BMI, "Is this a good indicator of goo... - Cholesterol Support

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BMI, "Is this a good indicator of good health?"

sandybrown
sandybrown
13 Replies

Please watch (I player), "Trust me I am a doctor programme, today part one of three parts." Very interesting!

13 Replies
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MikePollard

Watched it.

Obviously there are the 'fit and fat' - generally in the shape of heavily muscled types such as rowers and rugby players. However, for the majority of the overweight or obese they know that their condition is down to their lifestyle and despair of it.

The real problem is that they are following the 'healthy whole grain good, fat bad' paradigm promoted for the last 40 years and are now in the 'fat and bewildered' category.

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Hidden
Hidden

I watched it also....but my interest failed somewhat when the second consultant talking about aspirin mentioned the side effects with that but failed to mention that statins have some very serious side effects......does he not read this blog??!! I guess there would be a few more than me shouting at the TV.

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Hidden

Given that the guy in question took neither statins or aspirin I wasn't sure I rated him very highly.

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patch14

The BMI indicators are good at giving you some idea of where you should be on the scales! but there is now a much quicker and easier (mathematically) way of judging your body mass. It has been for many years a concern among Drs that the massing of fat around the organs and the waist line is a big contributor to heart disease. It is now suggested that your waistline should be half your height! This is easier to calculate and in my case just about acceptable, as I am 5 foot 3 inches and have a waist measurement of 30! Give it a go and see whether or not you are "in the zone".

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sandybrown

All,

Where do we go to do this check?

VO2 max (also maximal oxygen consumption, maximal oxygen uptake, peak oxygen uptake or maximal aerobic capacity) is the maximum capacity of an individual's body to transport and use oxygen during incremental exercise, which reflects the physical fitness of the individual. The name is derived from V - volume, O2 - oxygen, max - maximum.

VO2 max is expressed either as an absolute rate in litres of oxygen per minute (L/min) or as a relative rate in millilitres of oxygen per kilogram of bodyweight per minute (i.e., mL/(kg·min)).

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Aliwally

I was interested in the aspirin debate as well. All through I was thinking, now wouldn't this be even more interesting if they did this with statins. However, I was disappointed when he handed Dr Michael the statin and the blood pressure drug as though to say now if you really want to lower your risk take these. No debate at all, a lost opportunity for a much more interesting discussion...maybe they didn't want that.

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sandybrown

Hi,

When the medicine came from the jacket pocket, it gave away the pre planned action!!.

All I am interested is in finding did high cholesterol and high BMI damaged my body. I am going to Singapore for a family visit, Singapore hospital do Vo2 Max for S$110.00, am planning to do this to compare all my three results.

BMI, body fat and VO2 Max.

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Penel
Penel
in reply to sandybrown

Hope you are feeing fit. m.wikihow.com/Measure-Vo2-Max

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sandybrown
sandybrown
in reply to Penel

Hello,

Thanks. fitness is the big question?

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Penel
Penel
in reply to sandybrown

Yes, being fit is very important. Losing weight and getting fit both take time and effort.

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sandybrown

All,

Have found out that Vo2 Max is to do with sports medicine programme, This is mainly available to sports people.

BBC reporter di not make this very clear or did I miss it in the programme. Have seen number of programme made by this reporter it looks very interesting during the programme but when one investigate deeper it looks very different. Can an ordinary person go for a VO2 Max testing?

There was a programme on "HIT", high intensity training, looking deeper no sure on the findings.

All I can say is we need to look after our health in a simpler way by controlling food intake and exercise. Morden living is very different, NHS needs to educate us better and change the way of thinking.

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Hidden
Hidden

Bala, I do agree about the NHS needing to educate us better. Their so called 'eatwell plate' is so misguided in my opinion. Many people would follow it without question thinking it must be right, but all that carbohydrate can't be good for anyone either trying to lose weight or worse with high blood sugar. My own daughter, a highly intelligent person would believe everything her doctor tells her without question which never fails to amaze me. How different we all are - for myself I want to know exactly what pills and potions I'm taking - and why!

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sandybrown

Hi,

Thanks. My wife a nurse, worked in the hospital will say leave it to GP, they are managing us. I do not agree! because if it it causes few problems. I am in the othere extreme nowdays! selecting waht I eat. only once in a while poridge and toasts. It has been hard work to bring weight down nad want ot keep it down. Have told my GP practice what I think about the NHS food plan, I am afraid it is difficult ot change the system. today at work they have a large meeting room to sell health and exercise. In the food section when I asked about different low cab food, answer waas you need cabs!Will trymy level best ot learn on low cab food.

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