LUCK or not? : Here are my numbers... - American Bone Hea...

American Bone Health: Osteoporosis
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LUCK or not?

Here are my numbers: Age today 67yrs

2007 2011 2015 2019

L hip -2.0 -2.2 -2.9 -3.3

spine -2.7 -3.3 -4.2 -4.6

Risk factors: smoke No

alcohol No

steroids No

R. arth. No

GI disease No

DM No

Hx of Fx No

family hx No

secondary osteo No

I have declined prescriptions. I do weight lifting, aerobics, yoga and take 630 mg of Citrical every day, Vit. D 2000 iu every other day. I jump rope, broad jump and 8 years ago, I fell on my coccyx while running backwards on a concrete garage floor with no fracture.

What do you think?

9 Replies
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Sounds like you are in pretty darn good health and you've been blessed! I don't know what is considered dangerously low but I'd be concerned about the broad jump it seems high impact for spine and hips...but I'm not a Doctor.

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Thank You Bettyboop, I am researching and praying daily to make the best decision.

1 like
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Your aerobic and jumping exercises may be too stressful for your spine now.

Also add magnesium, vit K2 and Boron to your diet as they help the calcium in your diet and vit d absorb into the bones. Be careful of calcium supplements as it can cause other issues I try to get calcium from my daily fiod. Some walk with a weighted vest and find that helpful to build up strength.

I am new to osteoporosis and I find reading many of the past posts and make note of the links many have posted Tgey are very helpful. They suggest websites such as Better Bones and also many books. It was beneficial to me to take the time to go through past posts.

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read "Osteoporosis Treatment:An Evidence-Based Approach" Journal of Gerontological Nursing, authors disclose no sig. financial interest. Ordered "What your doctor may not tell you about osteoporosis"(Warner)--Thanks for diet tips and cautions!

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It sounds like you were lucky. And luck can change. (Did you watch the Kentucky Derby?)

Have you input your data into a fracture risk calculator? You can acceess the American Bone Health's calculator (FRC) on their website -- americanbonehealth.org. You might run the assessment with your data from 8 years ago and again with your current data to see how your risk has changed.

The weightlifting, (low-impact) aeorbics, and yoga are great. Jump rope and broad jump may a bit more of a concern. Miriam Nelson, in her book Strong Women, Strong Bones, suggests that those jumping activities are good for premenopausal women with good balance.

If you are at high risk of a fracture (based on the FRC), then high-impact exercise may not be the best actiivity because of the possibility of an impact-related fracture and the danger of a fall. (And even those of us with great balance - like me - have fallen.)

Keep up the good work with exercise, diet, calcium, and vitamin D. Try to get most of your calcium from food, and use supplements to make up the difference between your food and the RDA. Vitamin D does probably require a supplement.

Good luck (no pun intended) decision.

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I have refused meds since 2007. This years calculation tool FRAX score numbers for me are : Major osteoporotic 11%

Hip fracture 5.5 %

My femoral neck T-score I entered was -3.3

I plugged in a fake T-score of -2.4 and the #s were Major osteoporotic 6.4%

Hip fracture 2.2%

Thank Yo

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P.S. There are still some moderate impact activities that are safe: dancing

, hiking,

stair climbing

.

I saw a group of women (mostly in their 70s and 80s linedancing at a senior center last week.

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This may interest you. healthunlocked.com/pmrgcauk...

Also, has your doctor investigated possible causes for your worsening bone density, given your active and healthy lifestyle? Parathyroid issues?

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Heron, you are my kind of girl. I have refused meds since 2007. This years calculation tool FRAX score numbers for me are : Major osteoporotic 11%

Hip fracture 5.5 %

My femoral neck T-score I entered was -3.3

I plugged in a fake T-score of -2.4 and the #s were Major osteoporotic 6.4%

Hip fracture 2.2%

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