AF Association
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Blood thinner post ablation

This is a question for people who have had an ablation and have had no AF symptoms since. My question is how long your EP kept you on a blood thinner after the ablation.

Thanks,

David

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It all depends on your chadsvasc score......many with one and above choose to take it rather then run the risk of having a very dibilitating stroke and many EP's seem to support that view.

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My EP had me on anticoaguants for life in spite of a successful ablation in 2005, and also in spite of a CHADS score of 0. I hit 65 a couple of years back so now it's 1, but (in my case at least) he doesn't seem to take much notice of the score! You'd have to ask him why.

Koll

PS Anticoagulants don't thin your blood.

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There is no evidence that ablation removes stroke risk so if you needed anticoagulation before then continue afterwards for life. . If the only reason you were taking it was for the ablation period then it is optional.

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I am on AC for life even though in nsr after ablation in 2013. Am over 65 with suspected tia so happy to stay on apixaban (well happy not quite the correct term but you know what I mean!).

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It is the CHADS2 Vasc score that determines your need for anticoagulation, not the amount of AFib. It is thought that the atrial stiffness or other factors, which may have contributed to the AFib, and not the arrhythmia itself may be the cause of the strokes.

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My EP takes no notice of CHADS score. His opinion is if you have or have had AF then you are on anti coagulants for life. It's like wearing a seat belt. Most often there's no need but you never know when the need will arise.

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I’m 43, female, I had a full PVI ablation 6 and half weeks ago. I was put on Pradaxa twice daily after the ablation for two months, have been told I can stop them in 2 weeks! No afib but elevated heart rate in 90s ever since ablation. Looking forward to that slowing over time.

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I had my ablation 3 years ago, a 2nd brain injury 4 years ago, before that, 2 TIAs and ever since the brain injury been on Pradaxa 110 mg twice daily. If I fall over and hit my head causing any form of concussion/unconsciousness I have a CT scan. All this on top of the heart disease. No trouble really, except for the rattling and the abattoir effect when shaving. Take care. Dave

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Thanks for all the replies. After my first check in (a month after ablation), my EP said I would stay on AC for 6 months to a year. So I am a little surprised to see so many say it is a lifetime prescription. I have also met with a hematologist (I had a DVT - unrelated to AF a year ago) who plans to take me off of AC as soon as my EP says it is OK. (and then monitor my blood frequently to see if there are any clotting tendencies) Her feeling is that the risk of either stroke from AF or PE from DVT has to be weighed against the risk of being on Xarelto. I should have a plan of action in about 45 days. I'll let people know what they say.

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My EP insisted I stay on Xarelto -- maximum dose (20 mg/day) -- for 3 months after my ablation, even though the procedure appears successful so far (4 weeks now and no A Fib), and I've never had to take anticoagulants before. The Xarelto was a prescribed few months pre-ablation only because of my paroxysmal A. Fib. I have always been leary re: Xarelto (look it up; scary). Then last week I had an episode of diverticulitis that resulted in massive lower GI bleeding, was rushed to the ER and hospitalized for a couple of days until stable. Yes, I've had diverticulitis before (I have chronic diverticulosis, usually well managed by diet and exercise) and sometimes there are traces of blood with that, but the high dose of Xarelto was obviously the cause of the uncontrolled bleed out, requiring hospitalization. Needles to say, I've stopped taking that stuff, and will have a long talk with my EP about it. MDs apparently don't know everything and specialists often don't take the time to study the complete medical histories of their patients. Hope this experience will be helpful to others. It pays to do your own homework and to openly question (in a reasonable way) the decisions your MD makes about your body.

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