British Heart Foundation
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Can I have some advice please

Hi I am a new member to group. I had a cardiac arrest 7 weeks. If it was not for my husband I would not be asking your advice today as he applied CPR whilst waiting for the paramedics to arrive. They had to work on me for a hour before they could stabilise me my main artery was totally blocked and they gave me a stent I have been out of hospital now for 3 weeks and I feel totally overwhelmed by the whole experience I feel low in mood teary. I am feeling dizzy a lot and my blood pressure is low. Is this normal ?. I start rehab this coming monday I`m hoping they will help with the way I am feeling

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Hello Sue, welcome to the group.

The moods are what a lot of us have/are going through. The dizziness not so much, but I would suggest it may be the low blood pressure causing this. Can you speak to your GP or to the hospital about this before the rehab begins? The whole overwhelmed feeling too is pretty normal as well, it's a huge shock to the system and to you too. It does get better, and there are some truly lovely people here only too happy to help with advice and their own experiences

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I have spoken to my doctor and for the past 3 weeks she has been juggling my medication but to no avail. My blood pressure still remains low. She has now taken me off ramipril I`m hoping that will work. It`s hard work having a young child without me going dizzy all the time . Thanks for your advice

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Hi Sue. I haven't experienced a cardiac arrest, so can't comment on that, but I was diagnosed with heart failure while pregnant and know how hard it is to look after a child when you have heart disease, low blood pressure and a huge life event to process. There's no easy answer, other than to do everything you can to be well - keep in touch with medical professionals, follow their advice, be VERY KIND to yourself and use all the help and support you are offered. In terms of low mood, I found it really helpful to talk to a professional. My heart failure clinic has a specialist psychologist in the department. I wonder if there is something similar where you are? I loved being able to talk to someone who was not related to me and who had some knowledge/understanding of my medical condition as I found it difficult and upsetting to explain my diagnosis in the early days.

It's great that you are reaching out to communities like this when everything you've gone through is still so recent. That is a great achievement in itself. Hopefully the side effects of your medication can be controlled soon and you'll start to feel better.

Good luck x

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thank you

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Also Sue,

Like others gave said, it takes a little while for meds to balance out. They can cause alot of dizziness, I know mine have at times. But yes the Gp will keep at it until it's sorted.

In the meantime, you could play a game with your little one when you feel dizzy & faint.

Hydrate with fluids

Put some music on, low key of course. Put pillows down on the floor, then lay flat while eliciting your legs.

You could both have special chil out pillows. That are just for when mummy feels faint.

Stay there for a good 10/15 minutes.

Get up slowly, the just rest for a bit.

But always make a call if symptoms don't improve :))))

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Appoliges for poor spellings, writing while walking.....

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what a good idea thanks

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I second all above.

It's great that your husband was there to do the CPR. So he needs a big pat on the back.

But I say it wasn't mean to be.

You are still here honey, I see that as a possitive. Now you have to live life to the full.

Your down days will get less as the time goes by. You've had an awful fright & it's a lot for you & your husband to take in.

By joining our club, you'll disscuver that things can only get better for you now.

You see, the medical field are on to it. Where's they didn't have a clue you had heart issues before.

So as long as you relax for a while, give your heart time to get over the trauma.

Then get yourself up & doing things, pretty much as normal. You will find life is good. Now you are on the radar & if you stick to your new health plan, diet, exorcise etc. You are going to be stronger than ever before.

Just always make sure you note down any concerns & then talk about them ether to family, friends, the medical profession, councillors or us in the club.

Honestly, life will be good again. Chin up, huge hugs Jo xx

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Aww thanks Jo . Ireally appreciate that x

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Hi Sue and welcome.

Such an event is a massive shock and most, if not all, go through the same emotions you are going through. There are so many concerns and unknowns during the early stages that it's hard to take it all in and process it. Disbelief, anger, frustration, what the future holds etc.. they're all normal things to worry about at this stage. The good news is that it does get easier.

Rehab is an important step and, crucially, will give you some confidence back. Learning that you can still do things whilst at rehab, under medical supervision, should hopefully start to improve how you feel. As well as the physical benefits, exercise aids serotonin production which improves mood. Rehab, and speaking with others in the same boat, helps you come to terms with what has happened, and realise that there is life after a heart episode. I'm not saying it's easy or that it'll be quick but it will get better. The rehab nurses are fantastic people and will be happy to help you get your head around it all.

You've found your way to a great website here with some very helpful and inspiring people who understand exactly what you're going through so you've already made a positive step.

All the best to you.

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Thank you it`s nice to know I am not alone

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Hi Sue - a lot has been answered above.

I am afraid I had more time to get used to the idea as after being diagnosed with Angina, I had an angiogram in Jan and June 2nd I had a bypass and am well into recovery (which in itself has its issues)

The low mood is something that it seems all of us feel, I am about 8/9 weeks down the road and it does get better but not gone altogether.

The medical side I cannot comment on as I had a reduction in medication after the op as my angina seems to have been sorted by the bypass and I am on beta blockers as my blood pressure is towards the high side.

It takes some time to get used to the idea of how vulnerable we all are and I know it is hard to accept at the moment but at least you know more than many others about what is going on inside your heart and you have been given a second chance.

I hope the rehab helps as you will have the chance to talk to others about what you have gone through.

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Also with the medication it is very much try and try again there are many alternatives out there, with perseverance and an understanding GP you'll get there

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Hi Sue, welcome. I am relatively new too. I am sorry to hear of your experience. You were very fortunate to have your husband there with you. I also had stenting to the left main stem, which was totally blocked also. I was very lucky as the blockage was only found whilst another artery was being stented. The main artery went into spasm during the procedure, which was extremely painful. I spent 5 days In CCU. What you are feeling is completely normal. Give yourself time to recover. Not that many years ago a blockage in the main stem would have meant CABG, of which the recovery would have been lengthly. You have been through a tough time, be kind to yourself. The rehab will be of great benefit to you. I wish you well.💜

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