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Bone Health
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What are members who took Strontium Ranelate, now taking instead?

I’ve been a member of the NOS since breaking both wrists in 2010. I was a regular forum poster until it closed down, so I’ve lost touch with most of the then, Forum members.

I’ve been taking SR since 2011 with good results, even allowing for the up to 50% Strontium DEXA scan error. I was wondering what other Tx members have decided to try, now that SR is nolonger available?

Thanks

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I have put myself on a "drug holiday". I was gutted the day we heard SR was going to be withdrawn. :( :( :(

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Bisphosphonates don't suit me so I was considering asking for strontium ranelate if my T-score gets any worse. Now that's no longer available I'm wondering whether strontium citrate would be an alternative option. Of course it wouldn't be available on prescription so would probably be quite expensive.

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Hi Met00 and Katrina. I think we were all shocked over SR going out of production. I’ve yet to find even one person who had heart, DVTs or circulatory problems from taking it. When I contacted Servier I was told the main reason they were stopping making it, was the drop in demand.

I took Drs Best Strontium Bonemaker ie Strontium Citrate, prior to getting Strontium R and didn’t have problems with it. Cannot remember the cost, but it wasn’t particularly expensive. I contacted Drs Best last year when I heard about SR going out of production and was disappointed to learn that they too were nolonger selling Strontium citrate, due to fall in sales.

It is still available from some large US suppliers if you look on the internet. Before you buy any, email them to find out if they actually make it themselves, or where they get it from.

Some of the Strontium comes from China and India is also getting in on the act. Although Strontium citrate can be found as an ore, most of the Strontium is mined as Celestine the sulphate mineral and strontianite the carbonate mineral,

I’m rather twitchy about buying unregulated supplements with a questionable origin, so presently have no idea what to do, when my SR supply runs out.

Best wishes

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Really helpful advice, thanks Lynne

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I am of the same mind as you regarding buying SC over the internet for the reasons you mention. I too was told that SR was withdrawn over a fall in demand. This presumably came about because it was not being offered to OP patients (I had to request it) and because of all the negative talk on possible side effects about this drug.

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Strontium is present in a number of foods. Info on line about strontium-rich foods. Of course some of the food based mineral is radioactive (strontium 90, thanks to atmospheric nuclear testing) but apparently not at a level to cause concern. The amount of strontium present will depend on the soil in which the plants were grown, or the feed in the case of animal products.

livestrong.com/article/2502...

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I believe it was taken off the market due to new guidance from NICE. The consultant/nurses dealing with OP were unhappy about this decision.

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Hi Mollysuki

Not directly. According to a letter I received from Servier, they stopped making it of their own accord, because of falling sale. It was also out of patent which may have influenced them.

The fact that NICE put restrictions on its use, ie only for severe cases, where bisphosphanates couldn’t be taken and assuming the patient didn’t have heart, or at risk from circulatory problems, was a nail in The SR coffin, as it affected sales. I still feel the cost came into the NICE decision, as bisphosphanates are far cheaper.

As you will gather, I still feel bitter about it and that SR uses have been abandoned because of a wrong, political decision.

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