driving licence

Evening every one, hope every body ok, just a quick one, has any one been told to give up driving as a result of aps or dissability caused by aps , i did ring dvla but was put on hold and at £1.52 a minitue i wasnt hanging about ! as my licence was due for renewal 3 year ago (oops) been avioding the form for renewal as of the health questions!!! thanks

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  • Hi, I was advised to surrender my licence before having it revoked as its easier to get back if you do once/if your given an assessment and told your ok to drive. I gave mine up before a diagnosis of stroke as it affected my sight and left me partially sighted,and i didnt feel safe driving. it could have been my kids or someone elses that was killed - if you dont feel safe then dont do it if only for your own peace of mind. I think it depends how your aps affects you personally, mine was sight, and even if they had have offered it back i wouldnt have taken it, even the muscle spasms and lack of concentration to me isnt worth the risk. I miss it terribly and my life is so hard without it but i know for me it was the right decision, hope it works out for you though and you keep your freedom if its the right thing for you x

  • Yes been thinking the same , hard choice i do have to rest wen driving as had 3 subclavical dvt,s and has left my right arm parcialy disabled, and my left eye is not what it used to be after swine flue pneumonia couple years ago also the other ailments you mentioned twitches etc, think it time to ask the doc , thanks for reply

  • Hi,

    i was told by my consultant that I was no longer safe to drive due to dizziness, loss of vision, delayed thinking / reaction time etc but he didn't tell me to surrender my licence.

    I haven't driven for around 4 years now, although i find it very frustrating and have lost so much independence (i can't walk far either) I know that I am unable to drive and if i did i would be putting myself and others in danger.

  • Same for me. After a stroke, no one told me I can't drive but I know for sure my reactions are slow and my decision making is impaired - dangerous out on the road. Haven't driven for three years - miss it terribly, but sure I've made the right decision. Larraine x

  • I lost vision in my right eye after stroke from aps, now I can't drive, but sure do miss it!!!!

  • similar to above - haven't driven for about three years. No one has told me not to and since ops on my eyes I can see perfectly well. The trouble is my reaction time is extremely slow and I can't make those instant decisions that you need to when driving. Moved to the country six years ago with a poor bus service so it has had huge implications on my life. However, it's not just me that needs to be considered, it's other road users. By the way, being 58 I was not entitled to a bus pass, but my doctor wrote a letter and I was able to get a companion bus pass. This means I can take someone on the bus with no charge for either of us. Obviously, this may be different in different areas. And to be honest I don't use it very much and rely on lifts. Stella

  • Hi DD

    Have researched this thoroughly for the new website - please see info below - hope it helps :)

    •Driving

    Many Hughes syndrome patients are concerned about their safety to drive and whether they need to declare their condition to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA).

    Despite the DVLA listing a vast number of conditions (link to: direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring/D... Hughes syndrome/antiphospholipid syndrome is not included. We contacted the DVLA in May 2012 and asked if they had any guidelines for Hughes/antiphospholipid syndrome, but are still waiting to hear from them. So, in the meantime, we have listed here the possible conditions the DVLA recognises which can arise from having Hughes syndrome and what you need to do:

    •Blood clots

    •Cognitive problems

    •Dizziness/giddiness

    •Heart attack

    •Heart valve problems

    •Kidney problems

    •Memory problems (severe)

    •Seizures

    •Stroke

    •Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA)

    Please remember that the law requires you to tell the DVLA about any condition that may affect your ability to drive safely. If you are involved in an accident and it is found that your health condition was a contributing factor, you may be prosecuted and your insurance may not be valid.

    - Blood clots and driving. If you hold any type of vehicle licence, you will not need to tell the DVLA that you have had a blood clot in the limbs (Deep Vein Thrombosis) or lung (Pulmonary Embolism).

    - Cognitive problems and driving. If you hold any type of vehicle licence, you will need to tell the DVLA that you have cognitive problems. Please visit the Direct Gov website and download the questionnaire FEP1 (link to: direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring/D...

    - Dizziness and driving. If you hold any type of vehicle licence, you will need to tell the DVLA that you suffer from dizziness or giddiness. Please visit the Direct Gov website and download the questionnaire FEP1 (link to: direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring/D...

    - Heart attack and driving. If you have a car or motorcycle licence, you will not need to tell the DVLA you have had a heart attack. However, you should stop driving for at least one month and only restart when your doctor tells you it is safe to do so. Anyone with a bus, coach or lorry licence will automatically have to inform the DVLA.

    - Heart valve disease and driving. If you have a car or motorcycle licence, you will not need to tell the DVLA you have heart valve problems. Anyone with a bus, coach or lorry licence will automatically have to inform the DVLA.

    - Kidney problems and driving. If you have a car or motorcycle licence, you will not need to tell the DVLA you have kidney problems. Anyone with a bus, coach or lorry licence will automatically have to inform the DVLA.

    - Memory problems (severe) and driving. If you hold any type of vehicle licence, you will need to tell the DVLA that you suffer from severe memory problems. Please visit the Direct Gov website and download the questionnaire FEP1 (link to: direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring/D...

    - Seizures and driving. If you have experienced seizures, you will need to let the DVLA know – this applies to all licence holders. Please visit the Direct Gov website and download the questionnaire FEP1 (link to: direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring/D...

    - Stroke and driving. If you have a car or motorcycle licence and are not suffering from any residual problems after a month from having your stroke, you will not need to tell the DVLA about your medical condition. However, if you are still experiencing problems, then you will need to let them know. Please visit the Direct Gov website and download questionnaire STR1 (link to direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring/D... Anyone with a bus, coach or lorry licence will automatically have to inform the DVLA.

    - Transient Ischaemic Attacks (TIAs) and driving. If you have a car or motorcycle licence, you will not need to tell the DVLA that you have had a TIA. However, you should stop driving for at least one month and only restart when your doctor tells you it is safe to do so. Anyone with a bus, coach or lorry licence will automatically have to inform the DVLA.

  • My understanding , and I have had some experience of traffic law a lifetime ago,was that there are certain prescribed conditions that require you to make contact with DVLA, some to stop driving and others which depend upon the effect of various conditions. In my case, a single TIA wasn't an issue but three in a day, or short space of time, was. (and I thought the stroke man's reason for telling me not to drive was because of the effect of tests he was likely to do)

    Though instructed not to drive for three months, I did not hand in my licence nor was I required to do so. Some have experienced issues getting licences back. My doctor was obliged to report the multiple TIAs to DVLA. My licence wasn't suspended either as far as I recall, I just stopped driving for the allotted period. I wrote, after getting the 3 month all clear from the doc, to say that I intended driving again and I got a letter back saying fine but giving advice about various conditions and their consequences.

    When looking at the website, pay particular attention to the words, 'may' does not mean 'must' for example. The type of licence held makes a great difference, I presume we are all thinking of basic driving licences and not any kind of public service licence.

    Remember that as well as advising the DVLA, your insurance company must be told of relevant heallth conditions- but don't panic as long as you are not driving when you shouldn't you will not automatically be loaded I wasn't.

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