Transplant on the horizon

My husband had his assessment for transplant in May... He was told they wanted to try him with refaximin... Also the anaesthetist wasn't too happy with his smoking. As he has stopped smoking now, they are more keen to list him as his bloods are showing a steady decline... The Prof said that he is likely to develop Cancer as his liver is in such a bad state. We worry about life after transplant... I'm worried about rejection etc

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  • Ok well life after transplant has got to be better than the alternative, I was lucky enough to get a transplant nine wks ago and life has is fantastic it's as though I've never been ill and I was very much at end stage liver failure, straight after the op I was moved onto ICU where I was very much cared for and had plenty of painkillers to hand within 36 hrs I was on a ward with other like for like patients and we all helped each other through the worries and concerns as did our wives, it was like an exclusive little club, being discharged was difficult as I was still sore etc and feeling sorry for myself but with the right advice and knowing they are just at the end of the phone I went home.

    I suppose and actually know there is a worry about rejection but they have many many anti rejection drugs and will find the one that suits you best and touch wood both myself and my new friends are all doing well, the harsh reality of not having the transplant meant I wouldn't be writing this.

    So yes it's a worrying time for patient and family but its a lot better than them burying you good luck for the future

  • My story is similar. I was transplanted after a 11 month wait and I've never felt better! I was up after 17 hours and on ward after 21. You mentioned the Proff--are you at Kings?

    I asked my doc about rejection. He said: I'm not worried about it, so why should you be? We have medicine for that.

    Good luck!! Life WILL be better after transplant! Believe it! :)

  • Hi my boyfriend went on the list was transplanted and out of hospital within a week. He had strictures in bile duct with bilirubin of 273 at highest. He luckily has had no problems since transplant . He was on front of Queen Elizabeth hospital news in transplant week. His transplant was in may although they put January in the magazine. Yes there are risks and its scary for both patient and loved ones but rest assured the surgeon and staff will do

    Everything to make him well . Xx

  • Hi there as you know there is always a chance of rejection but as mentioned above there is that many drugs available now its not really a major concern for surgeons I have had mild rejection in the past a course of iv steroids and a change of anti rejection drug sorted it I had my transplant 21 years ago when I was 14 and now lead a normal life something I couldn't do as a teenager hope all goes well for all of use

  • Just to endorse other replies: clinical staff have a variety of drugs available and seem to get it right - certainly in my experience and now 20 months on, I was well enough to have a hip replacement operation!

    Best of luck.

    Mike

  • This has all been really reassuring... Thank you... My husband also has Hep C, gtype 3 so has added worries of this... The Prof says that they will start him on treatment soon after transplant...we are at the Royal free.

  • The hep c will remain as its within your blood but it will not be as prevant and very soon there will hopefully be a different drug available for your heptologist to prescribe as opposed to interferon which as good as it is also has side effects like heavy flu like symptoms and makes you feel washed out, how do I know all this! Well Pear-shaped it could be me or a hundred others your writing about such are the similarities! On a plus point your not unique and they are used to it

  • A liver transplant will sort the hep c pretty much too our friend had his transplant a few hours after my fella and he is doing good to xx

  • Hi tracy (and pear). A transplant wont 'sort' or clear hep c, as Card says the virus is in your blood and will still be there even with a new liver. But a transplant should give pear's husband breathing space to get fit enough to undergo treatment to clear the Hep C, and Kings have done this many times for transplant patients. Good luck Pear and I hope he gets a transplant.

  • Hi all cases are differnt I m just going in what has happened at qe . Best thing to do pear is talk to consultants and co ordinators at your hospital . They will answer all concerns

  • It has been very positive to hear that people with Hep C do have hope of receiving some form of treatment, so I'm greatful to you all for your advice... I think I bombard the Profs and liver team enough! Just wanted to talk to people who have and are living it...my husband has had 1 year of interferon and ribavirin... He relapsed 3 months after finishing treatment... his platelets are so low that they can't risk another course of it. Our Prof says a new liver is needed urgently now as his own liver is extremely small in size due to the cirrhosis. He says that they will start him off on therapy as soon as for Hep C. It is reassuring though when you hear real patient/partner stories

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