Horseback riding and anticoagulants - AF Association

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Horseback riding and anticoagulants

Hoski
Hoski
81 Replies

In a couple months Im going to get a new knee. Im almost 66 and on anticoagulant for life, thankyou a fib. We have horses, but with age my riding has diminished to nice weather riding around our place for an hour on my calm trusty horse. If I ever fall off, it would probably b my fault as my horse if very dependable. Both heart and ortho docs say I can continue riding, " just dont fall off". All my horsey friends would never ever consider giving up riding. Im a retired nurse, so I look at things from too many perspectives and self doubt myself way too much.

Im telling you all this to solicit objective opinions on whether one should be wise and give up riding OR make quality of life and enjoyment supercede safety and continue riding??? It's a coin toss for me and I would love input from other anticoagulant takers😉

I added pic of my boy Brumby, he takes good care of me.

81 Replies
oldestnewest
oyster

Do you gallop or jump? Anything other than a steady trot?

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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to oyster

No, only slow trot and walk

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oyster
oyster
in reply to Hoski

Well I imagine it must be hard to fall off a slowly trotting horse unless he bolts. Initially you will have some quads weakness presumably after your new knee which I imagine could affect the mount.

Your chances of a life threatening head injury wearing a helmet must be less than from falling down the stairs without one. I imagine the odds of either accident are similar for you.

Are you getting pressure from your partner and looking for moral support here?🙂

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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to oyster

Just looking for support, part of me thinks I worry too much, the other part asks " what would the average person do?". I fight with anxiety, I didnt used to b this indecisive in my younger years!!! Thankfully, when Im on my horse, Im in the moment and dont have a worry in the world, lol.

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fibber-me
fibber-me
in reply to Hoski

Funny you should say that. I struggle with indecisiveness to an extreme I think.

I am sure that it is related to anxiety. I am now on Buspirone to help me with that. I think you should ride with protection like a helmet and padding.

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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to fibber-me

Yes I didnt really feel much anxiety til a fib entered my life 3 yr ago. Its more trouble than the a fib. Im much better now. Thanks for your input!

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jeanjeannie50

No, don't give up your horse riding, unless you keep falling off or intend to go over jumps? Just how many times have you fallen off the horse you have now?

As Oyster has said you've more chance of doing more damage tripping down the stairs, or just falling over in general.

Jean

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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to jeanjeannie50

I havent fallen off in years and I wear my helmet. I agree with you and Oyster, just think I needed to hear it from someone else!! I would grieve not riding even though I dont do it as much now, but it does give me great pleasure. Thanks!

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TamlaMotown
TamlaMotown
in reply to Hoski

It would be such a great shame to miss out on something as fabulous as horse riding. Follow your heart Hoski 🤗

Can we have a pic of 🐎 😆

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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to TamlaMotown

Thats the response I was hoping to see! I will see if I can figure out how to add a pic

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ticking-ticker

Well may I be the devils advocate here - you are/have been a trained nurse and know what anti coagulants do so ask whether you have had any bruising lately. I take similar medication after heart surgery and can say I have had some terrific bruises doing what I have done before in my life and very normal things too. The experts say that just because you have/have had a problem, does not mean that (with care) you should not lead a perfectly normal life. So with that in mind go try and get an insurance policy for your horse riding and, since you are an honest person, disclose the replacement knee and the drugs you are on and see what happens. If you love horse riding so much and wan't to risk your future health, who should stand in your way? Even with a crash helmet on, a fall from height could easily result in a bleed on the brain or indeed anywhere else. Even footballers are past their best at 30/40 - You know what you could lose you should, with a clear head, do a simple risk assesment and decide if the risk is worth it.

My wife is very unsure on a horse and because of this was given the most placid nag the stables had on their books to go on a half days trek by Loch Lomond that I was really looking forward to. I still remember the riderless horse that sped past her old nag back towards the stables and how her nag just took off at a full gallp through the fields - my wife sticking like glue to the back of the horse, with bunches of mane in one hand and tail in another. The lasting memory is that high pitched scream she was able to make like some deranged ghost hunter as she and the horse approached a hedge at full gallop. Both she and horse managed to clear the hedge and they did slow down as it got back to the stables.

She was praised for staying on - had to be helped off the horse and immediately given a chair to sit on. The owner of the stables saying how shocked she was since the horse had never done that before. She could hardly walk for about two days and when given a cup of tea, could hardly hold the cup as she was shaking so much - I personally have never laughed so much in all my life as I viewed the scene from an advantage point on a hill, although I have never told her that and never will - animals are unpredictable, heavy and do scare relatively easily. That was 30 years ago and have never been near a horse since. It is really your decision but please do be realistic.

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Hoski

Yes, thats the hard part. I told my hubby one good fall and it could be lights out. I just ride at home now so that eliminates outside interference. It is an internal struggle in my thoughts, I could play both sides of the argument and win either side!

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BobD
BobDVolunteer
in reply to Hoski

Sorry to be late to the party but just been up to Stonliegh for Race Retro (380miles round trip plus walking all day). Live your life not what others might want of you. I have been on warfarin for 15 years and still build race engines and work with machinery and yesterday I pcked up a piece of metal which cut my finger inside a knuckle. Quick plaster and move on. OK as others have said a fall on your head may not be a great idea so learn not to land on your head! I went a pearler in the yard last weekend because I wasn't paying attention and landed on one buttock and an elbow but I fall so well that my head never touched the ground until I laid it gentle on the gravel as I started swearing.

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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to BobD

You always crack me up and you speak wisdom. Deep down in my heart I know I need to keep riding. I just need to get out of my head sometimes. Thanks!

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TamlaMotown
TamlaMotown
in reply to Hoski

What a great pic. He or she is beautiful 😊

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windsor1944
windsor1944
in reply to Hoski

Imagine the Queen Elizabeth still rides at her age. I'm on blood thinners too, in fact I just found out yesterday I have another blood clot in my right leg. That is 4 blood clots in a year. If you get surgery they will have to stop your blood thinners for a while

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CDreamer

Some great replies - all I can add is when you stop living you start dying so live your life and if that for you is riding - enjoy!

It sounds as though you are not being foolhardy and have considered and acknowledged the risks but recognise them as minimal.

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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to CDreamer

I agree

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MIC1

I am 61, and I have played ice hockey for over 50 years. When I started taking Eliquis at 59 for afib, my cardiologist told me to sell my hockey equipment and stop playing. I stopped playing for 3 months and was miserable. When I went to my first appointment with an electrophysiologist, he told me that I could play hockey as long as I wear a helmet. He said that "if you get hit with a puck, it might bruise a little more and take longer to heal, but you won't die." So far he has been right. The interesting thing that he told me was that I should not start playing a "new" sport.

Since I don't horseback ride, I can't comment on the risks associated with the sport. In my case, I have played hockey for over 50 years, and I know how to protect myself and not put myself into dangerous situations. If you own a horse, I assume you know how to safely ride and you have been riding for years (i.e., it is not a "new" sport), but falling from a horse and getting hit with a puck pose different risks. I would, however, wear a helmet.

As an interesting aside, I did not follow my electrophysiologist's advice, and, at 60, I started indoor, track cycling at a local velodrome. I wore a helmet, of course. But, this was a "new" sport, and I honestly did not feel comfortable going on a 50 degree bank, clipped in, at 25 mph. I saw one horrific crash that resulted in broken bones and a concussion, even with a helmet. Luckily, I was not on the track at the time. Needless to say, I have not been to the velodrome since!

I hope that tis response helps. Good luck with your decision.

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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to MIC1

I am strongly leaning toward continuing riding my horse. Back in my younger days we would trail ride in some back country where there wasnt even cell phone reception. Now I just putter around our small acerage and pretend Im somewhere else, lol. Im not much of a risk taker but love spending time with my 1200 lb pet, lol.

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MIC1
MIC1
in reply to Hoski

That sounds great. If I owned a horse, I would wear a helmet and ride! I think that the compromise is to ride safely, wear a helmet, don't put yourself in a dangerous situation, and enjoy the thing that you love to do.

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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to MIC1

Thanks so much! I guess I just needed to hear that from people that understand the weird things we a fibbers get to think about!

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to MIC1

My sentiments exactly and you said it in about 10 paragraphs less than I did!😊.

irina

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carneuny

G'day Hoski,

You are asking the wrong person here 'cos I'm a natural born risk taker. Like BobD, for me life is for living ..... absolutely.

I'm 74, I too have a new knee and I take risks .... I still work 30 to 40 hours a week driving buses, there is the ever present risk of an accident, from falling out of the bus by my own carelessness or from a motor traffic accident, or heaven forbid, getting mugged by a passenger.

I have two personal identifiers (in the event of my being rendered unconscious), one in my wallet and the other a dog tag both giving my AF and anticoagulation data.

Also, you would appear to have the medical knowledge and skills to deal with things, so on balance........... go live it up with your horsey.

John

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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to carneuny

I will go bravely and live it up! Maybe a new knee will give me new energy. How is your knee?

Thankyou John

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carneuny
carneuny
in reply to Hoski

Hiya Hoski,

Good one, that's what we like ..... go for it and live a little, OR live alot depending on your approach to life, I try and live alot :-) I'm greedy !!!

My new knee. I had a partial knee replacement, right knee, medial compartment. Brilliant. I had it done early Nov 2015. In my party bag of drugs is Warfarin (Coumadin to you guys ). I was back at work driving buses in 11 weeks. No sweat ! Warfarin, AF, just a walk in the park .... no worries.

Post op ..... you just got do exercises, and keep on doing them til you cry your eyes out.

You also got to get on top of scar tissue.

I got my sports injury massage therapist ( once dressing was off and I was declared free of infection) to massage the incision line and surrounding area in an attempt ensure that scar tissue doesn't form. They don't tell you to do this in hospital BUT its vital. STOP SCAR TISSUE FORMING at all costs.

Anyway that's it - good luck with your horsey and your new knee .... may the force be with you.

John

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to carneuny

Has anyone used a supplement called 'serrapeptase' to lessen scar formation and help healing in general?

I am going to ask my ortho surgeon if I can start this before surgery.

Apparently it is made from silkworms and is an enzyme they produce to help them breakdown and breakout from their cocoons.

From my reading it has been used with success in Japan for years to help break down fibrinogen/fibrin which is what makes up scar tissue.

Ir seems as we age and add more healed injuries and scarring to our bodies-especially on the inside- we have a lot of fibrin which causes stiffness and lesser mobility in general.

Maybe I should have started a new thread but the subject seemed to me to be appropriate for better knee surgery healing and increased mobility overall.

Anyone! Please feel free to start a new thread if it will generate more replies. From my reading I am ready to order a bottle and start it now before surgery in April.

Re better healing let me share a story. In the 60's I had a rhinoplasty (slang-nose job). It's a small operation done under local -a simple plastic surgery procedure but there is a lot of swelling,swollen black and blue eyes, and bruising in general for a week or two post op..

The surgeon gave me pills before and after that were supposed to minimize the bruising and swelling. They certainly did. My swelling, etc lasted only 2-3 days and was very much less than expected. And my eyes were never swollen shut.

The pills were made from a pineapple enzyme (bromelain) and papaya enzyme (papain) which are known to promote faster healing with less scarring and bruising. These pills were used for a short time and then I never saw them prescribed again. And haven't been able to discover the name.

I'm wondering if this serrapeptase is a second or third generation of these pills. I'm still researching but would love to give them a try. Supposedly the serrapeptase works on old and new scar buildup (of fibrin) and helps people walk and move better with less pain and stiffness.

Grateful for any input. irina

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carneuny
carneuny
in reply to Hidden

Hiya irina,

Just a few 'off the head' comments. Why not leave this on here, it is in context after all, well sort of, my point is that this has emerged from Hoskis post on heart, anticoagulation and her horseys and sometimes things just don't always fit as neatly as we'd like ....BUT then in addition start a new thread, both on here AND particularly on another forum which deals with arthritis and knee surgery.

If I were not already stable with my AF and coping with the medication just fine I would probably have given this a try at the time of my knee surgery. What the medical teams don't explain very well with knee surgery is the precise relationship between exercises they give you, the frequency you need to do them, and this very necessary thing of preventing scar tissue forming.

John

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to carneuny

Thank you, John I will add appropriate threads tomorrow (its 1am here-time to sleep.)

I did some reading on bromelain which is available under the name 'PHLOGENZYME'. Webmd.com said it can increase bleeding and to stop it 2 weeks before surgery. So I will ask if I can do this then restart after 2-3 weeks post op when the chance of bleeding is diminished.

Those afibbers on anticoagulants would probably not qualify-ask your doctor.

I am lucky as I had my atrial appendage closed with a Watchman device in Jan 2018 so tho in permanent afib and have a pacemaker I don't take any anticoagulants anymore. irina

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Teddy2015

Hi Hoskins.As the Sister of a horse lover who’s kids did gymkanas etc I understand how to give your riding up will feel.Love riding myself as well.Iv just googled your question & got an article in the “horse & hound”interesting read.Maybe have a look at it.Good luck x

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Teddy2015

Sorry Hoski predictive txt 😡

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reinaway

No no no! Never give up what is obviously the love of your life! I have ridden and loved horses all my life and did not even think of giving up my passion! You keep going for it on your lovely dependable looking horse!😉😉

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Hidden
Hidden

Lovely picture & I’m sure the freedom of riding must be fantastic, but.....I wouldn’t risk either of my lovely new knees for anything. I don’t ever want to go back to the restrictions that my old worn out knees placed on me.

Is the pleasure worth the risk?

Think the riding position could be very uncomfortable after the op - replacement knees don’t operate in quite the same way as a natural knee.

Pony & trap?

Prince Philip can still drive one of those if he can’t now drive his car!

See how you feel after the op and remember, exercise, exercise, exercise.

I started bending my new knees as soon as I was awake enough after surgery and before the spinal fully wore off. I was walking without a stick 2-3 weeks after both surgeries.

Much love Pat x

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Hidden

Happy you are doing so well. Sounds like you had both done at once. Very brave. It's reassuring to hear positive stories of others' knee results. It's a scary operation and my 'what ifs' do intrude. I guess nurses, at least true for me, sometimes have just enough knowledge to drive ourselves nuts.

Take care. irina

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Redbull45

Just enjoy your self life is for living

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Stnerhno
Stnerhno
in reply to Redbull45

I'm going to live , live, live until die.....

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Fruitcake100

Pad your knee out, keep riding your trusty steed, it will be hard at first and you will need a sturdy mounting block but it will mentally damage you more if you stop. I stopped and regret it . Good luck.

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Fruitcake100

My thought exactly. Complete healing and gaining full mobility of the knee might take a few months but the whole purpose of the new knee joint is to give us back the ability to use our new knee is ways that were becoming difficult before replacement.

Ride horses, swim, dive, skip the missionary position, retire our walkers and enjoy our new found mobility!👍😊

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Fruitcake100

One other thing , having just read through posts, as I am sure you know, never at your stage ride a riding school horse on a treck, pack mentality takes over, hence the event of the poor lady in the letter below.

If one horse is frightened and runs , most often the rest will follow.

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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to Fruitcake100

Brumby and I just play around in our arena, nothing dramatic. Our days of going on adventures are over. I do have a mounting platform which helps alot.

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Hoski

Another thought. After the knee is completely healed I bet getting on and off Brumby will strengthen the knee ligaments too.

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dedeottie

Hi. Whilst I partly agree with those that say just live your life , In my case, I also gave consideration to what my family thought.

So, I have owned and ridden young and competion horses all my life. I am now 63 and when diagnosed I was 55 and already had 3 TIAs so was put on anticoagulants. My stroke consultant wouldnt prescribe anything other than asprin if I was going to continue riding the horses. Although this was a big incentive to stop it did occurr to me that I could tell him one thing and do another!

My family strongly wanted me to give up including my huband who also rides and he felt so strongly that he was prepared to give up with me. At the time we had 3 young horses at various stages of training and one old schoolmaster who was safety itself and I always said I would put my granny on him. So while I was making my mind up I rode the old schoolmaster who unbelievably tripped on a stone while hacking out. He went down on his knees and I went straight over his head! I was bruised(very) and battered but avoided hitting my head bt putting my hands out first. That helped me to make the decission. Over the next year we sold all the horses. One I gave to a very old friend and Inow am able to watchher compete her. The old horse was retired with another friend. We then completely changed our lives by selling our house and land and moving to the South Wales coast to be near our grandchildren, a decission I will never regret.

Yes I badly miss my life with horses and the social life that went with it. My life has changed in many ways but in some ways for the better. I am alive to watch my grandchildren growing up.

I know this is not what you want to hear and you will make up your own mind but I couldnt let your post pass me by.

We are all different and have different outlooks on life. I never thought I would make this choice but when the chips were down, I did.

I wish you all the best with whatever you decide. X

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Peddling
Peddling
in reply to dedeottie

I completely identify with your story dedeotti. Horses were my life since the age of 4. Giving up was like cutting off a limb. I did it, not because of anticoagulants or any other heart related issue, but because of osteoporosis. I choose not to follow the medication route, because I strongly believe that alendronic acid was a feature of my begetting AF. I choose to take the dietary route, but know that a fall may break or fracture a bone/bones and it is the fear of paralysis that has unseated me. It is the primary issue and I think if it was simply a question of af medication I probably would continue. I know I could trip on the stairs or over a curb but that would just be bad luck, not something I could control. My granddaughter has just taken on her second pony and begs me to ride out...it’s agony to have to say no. Many of the previous posts had me thinking ‘yeah, I could do that’. So thank you for your’s for bringing me back to reality - my reality that is.

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Peddling

Go for it. Putting off good times with your granddaughter for "just in case" isn't living.

After you're gone she'll have lots of good memories.

xx irina

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dedeottie
dedeottie
in reply to Peddling

Im glad to have struck a note with you, I was beginning to feel a bit of a killjoy! I have come to believe in fate:

As it turns out, after I had sold the horses and moved to South Wales I was diagnosed with severe osteoporosis in my spine so I probably would have stopped riding regardless of the anticoagulants. Moving when I did enabled me to be at my grandchildrens side hours after their birth and I have a very different relationship with them than if I had lived 5 hours away.

I bet your grandaughter is pleased just to have you around the horses ( doing the jobs no doubt) x

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to dedeottie

It sounds to me like something was nudging you to South Wales and you listened.

I truly believe the Universe whispers to us what our next move should be even if it doesn't seem 'logical' to us or family/friends.

Gut feelings are sometimes our best brains (the gut-brain connection). I try to always listen to my intuition and things fall into place.

When I was much younger and tried to function purely on logic and knowledge I could really make a mess of things.

irina

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dedeottie
dedeottie
in reply to Hidden

I agree.x

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Happywalker

Oh, don't give up riding. I see you ride western style which makes you fairly secure in the saddle. I envy you as I don't have access to horse riding anymore having moved from Africa to England.

I hope you new knee lets you carry on enjoying your self for many more years. You have to take risks in life in order to enjoy it.

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Chicos

I had both knees replaced 7 months ago at age 67. I gave PAF and take a blood thinner.

I was in a local grocery store and hit my big toe on the bottom of the cart...it bled(looked like a small scratch) for over an hour! It's been over 4 months and the area is still very tender.

I hope all goes well with your surgery but suggest you think long and hard about the "what ifs"

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Bloodredroses

I stood on upturned plug (in the dark) never did it again. Big hole in sole of foot, bled like a fountain for 4/5 hours, not an artery so not worried . Googled to use ice and Vaseline!! It did stop . If gushing must go to hospital !!

Horse rider: it pushes knees in an outward position right? You won’t ‘want’ to do that or simply May no be able to with artificial knee?? They don’t function anatomically exactly as a real Knee, correct? As one reply suggests , to go through what is necessary to get knew knee ( it’s fairly brutal if you think about it, would you risk it . I had a friend who has artificial hip, carried on riding motorbikes in Asia!! Had a crash, messed bone right up . Surgeon was incensed . Had to repeat operation with new surgeon . Ridic ! Go figure .

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Bloodredroses

I've seen the new replacements-very much different that the early ones I remember seeing in the OR. The ones I saw earlier this month in my surgeon's office rotate in all directions-like a ball bearing. They give an incredible range of motion ability. They are much smaller and better designed than even ones from several years ago.

And the post op exercises (physical therapy) are also designed to strenghen the ligaments om either side of the kneecap in order to strengthen the knee in general and increase range of motion. I think the one thing I won't be able to go back to are high heels. No great loss!

The doctor will tell you the more you exercise the knee after surgery the better overall result you will have. No need to baby the knee after it has completely healed.

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Hidden
Hidden

It's quite a dilemma, but when I heard the tale dedeottie relates some years ago I found it very inspiring. You can give up something that has been the centre of your life and find there are other ways forward and that what you loved took up so much time that it prevented you from doing other things you find you enjoy.

The thing is, is riding safely really riding or is it merely sitting on a horse?

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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to Hidden

Brumby and I play various games, one is " dont make me pick up the rein". My ultimate goal is to be able to direct him( in the arena) with just my body cues, not using my hands. He used to be a rental horse, following the horse in front of him. It took me awhile just to get him to think independently and not need something to follow.

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Hoski

How nice to see him develop into a thinker!

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kyoom

What a beautiful picture !

At 66 you are still young and should be enjoying life to the best of your ability.

I am 71 post MI'S x2,surgery CABG and stents.

I am still doing my 3 to 4 miles a day walking/ jogging outside as best as I can.

Sometimes the temp in Toronto is minus 15C but I still go out.

My wife things that I am a bit stubborn.But when I am on my walk (1 hour) I am in my own space and my anxiety is at it's lowest.

Keep on riding.

Wishing you all the best.

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Aufgeblassen

I can't say about the horse riding, but I would have an ablation to fix the AF FIRST, because before surgery, you will be required to be OFF any forms of blood thinners, including many supplements. When I had my knee replaced a few weeks ago, I was required to be off them for a full ten (10) days. You are at risk for a heart attack or stroke being off them for that long.

Another consideration, is that your cardiologist must clear you for the surgery, and he/she may not.

After all, a bad knee is NOT life threatening, while AF can be. While after an ablation, one is required to be on blood thinners for typically 6 months (just as a precaution), I would think a month or so after an ablation, you could safely be off them for 10 days, monitoring your AF with a blood pressure cuff (that indicates AF) a few times a day during that 10 day period.

Good luck!

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Hidden
Hidden

Hi Hoski. I haven't been posting much lately- feeling depressed over things and isolating both physically and from social media but want to share my feelings about your post. Not advising just sharing.

I also am a retired nurse and,like you, sometimes tend to overthink things based on my nursing knowledge. This doesn't always work in my favor as I do best with decisions based on my intuition rather than logic. I've learned that after I've looked at a situation logically and taken into account medical information for me things turn out better when I go with my gut feelings.

That said I will be 75 in March and I am also facing the first of 2 knee replacements the first one in April. I have a pacemaker and a successful ablation and feel ready for the knee surgery as my cardiac status is stable.

The one difference is I don't take anticoagulants anymore as in Jan 2018 I had a Watchman device inserted. I understand the real fear of bleeding from anticoagulants but that is not the gist of my reply.

It sounds like quality of life for you involves being able to ride your wonderful horse. Over a period of time I have developed my own definition of quality of life-much of which family and others disagree with. They want me to be safe and live a long time; a worthy goal but I have caveats about HOW I want to live.

I am terrified of the knee surgery-not because of the surgery itself- but because I worked many years in an operating room and though most of the time this surgery is successful in the long run (restoring function and mobility) sometimes it isn't-making us less mobile and more dependent on others. I know this feeling comes from much overthinking of the situation so I am going to have the surgeries.

But the one thing I DON't want even if it ensures a longer time on this earth is having to live in assisted living or a nursing home. I've lived in an independent senior community for the last 2 years and have plans to move out when my knees are done.

This works for many people but I hate it. I am an introvert, need a lot of alone time away from large groups of people, can't tolerate too much social chit chat or noise in general-you get the picture. So for me any kind of group living with lots of people interactions daily is intolerable. Something I learned about myself after living here.

My quality of life is to live peacefully by myself with the ability to limit my daily interactions with others who I may not like and who I am forced to see daily-in the elevator, the lobby, etc. I feel best reading, watching my DVD's, and having interesting conversations 1 on 1 with interesting people who have something of interest to say. I would rather leave this earth sooner than later if I am forced to live in a monitored crowded environment where gossip and sometimes bullying is the order of the day.

So my answer to you is figure out what gives YOU joy in your life and what doesn't. Then make your choices according to what you want-not what others think you should do.

If life will seem bleak to you without riding your horses I say keep riding. One thing I believe all of us learn just by living many years is none of us know how we will die. Or even what illnesses will come our way. So we can't live in fear. Life has a way of happening while we are making other plans. Why worry about a fall from a horse or, for me, swimming in the ocean (sharks) or living alone where there will be no staff to check if I'm alive because they don't see me for 2 days.

I don't worry about how I will die. I only ask God to please keep me out of nursing homes and let me be independent to the end.

I collect sayings and one that may be a little maudlin but is meaningful to me is a Russian proverb that says: "If it is your destiny to hang you will not drown."

Sorry to be so lengthy. Probably a selfish post on my part as I feel better getting this out of my system.

So think about what quality of life means to you and enjoy your beautiful horse.

Take care and good luck to both of us re our upcoming knee surgeries. irina

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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to Hidden

You dont know how much your post means to me irina! We understand each other. I am fortunate to be living with my hubby of almost 41 yr so that helps me alot. He wants me to do what makes me happy. Im leaning towards continuing to ride Brumby. It's funny, the bigger risk is the anticoagulant but its the new knee I dont want to break with a fall!!! We nurses are weird people. We are experts at meeting everyone elses needs. I think you and I are much alike. Im not excited about getting a new knee but they tell me Im doing further damage to my bones if I dont do it. I do believe God is in control ultimately so I also listen for his whispers in my ear. I hope you will keep in touch and let me know how your surgery goes.I will pray for you. Thankyou SO much for sharing your heart with me! You have alot to offer so dont bury yourself too far away from us💜💜💜

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Hoski

Writing this post has reminded me to not isolate so much. I sometimes need a little time off from things to recharge but I'm back.

I think I look at death a little differently. (Out of the box, maybe?)

As everyone here is over 62 often people die in their sleep and are discovered the next day (or even 2 days later). Many people here lament how awful this is but I believe sometimes we are given the gift of dying quickly and peacefully. This is difficult for the ones left behind but how often as nurses have we seen people near death who are surrounded by family and friends encouraging them to "not leave us!". The person is ready to move on and if the family takes 15 minutes to rundown to the cafeteria for coffee and a quick bite the patient dies peacefully as soon as he/she has the room to himself.

I would rather die doing something I enjoy instead of in a nursing home or other clinical cold environment where some charged with my care really shouldn't be taking care of anyone.

I'm from South Florida and , tho I'm currently in Atlanta, my daughter, sister, nieces, nephews are in Florida. I'm considering moving after 'the knees' as my surgeons are here. I love swimming in the deep ocean (off the boat) and always hope I will see dolphins swimming near.

I think dying with animals would be a special way for me to move on.

I'm open to PM's. We are on the same page and probably have similar views about illness, healthcare,etc.

Take care. irina🐱

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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to Hidden

Yes moving back to Florida sounds like a good goal.

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Hoski

Years ago there was a book written that addressed how healthcare people take good care of others but are dreadful sometimes about our own care. The title is : "I'm dying to take care of you." Probably out of print but worth a read if you find a copy.

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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to Hidden

I just ordered it on amazon( used), free shipping only $7. Thanks!! Probably should have read it 30 yr ago, lol

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Hidden
Hidden

And think of Brumby's quality of life without you.

1 like
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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to Hidden

Yes you are so right, he comes right up to the gate when he see's me outside. Now if Brumby could post on here, he would probably say he would like me to finish my weight loss goals!!!

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Hoski

So lead him to the computer! LOL

1 like
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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to Hidden

🤣🤣🤣

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Franny50

Carpe diem!

(One of the few phrases I remember from Latin class a million years ago)

I was (am) a cyclist at 69, and still ride, though not fast and not far. Used to do 100 mile bike rides and enjoyed every second. Now I"m lucky if I can do 25 miles, but when I have a good day in the sun and can do some distance, I feel on top of the world.

My regret is that I never had a horse. What wonderful creatures they seem to be.

Never give up what you love.

2 likes
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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to Franny50

I had to look this up, yes I agree!! Thankyou💜

car·pe di·emDictionary result for carpe diem

/ˌkärpā ˈdēˌem/Submit

exclamation

used to urge someone to make the most of the present time and give little thought to the future.

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Hoski

Seize the Day. We are having so many mass shootings here in the US I am constantly reminded we could go out for a hamburger and never make it home. irina

1 like
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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to Hidden

Yes, we went to a local play last night, I looked around for exits " just in case"... sad.

1 like
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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Hoski

Yes but necessary. We've had to become hypervigilant. I look around to see if anyone looks or acts odd and move away. Even couples arguing in the store.

Remember not too long ago someone got shot during a domestic argument in Walmart.

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Hoski

Seize the day, or as my brother & sister in law have called their house by the sea, ‘Seas the Day’!

Pat x

1 like
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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to Hidden

Love that👍🏻

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plopper

Ride, don't stop living!

1 like
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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to plopper

👍🏻

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bobtheblade

Hoski, I'm 71 coming up to 72 and riding sport motorbikes ( pretty d*** fast) most weeks; without even the slightest thought of the Rivaraboxan inside me. I've been riding since I was 16 and have little thought of packing up ever !! Albeit that I'm to have an operation on my thumb base in a weeks time because of the difficulty and pain of using the clutch and gripping the handlebars. Keep young and do what you can before it's no longer possible. There may be too much time in the future to do sat around nothing and it may be down to nature and old age, not because of something that you've done.

Best wishes, Bob

1 like
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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to bobtheblade

Great points! Thanks!

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southerngirl

I'm a nurse as well. Ride and enjoy. You're probably more likely to trip and hit your head than to fall off that lovely horse! Live!

1 like
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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to southerngirl

Thankyou! Im feeling much more confident 👍🏻

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Brianboru

Do it while you can, because you can. Life is too short

1 like
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Hoski
Hoski
in reply to Brianboru

Yes, you are so right!

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