Sesaminol prevents Parkinson's disease by... - Cure Parkinson's

Cure Parkinson's

18,804 members19,423 posts

Sesaminol prevents Parkinson's disease by activating a signaling pathway

John_morris71
John_morris71

FYI - ( see article in link for pics/graphs)

medicalxpress.com/news/2021...

Researchers report that the chemical sesaminol, naturally occurring in sesame seeds, protects against Parkinson's disease by preventing neuronal damage that decreases the production of dopamine. In vitro experiments show sesaminol handles oxidative stress in cells by regulating the production of reactive oxygen species and the movement of antioxidants. In vivo experiments reveal that dietary intake of sesaminol increases production of dopamine and significantly improves motor function in mice.

Sesame seed oil, used by many for its nutty aroma and high burn point, is made by extracting the fatty oils from sesame seeds, with the empty shells thrown out as waste. In a literal instantiation of the age-old adage "one man's trash is another man's treasure," researchers discovered that a chemical called sesaminol, abundant in this waste, has protective effects against Parkinson's disease.

"Currently, there is no preventive medicine for Parkinson's disease," states OCU Associate Professor Akiko Kojima-Yuasa, "We only have coping treatments." Associate Professor Kojima-Yuasa led her research group through a series of experiments to understand the effects of sesaminol on in vitro and in vivo Parkinson's disease models.

Parkinson's disease is caused when certain neurons in the brain involved with movement break down or die due in part to a situation called oxidative stress—neurons in the brain come under extreme pressure from an imbalance between antioxidants and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In cell-based in vitro experiments, the team found that sesaminol protected against neuronal damage by promoting the translocation of Nrf2, a protein involved in the response to oxidative stress, and by reducing the production of intracellular ROS.

In vivo experiments brought Associate Professor Kojima-Yuasa's team equally promising results. The impairment of movement due to Parkinson's disease is the result of damaged neurons producing less dopamine than is required. The team showed that mice with Parkinson's disease models show this lack of dopamine production. However, after feeding the mice a diet containing sesaminol for 36 days, the research team saw an increase in dopamine levels. Alongside this, a rotarod performance test revealed a significant increase in motor performance and intestinal motor function.

With the first-ever medicine for Parkinson's disease potentially being the naturally occurring food ingredient sesaminol, naturally occurring waste of the sesame seed industry, Associate Professor Kojima-Yuasa and her team are ready to take their work to the clinical trial phase and connect the consumption/production chain in a way that, as she puts it, "prevents diseases with natural foods to greatly promote societal health."

60 Replies

Sesame tahini mixed with a little bit of honey is one of my favorite snacks - reminds me of halvah. Now will have to try it with some cinnamon to make it even more PD fighting :)

faridaro
faridaro in reply to faridaro

Just whipped up a small batch of this concoction - the most delicious medicine... Thank you John_morris and Park Bear! Just hope I won't overdose :)

rescuema
rescuema in reply to faridaro

Be sure to drink lots of water and possibly add a bit of calcium citrate - both sesame and cinnamon are high in oxalates so you might want to watch the quantity you consume. I just ate a spoonful of raw sesame seeds myself along with tocotrienols.

😁

park_bear
park_bear in reply to rescuema

I put this comment here because it is the place where the most people commenting on this post would be notified of it.

This study assessed whether mice were protected against rotenone induced parkinsonism. Not a good test as to whether sesaminol promotes recovery from actual Parkinson's, especially since there are transgenic mice that produce defective alpha synuclein and actually get Parkinson's.

Also, producing the sesaminol requires a fermentation step:

cell.com/action/showPdf?pii...

"most sesaminol exists as a glycoside, and sesaminol remains in the form of glycoside in the defatted residue after the extraction of sesame oil. A recent method for purifying sesaminol from sesaminol glycoside was established,"

namely

"Preparation of sesaminol Paenibacillus sp. KB0549 strain was cultivated in a medium obtained by the addition of 1% tryptone, 0.5% yeast extract and 0.89% NaCl to a liquid extraction of sesame defatted debris with warm water. The obtained culture broth was added to heat-sterilized sesame defatted debris and fermented at 37C for 6 days using a solid fermenter under intermittent stirring and aeration conditions. The fermented sesame defatted debris was dried, 95% ethanol was added, and the mixture was stirred at 50C to extract sesaminol."

Ghmac
Ghmac in reply to park_bear

So park_bear do you think tahini /sesame oil/halva/sesame seed bars wont have a healing affect because they are not fermented?

park_bear
park_bear in reply to Ghmac

For starters, as I implied my previous comment, the actual healing effect of sesaminol is questionable because the animal model used to test it was not very good.

In reply to your question, sesame seed products are unlikely to contain sesaminol without fermentation or other special processing. As to the healing effect of what they do contain, no idea.

Ghmac
Ghmac in reply to park_bear

Thank you -

rescuema
rescuema in reply to park_bear

Both sesame seeds and sesame oils do contain sesaminol, and it's often added to the oil to extend the storage.

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/232...

pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/jf...

park_bear
park_bear in reply to rescuema

Per the first reference the content of sesaminol in sesame seeds and oils was 18 and 36 ppm respectively, which is not very much.

Per the second reference sesaminol protects against oxidative stress, which is good but not the same as recovery from PD.

The third reference tells us sesaminol is produced by gut bacteria. If this is occurring in the colon not clear how much actually will get absorbed.

rescuema
rescuema in reply to park_bear

"In sesame oil, the sesamin and sesamolin contents ranged from 4112.3 to 7523.2 mg/kg (average 5786.8 ± 1029.3 mg/kg) and from 1818.0 to 4071.5 mg/kg (average 2614.3 ± 633.8 mg/kg), respectively. The sesamol and sesaminol contents were in the ranges 9.8−108.7 mg/kg (average 61.6 ± 19.8 mg/kg) and 8.8−62.7 mg/kg (average 37.8 ± 15.4 mg/kg). The total lignans in sesame oil ranged from 6059.9 to 11479.9 mg/kg, with an average content of 8500.5 ± 1564.7 mg/kg. "

I've posted earlier below -

"Whether the refined sesaminol's noticed benefit is solely attributed to being an Nrf2 promotor will remain to be seen. In the meanwhile, we have sulforaphane for that readily available through broccoli sprouts."

The third reference was to show that fermentation refinement is not necessary to reap the benefit from sesaminol along with other lignans that are known for numerous health benefits, especially in Asia.

park_bear
park_bear in reply to rescuema

mg/kg is the same as ppm.

rescuema
rescuema in reply to park_bear

Yes deleted my response already because I couldn't find your 36ppm initially.

rescuema
rescuema in reply to park_bear

Additional references -

"Sesame seeds exhibit the second-highest lignan concentration, with sesaminol as the major constituent, at 538.08 mg/100 g"

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

"Analysis of 65 different samples of sesame seeds indicated that the content of sesaminol triglucoside ranged from 36 to 1560 mg/100 g of seed (mean 637 ± 312) and that of sesaminol diglucoside ranged from 0 to 493 mg/100 g of seed (mean 75 ± 95)."

pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/jf...

"The content of sesaminol triglucoside in 100 g seeds ranged from 14.1 to 91.3 mg with an average value of 68.4 mg; that of sesaminol diglucoside from 8.2 to 18.3 mg with an average value of 11.6 mg; and that of sesaminol monoglucoside from 5.4 to 19.5 mg with an average value of 8.3 mg. The total content of sesaminol glucoside was 88.3 mg in 100 g of sesame seeds. "

onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi...

As they've mentioned, it seems to vary a lot depending on varieties.

park_bear
park_bear in reply to rescuema

That is the glucoside. A glucoside is a glycoside that is derived from glucose. According to the original paper:

cell.com/action/showPdf?pii...

"most sesaminol exists as a glycoside, and sesaminol remains in the form of glycoside in the defatted residue after the extraction of sesame oil. A recent method for purifying sesaminol from sesaminol glycoside was established,"

Implying that the glycoside form is not effective and that the glucose moieties must first be removed to activate the molecule.

rescuema
rescuema in reply to park_bear

They "may" be implying it but does it mean that the glycoside can't be beneficial unless extracted?

I doubt it.

park_bear
park_bear in reply to rescuema

They specifically turned the glycoside version into unadorned sesamol and then showed that was effective. (Effective under their way of testing.) They would not have bothered with that step had the glycoside version been effective.

rescuema
rescuema in reply to park_bear

It seems they chose to test with the purified sesaminol to improve the efficiency and utilization of the triglucoside of sesaminol resistant to the action of β-glucosidases.

This does not tell me that ingested glycosides are not beneficial especially when aided by human intestinal microbiota as posted earlier.

researchgate.net/publicatio...

"In the digestive track of animals, intestinal bacteria remove glucose from lignan glucosides [133,134] and transform lignan aglycons into metabolites designated enterolignans [40,146]. "

mdpi.com/1420-3049/26/4/883...

Despe
Despe in reply to rescuema

How about this delicacy? :)

amazon.com/Greek-HEALTH-CHO...

rescuema
rescuema in reply to Despe

Might be yummy but I wouldn't go crazy with it. ; )

Despe
Despe in reply to rescuema

Yes, you are right. We have it as a desert a couple three times a week.

rescuema
rescuema in reply to Despe

I've never tried halva so I ordered the brand you suggested but the organic one with honey (I don't like Stevia). I'm so hungry right now (fasting today) I've ordered a bunch of stuff on Amazon. Not good - shopping while hungry. 😱

amazon.com/Greek-Halva-Orga...

Despe
Despe in reply to rescuema

:) :)

Despe
Despe in reply to Despe

For me, I order this: Husband eats the organic one with Stevia. Of course, I don't eat a lot of it as it contains sugar, just a little to satisfy my sweet tooth once in a while. :)

amazon.com/Greek-Halva-HEAL...

rescuema
rescuema in reply to Despe

That looks super yummy too but I need to stay away from it. Almond is also very high in oxalates. 😪

Despe
Despe in reply to rescuema

My motto is "Everything in moderation." :)

Really? I didn't know that - I'm addicted to almonds. I have to eat a big handful every day........is that too many I wonder?

As long as you're drinking lots of water and not have kidney issues, you might be ok. It would be even better if you get some raw organic almonds to soak and sprout the almonds for better nutrition.

Unfortunately organic is too expensive for the amount I eat. I buy a big bag of raw almonds from Costco (I know, not the best quality, but good value for money)

"And according to EPA documents from October 5th, 2015, 85% of almonds are treated with glyphosate."

jemorganics.com/blogs/news/...

Thanks for this rescue. Looks as though I shall have to spend more and buy less (organic)

👍

Despe
Despe in reply to rescuema

I order these sesame seed bars regularly as well as halva.

amazon.com/Dulzura-Borincan...

faridaro
faridaro in reply to rescuema

Thank you Rescuema for good advice, I am aware of oxalates in many products but didn't know calcium citrate can reduce oxalate absorption. How about tocotrienols - do they also affect oxalates ?

rescuema
rescuema in reply to faridaro

Calcium citrate can help bind the oxalates present in the foods when eaten together. I use this trick whenever I make a green smoothie or eating foods high in oxalates.

Tocotrienols have a potent synergistic anti-cancer effect with sesamin.

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/229...

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/232...

Whether the refined sesaminol's noticed benefit is solely attributed to being an Nrf2 promotor will remain to be seen. In the meanwhile, we have sulforaphane for that readily available through broccoli sprouts.

Sesame seeds contain 4 commonly known beneficial lignans - sesamin, sesamol, sesaminol and sesamolin with very high antioxidant activities. These lignans are oil soluble and even present in the extracted sesame oil in some amounts, so using the oil can also be beneficial although you need to balance out for high omega 6. I like eating whole sesame seeds (raw or sprouted), and we can leave it up to our gut microbiome to ferment the lignan glycoside in our digestive tract. The only thing you should be mindful of is that you need to thoroughly chew/grind the seeds or they'll come straight out through #2.

pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/jf...

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

faridaro
faridaro in reply to rescuema

Very interesting information! How much calcium citrate do you take with your smoothies? Also, do you take it separately or mixed into the smoothie?

rescuema
rescuema in reply to faridaro

I use calcium citrate powder and you should mix it in with food to bind it. Taking potassium citrate separately can also help prevent renal issues.

The intake depends on your calcium requirement and food intake, but I typically use about 1/2 tsp or up to 500mg calcium around a tsp or so per serving.

KERRINGTON
KERRINGTON in reply to faridaro

About how much tahini do you need to make your 'concoction' ?

faridaro
faridaro in reply to KERRINGTON

It all depends how much you would want to consume (also taking caloric and oxalate factor into consideration). Last night I've had about 1/4 cup of tahini left in a jar. So I mixed in about 1/4 to 1//2 teaspoon of honey and a little bit of cinnamon - none of the ingredients were measured, so that was the 'concoction'.

Today I got a new 14 oz jar of tahini, mixed in about 1 tablespoon of honey, 1 teaspoon cinnamon and 1 teaspoon vanilla extract - turned out even better!

And then I thought - may be I should check out vanilla extract for PD... and couldn't believe my eyes when I came across the following study which states:

The capacity of vanillin and vanillic acid to influence neurodegenerative processes such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease, and Huntington's disease was evaluated in several animal models. In a model, rats were induced with rotenone to produce PD-like symptoms and treated with vanillin (5, 10, 20 mg/kg, p.o.; 40 days). Compared with controls, vanillin diminished behavioral and cognitive impairments and counteracted the rotenone-induced striatal depletion of dopamine.71 In a rat model in which symptoms of PD were produced by intranigral injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), vanillin administration (5, 10, 20 mg/kg, i.p.; 24 days) improved motor dysfunction, enhanced the survival rate of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN), and suppressed LPS-induced activation of microglia in the SN.72 In the PD model, the beneficial actions of vanillin were associated with increases in glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities in brain tissue and in the level of glutathione (GSH) in the SN.

journals.lww.com/nutritiont...

So, the remedies are getting better and better, just make sure to follow Rescuema's advice to drink plenty of water and have some calcium citrate to prevent oxalates absorption.

rescuema
rescuema in reply to faridaro

I'm fasting today and this is getting me too hungry!

Goes to show that food is medicine.

Just wanted to share the info. I am sure it is worth trying and would be nice to know if there is any improvement after a couple of months of eating.

I am going to have 2-3 tablespoons of my 'concoction' per day and will let you know if there are any results.

rescuema
rescuema in reply to faridaro

Maybe you can try substituting the honey with mannitol? ...Though high in sugar, I suppose 1/4 honey wouldn't hurt and it is a source of trehalose (similar to mannitol).

faridaro
faridaro in reply to rescuema

Wow - great advice! After I am finished with this jar I'll definitely try the mannitol version.

rescuema
rescuema in reply to faridaro

Your vanilla addition was genius. I posted a recipe today!

healthunlocked.com/cure-par...

faridaro
faridaro in reply to rescuema

Thank you! Glad you enjoyed it.

Are you saying trehalose comes from honey? I order from trehalose.co.uk I thought I read somewhere that it was derived from seaweed or plants guess I was wrong

Honey has a small amount of trehalose, and you're right that seaweed, mushrooms, shrimps, lobsters, etc also contain trehalose.

Reading this while reading my morning sesame bagel.

Are you recommending tahini? If so, how much? What concoction is faridaro referring to? I know we are all interested in learning about anything that might help. Sometimes, though, I feel like I missed part of a discussion.

faridaro
faridaro in reply to BlueHawaii

My understanding (from John_morris' post) is that sesame oil contains sesaminol which has positive effect on dopamine production. However, according to Park Bear "producing the sesaminol requires a fermentation step" so I am not sure how much sesaminol is in tahini but since I enjoy it sometimes as a snack, I came up with this 'concoction' - see my response to Kerrington.

So just to clarify - Calcium carbonate has the most calcium per pill (40 percent), therefore fewer pills are needed. Some find calcium carbonate constipating. Calcium citrate is well absorbed on an empty stomach and does not constipate. The downside is that it has less calcium per pill (20 percent).

My question if you are taking a calcium carbonate of 600mg daily you wouldn't need to supplement Calicum Citrate for your concoction?

rescuema
rescuema in reply to Ghmac

Using calcium citrate is to bind the oxalates here, but it is also a source of elemental calcium (1 tsp/2300mg = around 500mg calcium, check your SF). If you take calcium separated from meals, you can actually increase the risk of stone formation. Calcium citrate reduces oxalate absorption in the gastrointestinal tract by binding and dissolving oxalates for excretion. Citrate helps prevent kidney stones from developing, but you can also use calcium carbonate with meals if preferred although less ideal.

Despe
Despe in reply to rescuema

Rescuema,

I believed Calcium is bad for PwP. I don't remember exactly when I read it and details. That is the reason husband doesn't take any calcium. However, we eat sesame seed bars, tahini and halva as they are high in calcium. Am I wrong?

rescuema
rescuema in reply to Despe

You read my post in relevance to vitamin D overdose and hypercalcemia and its role in glutamate firing. Excess calcium is bad, but calcium is essential for health and electrolyte balance, so you don't want deficiency either.

Despe
Despe in reply to rescuema

Thanks! Would you recommend Calcium Citrate 500mg a day? I am taking Calcium Carbonate 500mg/day, (if I eat calcium rich foods, I don't take the supplement, as too much calcium is bad for the arteries). Would Calcium Carbonate be OK for my husband, too?

rescuema
rescuema in reply to Despe

If you're eating calcium-rich foods, you shouldn't need to supplement calcium unless you're trying to address a known deficiency under Dr's order. When eating oxalate-rich foods (such as in sesame, kale, spinach, etc), it's a good idea to bind the oxalates using calcium citrate.

Despe
Despe in reply to rescuema

Well, I do have osteoposoris, however because of life-long exercising, the outer part of my bones is dense, the interior of the bones isn't. Something like that according to the doctor.

More reasons to chow on sesame seeds/oil -

Anti-Amyloid Aggregation Activity of Black Sesame Pigment: Toward a Novel Alzheimer’s Disease Preventive Agent

mdpi.com/1420-3049/23/3/676...

Effects of Sesaminol Feeding on Brain Aβ Accumulation in a Senescence-Accelerated Mouse-Prone 8

Long-term intake of sesaminol has been proposed to inhibit the pathogenic extracellular β-amyloid aggregation observed in Alzheimer’s Disease.

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/272...

Sesame oil mitigates memory impairment, oxidative stress, and neurodegeneration in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease. A pivotal role of NF-κB/p38MAPK/BDNF/PPAR-γ pathways: ..In conclusion, the neuroprotective effect of SO involved the modulation of different mechanisms targeting oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and cognitive functions. SO may modulate different molecular targets involved in AD pathogenesis by alterations of NF-κB/p38MAPK/BDNF/PPAR-γ signalling and this may be attributed to the synergistic effect of their active components.

sciencedirect.com/science/a...

Dietary supplementation with peptides from sesame cake alleviates Parkinson’s associated pathologies in Caenorhabditis elegans:...The results point toward regulation of Nrf-2/SKN-1 as a potential avenue for the prevention or improvement of PD.

sciencedirect.com/science/a...

Sesamin imparts neuroprotection against intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity by inhibition of astroglial activation, apoptosis, and oxidative stress: ...These findings reveal the reversal effect of sesamin in 6-OHDA model of PD via attenuation of apoptosis, astrogliosis, oxidative stress, and down-regulation of α-synuclein.

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/281...

Supplementation of Sesamin Alleviates Stress-Induced Behavioral and Psychological Disorders via Reshaping the Gut Microbiota Structure.

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/316...

Despe
Despe in reply to rescuema

"Dietary supplementation with peptides from sesame cake. . "

Such as?

rescuema
rescuema in reply to Despe

I wouldn't worry about isolating peptides through buffer extraction used to experiment on tiny nematodes with a very short lifespan while we can simply eat the whole sesame seeds containing the antiparkinsonian peptides. It is interesting that induction of autophagy and attenuation of α-syn aggregation was involved as well as upregulation of NRF2 similar to what the sesaminol OP study is stating on human nerve cells.

You may also like...