Introduction

Hi guys!

Just a 'hello' post. I'm whistlemytune, 31 from Kent UK. I'm a nurse, and live with my husband and our two gorgeous children.

I joined up today because I've noticed my migraines become more frequent. In the last year, I've had 4 or 5 (not entirely sure - I may start charting them), and 3 of those have been at work.

Yesterday was a particularly busy day on my ward and I was in the middle of a drug round when I noticed the blind spots (aura). I quickly had to tell the nurse in charge and take painkillers. Really not an ideal time at all! I had to abandon my day at work (luckily I only had about 1.5hrs left of my shift), and leave for bed.

Because they're getting more frequent, I'm thinking of going to my doctor about it... though I'm not sure what they'll do. My migraines aren't close together at all, but the fact that they're getting more frequent may need to just be mentioned. Don't know. The only medication I'm on at the moment is citalopram 20mg for depression, which does help my depression for sure.

Anyway, I waffled on! Thanks for reading.

xxx

6 Replies

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  • Hi Whistlemytune 😆 welcome 😆 yeah start a chart to see if you can see a pattern and log what you ate that day. You should mention it to the gp.

    You'll most likely be given a triptan to try.

    Your chart will help you to find possible triggers but i know in your profession you probably can't eat small amounts throughout the day and stay hydrated.

    Good luck 😆

  • Definitely make an appt. with your GP. Triptans are a life saver for many. And there are a lot of other options worth trying too. Read up on the migraine trust website before you go to your GP. Many GPs are not experts in migraines. So inform yourself on the options before you get there.

  • Hi welcome to our lovely group. It's really helpful to know you're not alone when pain gets grim. Triptans are a life saver I couldn't hold down my full time job without them. Take care they don't start loading you up with beta blockers, anti epilepsy drugs etc.

    A lot of migraine problems can be helped by life style changes like going to bed and getting up at the same time, drinking 3+ litres of water a day, eating regularly. All difficult if you work shifts. I worked in fire control and had to go on days.

    It's hard but everything you experience somebody on here can tell you while it's painful you're not alone. Good luck xx

  • It may be worth getting your folate levels checked - citalopram is an SSRI so can cause problems with folate levels.

    Folate works very closely with B12 and deficiency in either can lead to macrocytic anaemia.

    The frequency and severity of my migraines increased whilst I was B12 deficient.

    Worth looking at B12 levels as well though I'd be wary of taking 'normal' as really meaning normal - people vary a lot in how they respond to B12 and it is one thing where symptoms (which include depression) are at least as important as the actual numbers from a serum B12 test.

  • Can't make a comment on the meds you are currently taking but agree with the others about making sure you keep your routine the same and eat and drink enough throughout your shift even though that is difficult.

    GPs jus don't know much and always want to prescribe meds and nothing else. Drs at the Migraine Centre can help for sure.

    And just be careful of the amount of meds you are taking so that you don't get medication overuse.

  • Thanks so much for all your help guys. I went to my doctor yesterday for a review of my antidepressant anyway, and mentioned the migraines. He actually didn't comment at all! It didn't seem like he had much of a clue about them. I just said, "Shall I keep a record of when they happen?" and he was just like, "Yeah." but at least I mentioned it, and I'm hoping he wrote it in my notes!

    I've also been experiencing chronic tiredness for the past week. Today, I went to bed from 2pm til 6pm! Couldn't believe I'd slept so long. I might ask for a blood test if it continues.