Paramedic problems

I wonder if anyone else has had problems with paramedics. My son is now 5 and was formally diagnosed with asthma at aged 18months. nnThe last two occasions I have called an ambulance during an asthma attack, the paramedics have told me he it's not asthma as he is not wheezing. On both occasions he has had a classic asthma cough and been plainly struggling to breathe. On the first occasion he plainly should have been in hospital and went on to have two further terrifying attacks that night, but my confidence was so knocked I didn't dare call another ambulance. The second time last month the paramedic refused to even give him a nebuliser. Fortunately he was on the mend by the time she had arrived and managed without. nnHow do I convince these people that asthma does not only have one symptom but many, including that cough?

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  • Bless you, no advice in afraid as I have similar problem, I rarely wheeze, either cough lots or have silent chest nothing in between as its allergy triggered. Had severe attack not that long ago and paramedic gave me nebulizer until it was over and left... the ambulance never turned up! apparently that's all they do around here now!nnDoes he have dr/consultant who would write a letter you could keep copy of to show them?nnSending hugs x

  • I have had this problem and I'm an adult. I demand I go to hospital. They have never refused to take me as of yet. I don't wheeze. I'm also on home nebulisers. I've had multiple itu admissions. I tell them this I also say that I know when I'm unwell etc. I would firmly but politely say that you know your son and he is not well and you would like to get him seen if they refuse to give him a neb. If they refuse and he continues to have problems phone them back. Call as many times needed they will soon get the message that something isn't right.

  • HinnWe have had issues with paramedics in the past, I now tend to get him in the car and drive him there after the last experience, I can get him there faster.nnThe last ones we had out didnt have a working oximeter and from looking at him decided he was ok so didn't give a neb or oxygen despite my protests. They agreed to take him in to be checked over and I kept saying I think he should be on oxygen but they kept disagreeing. Half way on the longest route ever to hospital they decided actually I was probably right put him on oxygen, blue lights on and he ended up admitted on arrival and in HDU! I was even told by one call handler that my son can't possibly have been diagnosed with asthma at 3, then he asked what meds he was on and didn't have much to say after I had reeled that off as im sure he realised most 3 year olds wouldn't be on those meds without a very good reason.nnI think you just have to be firm and stick to what you believe, if you think they need to be in hospital tell them to take you there. I know that if my son has had 10 puffs and it's not making a difference then he needs to be in hospital.nnJenny x

  • I have this problem as an adult. I carry a note feel my consultant (well a picture in my phone) and get ready to argue. Ambulance protocol says that they're not supposed to nebulise without a wheeze, but they can override it. Usually if you tell them that you know that, they override it. Also, asthmatics with cough variant asthma don't wheeze, the main symptom is a cough or tight chest. If you tell them that, that sometimes helps too. nnIf things get really bad, you can complain to the ambulance service and they can have a joint case meeting with your GP and the ambulance service and put a flag on the patient's name and a treatment protocol so they have authorisation to override it. This has been really useful in my case.

  • Dear All, that is all really helpful info thank you. I need to have the courage of my convictions but will also ask my asthma nurse to write me a letter confirming his main asthma symptom is a cough. I might also get in touch with the ambulance service too.nnThanks again for all your thoughts and support.

  • I've just got off the phone with the manager at the local ambulance station. He was reassuring and helful and is bringing forward some asthma training that they had booked for October.nnThanks everyone for your help.

  • Glad you got an answer! Fc little man ddoesn't actually need them though!nnMidge xnnnn

  • I have had this problem and I'm an adult. I demand I go to hospital. They have never refused to take me as of yet. I don't wheeze. I'm also on home nebulisers. I've had multiple itu admissions. I tell them this I also say that I know when I'm unwell etc. I would firmly but politely say that you know your son and he is not well and you would like to get him seen if they refuse to give him a neb. If they refuse and he continues to have problems phone them back. Call as many times needed they will soon get the message that something isn't right.

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