AF Association
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Alivecor

It seems that this is apopular device. I am debating whether or not to buy one. Could you please let me know the benefits of owning one and how often you use it? Thanks for reading.

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Me too - same question. I'm dithering over it as I don't get regular episodes, but often feel vaguely unwell and not sure what's going on. Also travelling next week and just climbing stairs can sometimes make my numbers shoot from 65 to 100, so like DukesMam - do we make the investment? Wisdom welcome :)

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Hi Jakisu. I'm glad there's someone else with the same quandry as myself. I hope the people's informative replies have helped you. I am still sitting on the fence, but it's nice to have some input from users of the device.

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Agree. Might go for it 🙃

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If you are unable to get a diagnosis due to never being in AF at the doctors then this is a good idea. My own view is that if you know you have AF and are being treated then there is a danger of becoming fixated about your condition and constantly checking yourself which is not helpful. Use it as a tool but not a toy if you get one and don;t fall into the OCD trap..

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I have to admit I was using mine every hour when I first got mine but once it had achieved what I got it for - demonstrated AF, long pauses and other stuff as well apparently and got me a prompt appointment with an EP - I hardly ever use it, it comes out sometimes if I feel rubbish or have funny thumps and bumps. My cardiologist was very excited when he saw my printouts, saved him a lot of trouble with holter monitors etc I guess, and I was thrilled when he promptly lowered my dose of medication.

The main purpose of getting one should be to be to enable you to demonstrate rare events or get info about weird feelings. I guess it can also pick up patterns if you record every time you have AF or a very slow or fast HR.

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I bought one because my AF episodes occurred only once in 5 months during monitoring and then only for a few minutes. In those months I had 30 or 35 episodes that I was aware of, lasting up to 3 hours each but the cardiologist couldn't see them. Fed up to the back teeth with faffing about, I took my printouts and got referred to see an EP privately - got treatment, no episodes of AF since.

Like any other gadget, it is useful when used sensibly - I now use it to record anything out of the ordinary to show my EP or GP.

Money very well spent in my case.

(BTW I use mine with an iPad.)

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I have one and it works well, showed my EP my recordings last week and he said it was normal :-) . What I use it for is to record any event if and when I have one, so that I can show the medical professional because whenever I go to see a doctor, I'm fine....gggrrrr!!!

Very easy to use with my iPhone. Doesn't need to be connected as some people think, just needs to be near your device on which the software is running.

Koll

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I too have one. Got it after ablation and only use it now if I feel something unusual. My EP is always interested to see print outs and complains I don't use it enough!!

I had ablation two years ago. I have had a couple of very short episodes of AF in that time (lasted minutes) and caught it on the machine and could show it to EP. He does not recommend 2nd ablation at this time but I can keep an eye on things myself and give him the evidence.

I would recommend it

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Another question, Can you record more than one person's details.

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Yes but I could never get the guest function to work - I just record my husband's trace as mine and put a comment in the notes that it is his trace.

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Thanks Jo - I found the question by scrolling (eventually) - doh.

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Hi happy no, yes I too think it a brilliant tool but tell me how do you get a print out, I do mine with my phone, thanks Sann

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Thanks, only there nothing on the phone to say how you print it Sann

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I have an Omron, but it is the same sort of thing. I only use it when I have AF, and usually I take two readings - one to start off, one later when I feel better. Usually I get 'Irregular heart rate' to start with and 'normal' the second time, which is very pleasing. Occasionally it is not 'normal' second time, but better than it was before and I have to take a third.

I can view the 30 second displays and see what the rhythm looks like and it also tells me the beats per minute.

I can save the details and (thanks to software that cost an arm and a leg) can print out the details to give to any doctor.

I would not be without it. I find it very reassuring and if anything funny is going on it is plainly visible. It can save the need to go to the surgery or A & E to get an ECG done because although it's not sophisticated, it does give me a good idea of what the heart is doing, which is usually no more than just being a bit silly at about 90bpm. I like to see the sort of random regularity that I get in AF. Before the ablation last year I used to get much faster and more erratic AF than I get now.

It is also handy to check out my other half. It is easy to tell the details that are his as he always gets much weirder rhythm than I do.

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I'm pro the Alivecor.

You can use for peace of mind and reassurance, or to catch evasive arrhythmias.

Either way it's very useful.

Pat

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Thanks everyone for taking the time to reply to my question.

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Thanx All, really good to hear your experiences. I get that it's not great to be ocd, but also really helpful to put your mind at ease that it is or isn't actually happening. If I go for it I shall take the wisdom on board. Thanks again 👍🏻

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I am very pro AliveCor.

When, the morning after my ablation, I told my consultant he said great because he could see events and act on them without or in advance of seeing me - and this happened on more than one occasion. It also means I can self monitor which saves trips to the GPs.

Another advantage is that if you are actually in AF (if paroxysmal) or in persistent AF it is an accurate means to measure heartbeat (aka pulse) as wrist and finger monitors are inaccurate and only one (as at a year ago) cuff monitor was approved by NICE for use when in AF.

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Was able to catch AF and share results with doctor instead of trying to catch it with holter monitor, which never happened ! I don't need to use it now except to record episodes for on going treatment. Worth the expense.

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Ladies and Gentlemen, as some of you may know I am "biased" toward the AliveCor device since I invented it 😊 . That being in the open I can legitimately say that it is recommended by top EP doctors on both sides of the pond. Please feel free to ask additional questions and I will try to answer them. I must say "thank you" to the wonderful advocates here who have found value in our little device.

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Well done DrDave, you deserve a medal. Great device.

Koll :-)

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DrDave01,

  At one time alivecor had a service where you could pay something like

$10 and have a professional interpret the ECG.

Is that still available?

  Currently the app does "beat fluctuation".

I would like to use that feature.

Is there any chance it will be depracated?

  The alivecor web site only shows phones that have been tested.

But those phones are several years old.

I assume it will work with newer models of those phone.

How about the nexus 5X (google fi)?

thanks

gordon

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Yes, the over-read is still available. Bfx was an experiment and we are investigating its utility now from the data we collected. Please email our customer service for information on compatible phones. Thank you

David Albert, MD

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