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AF Association
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Slightly unnerved,some kind person told me we have 45% more chance of dementia with AF esp.in those who start it under 65?

Feeling fed up,can it get any worse?? If we manage AF well with meds and interventions,surely that awful figure is reduced? Didnt ask where they had the i formation from,but a quick google search seemed to bring up some correlation.

Thought it best not to keep reading,as they were very academic papers,and im probably scaring myself silly.

Just wondered if anyone knew anything about this.

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I read some time back that there was a chance of micro-emboli infusing the brain and causing a degree of impairment but as I remember the infomation was sketchy.

The trouble with statistics is that 45% more chance sounds really ominous - until you analyse exactly what that could mean. If an individual's chance is 1 in 100,000, then a 45% increase is minimal but 1 in 100 might be more significant.

Like you, I decided I had more immediate and important things to worry about and that includes avoiding doom-saying people quoting statistics which they don't understand any more than I do!!! BobD might have more info on this, if he's about.

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Thank you Finvola,that does make sense,yes. I didn't think of how statistics can be read in different ways,and as you say,45%of what?? I was a bit down and frazzled today...then to hear that from a 'friend' was a little unsettling.

You are right,keep calm and carry on! I went to my Tai Chi class this evening,did me a lot of good.Only been going a few weeks,recommended.

Thank you again

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Sorry I wasn't. My feeling is that IF that statistic is right and never believe anything you read on the internet as Einstien once said. it would apply only to untreated AF. Anticoagulation is not only important for stroke prevention which is why we are so keen on it.

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Hi Bob, I think that must have some basis too,untreated Af was basically what my mum and gran had,although no dementia,both died of huge strokes.I was very glad to finally get on Apixaban.I am taking positive steps with lifestyle too,including leaving my very stressful job.

Thank you for your reply

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Hi Wilsond :-) as I understand it AF is a 'risk factor ' for various cardiovascular diseases and that includes strokes and dementia and medication including anticoagulants can reduce the risk as can a change of lifestyle (and the latter is applicable to everyone not just those with AF). So maintaining a good weight/eating a healthy diet/keeping the mind and body active should help to keep dementia at bay :-)

I think worrying about the things that may happen to us is not a good thing to do and can actually contribute to health problems. Better not to look at negative things over which we have no control but concentrate on things we can do something about :-)

I would love to go to Tai Chi classes but there are none locally. I hope you enjoy it.

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Tai chi was very good,instructor said for us to look on youtube so we can practice at home,perhaps if i find a good one i could out in on here

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Thank you doodie68, you are right,I am 'attacking' those things I can modify already as part of my response to AF.Yesterday's conversation with that person caught me on can bad morning...normally quite sensible and positive. You are right!

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My understanding, and this is a very non medical person writing here, is that AF can cause very small blood clots to form (because blood is being pumped slightly irregularly round the body because the heart sometimes misses a beat - AF) which can sometime lodge in the brian and this can lead to vascular dementia. Which is why people are usually advised to take an anti coagulant as this minimises the risk of both strokes and vascular dementia. (It causes the blood to flow more freeley and therefore blood clots less likely to occur).

So I guess the short answer is maybe the statistic is in the right diirection but it more realisticly probably refers to undiagnosed and untreated AF. pjr

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That does make sense,thank you .

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Hi there the statistics sounds scary but my mam is 81 dad 93 they are both a fib and no dementia. All we can do is mind ourselves healthy diet and some exercise.

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Thank you Carig,got my sensible head back on today....my own mum had AF,sadly died of stroke at 77 but no dementia,also gran same things but no dementia.They ate healthily,socialised,took their meds,although neith4r were anticoagulated (dont know why!!)

keep well

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I researched this issue last year...

healthunlocked.com/afassoci...

I now try to keep my oxygen levels up as much as possible, during an AF episode. I'm learning to practice better breathing techniques rather than the habitual shallow breathing. I also aim not exert myself during AF, I've also lost weight and will continue to do so until I reach an optimum weight, and I'm walking every day to increase overall fitness.

I also meditate daily and visualise my body literally radiating good health and vitality! I'm hopeful that these measures will help reduce the potential for AF to impair my cognitive ability :o)

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Thank you for the link Wendywu20,I will have a look!

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Hi wilsond

This is a link to the Alzheimer's Society website and predicting the likelihood of developing dementia. My takeaway was that taking anticoagulants with AF reduced the risk of AF causing dementia to pretty small compared to the various other risks which are likely to be combined anyway.

So, stay medically fit as you can, make the necessary lifestyle changes, avoid pollution from combustion engines and wood burners, and challenge your brain regularly. Then you too can audition for Senior's Mastermind 90+ category when the time comes. Like my aged rels, crisp into their late eighties and early nineties, both with AF, only one on AC, and neither with any hint of dementia.

alzheimers.org.uk/download/...

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Hi oyster! Thanks for the post made me smile..maybe Senior Mastermind one day! Oh no,having a woodburner fitted today...yes really..mu!tifuel thingy.

Oh dear!

Thank you for the above link

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wilsond

It's not your woodburner is the problem, it's your neighbour's, if his smoke blows in your house! Modern woodburners are safer too, and no probs if you don't open the doors too often. Lot of stuff on this in state regs for Oregon, USA. And we have fitted three this year. It's blowback on the open fires that gives us problems in our house. So you can enjoy your new burner 🙂

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Ah! Thank you!😀😀

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I think the AF and dementia link is well established. Other risk factors for dementia I know about are high cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, and obesity initial low IQ (obviously don't apply to anybody on this forum!) All of these (except the last) can be solved with determination.

Ablation probably reduces the ongoing risk of the small blood clots (microemboli) however the procedure itself is know to have a high risk of producing microemboli at the time. The data I have seen have failed to show that anticoagulants reduce the risk of microemboli, but I have not really searched for evidence. It would be very helpful if anybody could point us towards any published results.

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interesting that ablation procedure might cause dementia, already thinking from what I have read that ablation is not as simple as it sounds =:0 Just going under anesthesia is adding to dementia risks :(

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Yes, but I think of it like the stroke issue. You take a higher risk short term, but there is probably a much bigger long term gain.

Ablation is not at all simple, but then neither is the car you drive, but you still use it to your advantage!

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