Missing my Daughter

Hi everyone, I am a Mother with a Daughter who suffered a hypoxic brain injury through being hypo (she is diabetic) and having a lot of drink and drugs in her system. She was at a friends house and they all thought she was asleep, and she was left a long time.

Three months on and she is in a brain rehab hospital. I go every day to see her and can't wait for her to come home. She is 33 and has a 12 year old boy.

She definitely recognises me and even said Mum the other day, which was fantastic! It was the 1st word I have heard her say since her injury. Although the nurses have told me that she has said a few choice 4 letter words when they are turning her and pulling her about. But I hadn't heard any.

I understand it it going to be a hard and long journey for Kelly and all of us, and that it is early days. It seems a lifetime ago that I spoke to her or received a phone call or text message. I miss her a lot.

It is helping me to read about all of your experiences here. Please keep them coming

7 Replies

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  • I'm so sorry to hear what Kelly is going thro! She is young and has the love of you all giving her so much strength! Take care, Linda x

  • You take care too, and continue to recover to the full xx

  • Hi Yes it is very early days for you, When you first hear them speak its like hearing them all over again like a babies first word, i remember it well, my sons first word after his brain injury was Dad, we all got so excited and cried, laughted the emotions go wild. At first it was so quite and slurred I think all in all it took him a year to be able to speak clearly, but even now 6 years on when he is tired his speach gets slurred. When you go to see your daughter take photos with you of anything that she will recognise ask her about them, even pin them up, if she likes musci let her listen to some, all this helps. By the way you may get many swear words yet lol but I would not worry if i were you, this is very common. You take great care. One more thing, right a diary each time you go wright down what she has done and not done, when you read back you will see how things are changing each day, because sometimes we dont think things are getting any better, but if you right things down you realise she may have done a lot more than you remember and when your daughter is getting back on her feet, she will love to read all about her journey.

  • Thank you so much, your kind words are heaven. I really do hope that one day she will be able to have some quality of life.Give your son my best wishes and love

  • My heart goes out to you. That could so easily have been my daughter. She is 18 and T1 for 18 months. She drank (a lot - well she is a teenager) and has very poor control of her glucose levels. The poor levels were not her fault, even now it is uncontrollable and she s being PEG fed and is on sliding scale. I have always worried that she would hypo and either not be found or not be treated by whoever she was with.

    Instead, she crashed her car (not hypo) and suffered a severe diffusion axonal injury and is currently on HDU waiting to be transferred to a neuro rehab unit. She may never regain any skills because of the severity of her injuries.

  • Oh Ettenna, don't give up hope, I am sure her young age will be on her side. I went in to see my Daughter yesterday and she gave me a huge smile for the first time. I cried and documented it in my journal as I do every little thing she does. They told me that my Daughter would probably be in a vegatative state for the rest of her life and she has proved them wrong after 3 months. The truth is they don't know themselves. Please keep in touch and we will cry on each other's shoulders.

  • Please don't give up hope, like Sanda has said, she has her age on her side. We were told our son would be a vegetable, but he proved everyone one wrong, I know each brain injury is different, but please hang on in there.My heart goes out to you. Please let us know how your daughter is going on. Take great care x

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