Ablation and dementia risk: Something I wasn... - AF Association

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Ablation and dementia risk

tcpace
tcpace

Something I wasn't previously aware of is that catheter ablation raises the risk of developing dementia (see article below). Fortunately, warfarin and oral anti-coagulants offset that risk significantly so, after an ablation, it's wise not to think in terms of trying to get off them. My wife once tried to but her EP was extremely insistent that she shouldn't but didn't say why. Maybe he had the dementia risk in mind.

escardio.org/The-ESC/Press-...

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BobD
BobDVolunteer

I thought this was well understood. Most EPs now perform ablation whilst the patient is anticoagulated to minimise any micro embolii wich may form during the precedure, It is these thought to cause a measure of vascular dementia,

The continuation of anticoagulants post ablation is actually more about contnued stroke prevention as there is no evidence that ablation removes stroke risk. Some people with low or zero Chadsvasc scores may be able to stop if anticoaguoants were only started for the purpose of the ablation but most of us look on them as our best friend..

karim123
karim123
in reply to BobD

You always there for us the. Karim

Wouldn't this apply to any such procedure or operation? Why would it be specifically to do with ablations?

tcpace
tcpace
in reply to Cyrtis

Probably but how many other surgical procedures would involve taking Warfarin or an anti-coag subsequently? The thrust of the article is that RF ablation increases dementia risk but anti-coagulants offset that risk - hence a good reason to continue taking them even if your Chadvasc score might suggest you could stop taking them.

MarkS
MarkS
in reply to Cyrtis

There appears to be an extra risk with ablations because the catheter tends to produce clouds of particles when it is heating the heart muscle. Also the left atrium pumps blood to the left ventricle where it then goes round the body with a direct line to the brain. That is why it is essential to continue anti-coagulation throughout ablations and not stop on the morning or use heparin bridging as some EPs still do.

BobD
BobDVolunteer
in reply to Cyrtis

Not really. The actual burns can cause small amounts of debris to form I understand which the anticoagulant reduces.

Thank you for a link to an interesting article

J (-:

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