with the dye they use. Hope the burning sensation and pain have worn off by now, blessings Jimeka

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Hi Stepinup if not a reaction to the dye used, maybe to the cleaning solution used on the cheek pillows? Hope you are feeling better.

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Thanks everyone! Feeling much better. Wow I wouldn't want that to happen to anyone...just plan awful!

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Stepinup u should let neuro know. They may be able to use different contrast next time. Or sometimes, they can do a non contrast MRI depending on stable symptoms

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Wow Stepinup l completely agree with what erash said! Tell your Neurologists! I hope you still feel better! When do you get the results?

Jes🌠

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I'm so glad you're doing better. I would also get a message to the radiologist, or at least the department in general, as well as your neurologist. That information should not only be in your chart, but also listed as a possible problem for other patients.

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Ok I will ask, what is an MRA? MRII know but MRA is a new one on me. After 15+ yrs they're is still new acronyms to amuse me. Royce smiling at the really small stuff.

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An MRA is the image of your brains veins and arteries I believe.

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Thanx, appreciate it, Royce

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We're you wearing any type of makeup or mascara at the time?

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I had this same Experience on Friday - I WAS wearing makeup - no one told me not too-

Face burning - so awful - I feel like an idiot that I didn't know NOT to wear makeup. Sooooo worried that this burning sensation will not go away .

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MRI BURN INJURY

I sustained burn injury during a routine MRI procedure November, 2016. The incident occurred on a 3Tesla MRI machine during a CSpine/Thoracic scan. I was positioned lying on my back and entered head first. There was no padding used during the study but no part of my body touched the walls of the machine. I held the ‘panic’ button in my right hand and my hands came together just below my sternum in a typical ‘praying’ position so my arms rested on my upper abdomen as opposed to down by my sides. The procedure was started immediately. About 10 minutes into the 2nd procedure (thoracic) I started to feel a sort of prickly vibrating heat hitting my skin. It felt like a kind of rippling wave and I started to feel quite warm. It even seemed to vibrate my T-shirt and penetrate through. It was accompanied by a loud hum which I could hear over and above the typical clicking sound. I had never felt or heard anything like this on previous MRI procedures. The sensation wasn’t excruciatingly painful like you would expect from a contact burn, so I decided I would just see it through. I believe the combined CSpine/Thoracic procedure took approximately 30-40 minutes and I felt this sensation for about the last 10-15.

When I got off the table I felt hot and mentioned it to the technician. She said it was normal to feel a bit warm when the machine had been running for a while. As the day wore on my skin got redder. I felt and looked like I had a bad sunburn. I started applying Aloe Vera gels and lotions. By the next morning I was very red and sore. I was pretty concerned and worried there may be deeper tissue damage. The next day I went to see my doctor. She said she was unfamiliar with MRI related burn injuries but after looking at me felt it had been caused by some type of thermal exposure and advised use of cooling gels and lotions. She consulted with an MRI physicist about the problem and was told : "Regarding the burn: I’d definitely recommend the pt to be checked out by a Dermatologist. MR burns typically starts at subcutaneous fat (no pain receptors) and moves up to epidermis. If the pt was not sedated during the scan and ended up with a burn, there is a clear chance that the patient has damage under the skin that is not visible. I reached out to a Professor of Radiology at USC who looked at my story and pictures and told me this was an RF radiation burn and that I needed to be checked out by a dermatologist ASAP. This was the beginning of a nightmare that has now lasted over 6 months. I have consulted with numerous dermatologists, general practitioners and MRI specialists over this time as well as conducting my own research and have learned a lot about RF frequency injuries and SAR. One of the other MRI physicists I contacted recommended I look at the SAR readings for my tests. He said these are used as an indication of over-exposure and are usually less than 1.

I was able to find these readings in the DICOM data on the disk (shown below). The overheating feeling I experienced started about 5-10 minutes into the Thoracic procedure which coincides exactly with the 4th thoracic sequence. I was between 2.5 and 2.72 SAR for about 7 minutes and this is when the burning occurred. These SAR reading are of course the machine estimates and not the actual SAR on my body. My belief is that sustained exposure to SAR above 2.5 was too much for my body to dissipate the heat and I burned. Having had many MRI’s in the past I wondered why I had never had any problems before, but when I looked back at the SAR readings for numerous previous exams I noticed it was never more than 1.5 and whenever a sequence showed a higher SAR it was followed by one with lower SAR etc.

At 1 year post incident :

Skin – My skin continues to hurt wherever the thermal rays hit it. Face, neck, arms, upper torso and some on upper thighs. Erythema still present on face, neck and upper chest. I have a little temporary relief with lidocaine based topicals and anti inflammatories. Skin continues to atrophy and now shows marked deterioration and scarring. Dermatology consultations refer to skin corrosion consistent with a thermal burn injury and talk about protracted recovery times, and sometimes permanent damage.

Eyes – Eyes are also very susceptible to heat damage. I had an ophthalmology check a week after the injury. I am scheduled for a follow up 6 months after injury to check for cataract formation.

Testes – After the burn there was dramatic impairment of sexual function and seminal fluid change. I was made aware that testicular tissue is very susceptible to heat related damage due to a lack of ability in this area to disperse heat (much like the eyes). Since I did suffer from some burning on my upper inner thighs, it’s possible there was heat build-up in this area. I’m working with an Urologist to determine the extent of damage and again hope it’s not permanent. Testosterone production and semen analysis is ongoing and I’ve been put on Clomid to see if function can be restored.

You can follow my story on my blog site at mriburn.com

John

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What bothers me the most about this post is the fact the technician didnt know what happened, same thing happened to my friend and she said she felt like her arm was going to melt...same explanation from tech..IDK...or coverup. Im sorry you had to experiencel that as i saw the look on my friebds face, and knew it had to be terrible.

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