Advanced Prostate Cancer
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new guy

Hi I am new here. I am 61. I was diagnosed this past July with stage 4 Prostate cancer. I have 3 bone metasis and 1 lymph nope. I am in my 5th month of treatment and had a follow up and treatment at the end of december. I take 1000 mg of Zytiga every day and 5mg prednisone twice a day. I also have an implant in my belly, forget what it was called and they gave me a shot for my bones, i also take 2 calcium/vitamin b tablets each day. Hate the side effects! I really have not noticed any pain. I am worried about what to expect in the next couple years, what will my quality of life be like? will I be one of the 30% or so they say will make 5 years. I have more hormones that a girls softball team! LOL, but it makes me so emotional sometimes.

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oldestnewest

Take some vitamin K with Advanced K2 Complex which directs the calcium tablets to your bones.

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thanks for the input!

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Welcome, Google vitamin K with Advanced K2 Complex (MK7 is longer lasting than MK4 in studies of bone health). The problem with prostate cancer drugs is that they mess around with bone health. Now I'm not a doctor, just what I have studied.

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Micheal,

Welcome to the group.The implant in the belly is called zolodex, the bone shot is xgeva likely, if not zometa, Your quality of life will be fine , enjoy every day, and do not worry, If you are worried about death, you can not live anymore. Many of us have lived much longer than those outdated survival statistics, Myself I am approaching 12 years after a dx of Gleason 10 bpsa of 148 with widespread metastatic disease to bone in distant sites , I have no pain and am not on pain meds. Life can be very good on therapy, Often we reach a level understanding of the things that really matter in life that was not possible before. Be sure to get your exercise, and eat right to combat weight gainfrom adt , and as Nameless said protect the bones. Learn all you can. The therapy you are on (zytiga)in combo with ADT (Androgen deprivation therapy) was not available when I was diagnosed, and has shown much better survival to add the zytiga early in adt .I wish you the best, please keep us posted on everything. There are many things to do to mitigate any side effects you may have. We are all here for you!

Dan

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thank you so much, this has been an emotional roller coast for me and my family...

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Brother ! Listen to Dan 59, Follow his thoughts.. great !

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“ If you’re worried about dieing ..you can’t live” Fantastic...Such fine advice.. Sage!

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Hi, my name is Lynn and my husband like yourself was diagnosed ten years ago at stage four prostrate cancer,PSA 483.00 at that time huge tumor in left arm. Has a metal plate and screws from his shoulder to his elbow, just happy they could save his arm. Had several radiation treatments at that time. Never went to a dr. And walked around for a few months in that pain in his arm. After the operation on his arm, put on casodex, and hormone needle every three months. Did great for ten years. Cancer came back this past year, chemo and radiation, michaelk501 you are going to be here for decades. There is so much they can do today. Oh, my husband has many bone mets, they radiated them too. Sorry, you Are going through this, but know we are all here for you and here to support you!!! You will be here for a very long time!!!! I'm sort of new here to and it's helped a lot to here that we are not alone, we share information and the support has helped me to know there are others in the same situation and that care. Keep us posted... Hang in there, keep up the fight you and all of us can beat this ugly decease. Sincerely, Lynn Pa.

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Dan and Ronnie

You are super stars! Congrats!

Bob

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thankyou! love this site!

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your so welcome!! I love this site too!!! Wonderful people and wonderful support!!! Love nameless9999's post!!! Great advice!!!

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Very beautiful Lynn.. we’re praying for you and Hubble..

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Thank you, LuLu700 I needed that!! I'm not very good at expressing how my heart feels, but I try and I really love all the hope and support that everyone here has given me. I pray for all of you too!!!!

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Better to let it out, then to keep it all inside of us .This is good. Thank you! Hang in there baby! As they say,remember that poster of a kitten hanging by a nail on the end of a rope..well that is us ... sleep well and have faith. We are all going to go through the same Forrest.Take time to smell the flowers once you get a chance . The prayers and compassion are helpful. They are heading your way..

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The fact that you are new is a great help to those of us who have been around a while longer. Your present day reminds us of how we were when dxd and this kick in the memories gives us more chance of helping newbies. I am 7 years into my new life.40 bone tumours gone, all pelvic girdle lymphs eaten by PCa before DX. Gone from PSA 200 at start to O.05 last week. Am encouraged by our brothers and sisters on this site who may have travelled a longer more perilous journey than me. I am happy, the sun has just come out, everyone smile and love your family and friends just that little bit more. Love to all, David - nearly 72.

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None more perilous then thou.I think we are all the same. Thanks for your amazing story...

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michaelk501 - Now that your feeling better about yourself, time to get to work so you can hang out for a decade or so. Eat right, exercise, read your rear off about this BS cancer and remember that if you want it bad enough, you will hang around for quite awhile. Forget the 30% chance for 5 years, that stat is older than a Stutz Bearcat. Now get moving and plan out a 6 day a week exercise routine. That's right, up and and moving. starting tomorrow.

Of course what do i know?

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You know it all Sir! That stutz bearcat was a bad ass just like you .. Thanks for the inspiration to others. High marks for that.

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I'm not a sir. I'm an enlisted man. Now quit wasting time typing, (like me :) ) and give me 20.

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Yes Sir!

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This is great. I love it! We have our own Drill Sargent. Great responses Nameless!!!! 😃

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I've been on ADT for a little over 4 years. The drug you get in your belly is doing the basic form of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to lower your testosterone to low enough levels to effectively stifle/kill a whole bunch of your prostate cancer cells, wherever they may be in your body. The Zytiga is a newer drug, taken with prednisone for protective purposes, that goes after even more testosterone in your body in a different way. You are getting a combination treatment that was not available when I was first diagnosed, based on more recent Clinical Trial results. That's Good.

Now that you are on "Hormone" therapy, ...

Here's one helpful broad overview of these "Hormone" modes of treatment for prostate cancer:

cancer.gov/types/prostate/p...

It mentions the probable drug you get in your belly:

cancer.gov/Common/PopUps/po...

And also the Zytiga: (Abiraterone acetate)

cancer.gov/Common/PopUps/po...

Not everyone gets all potential side effects, and many men get few side effects, or find that the side effects they do get are "manageable", in various ways.

In my personal experience, my libido or sexual feelings dropped off within the first couple of months. Within the first year it took me a while to adjust the comings and goings of hot flashes, and they were pretty annoying sometimes, and often interrupted my sleep, but got to be something to which I adjusted. (You can also get a lot of empathetic and humorous mileage out of them in Cancer Support Group Meetings with breast cancer patients and post menopausal women.) Loose clothing in summer, and a small fan in my room at night were ways to help them pass more quickly, while flapping the bed covers off and shortly later back on again. I also gained about 30 pounds, and it's more difficult to keep the pounds off than it used to be. In the last year I've managed to lose about 10 pounds.

Over a few years, the very low testosterone had the effect of trying to revert some of my adult male secondary sexual characteristics to a state closer to my pre-teens. Very slowly, I had less underarm and groin area hair, and chest hair, and hair on the backs of my hands, knuckles and toes. My skin's oil secreting cells did some kind of change that changed my body odor to a more neutral smell, rather than my usual endearing "old billy goat" fragrance after a few days without a good shower.

And, yes, on ADT, my testicles got a bit smaller. And for a year or so I could still stimulate to erection and a mild, somewhat comparable orgasm, but there were no ejaculatory liquids involved, and, with loss of libido, it got to where I didn't care about it any more. (This aspect of things is unique to everyone's sexual life, and whatever partner he may have. My older spouse had already gone through menopause years early, and we had long since transitioned to more modes of "outercourse" vs. intercourse, and more subtle and frequent forms of love and affection.) Nocturnal erections became far and few between, and without frequent erections and "usage", my penis when erect reduced to about 3/5 of its former length.

The daily emotions I had were certainly pretty strong, particular during the first year after diagnosis. For me, I think it was more the impact of the new reality of my "incurable" stage IV diagnosis, rather than the ADT side effects. I started attending various Support Groups (often with my spouse), and that really helped in "getting it all out", along with on-line support like this.

My other longer term side effect on ADT, and a subsequent treatment, has been a slow decline in peak energy levels, and how much I can do until I get a feeling of fatigue. In the first year at age 65 I was pretty much the same. In the second year, I ran out of gas at the end of a 6 mile hike at 7,500 ft. altitude on a visit to Yellowstone National Park. By the third year, I was still doing my lawns and walking a couple of miles around the neighborhood almost every day. By my 4th year, with some added Xtandi (an androgen receptor blocker), I have more of a background level of fatigue, and don't walk so far or so fast, and have to pace myself at age 69. (All through it, though, I've found that getting some intentional exercise despite any low energy levels is better than not getting any at all.)

I am grateful to be alive and to have been essentially pain free for all this time, despite my original diagnosis of very metastatic prostate cancer to numerous bones and lymph nodes. I expect to be on some form(s) of ADT "for life", along with other treatments.

Everyone is different. "Your mileage may vary."

Charles

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You’re cool Ctarleton! Good for you, you’re virtually pain free. Me too ,thank god. Thanks for sharing your story . I like what you have to say. I’m 1 yr behind you in ADT , so we shall see.. It s MLK day and his “ dream “ really hasn’t come true yet. Is that a reason not to dream? I don’t think so .. Without hopes and dreams , what do we have. ? Mundane existence as Samuel Clemens put it” most of us live life’s of quiet desperation ..That sure could apply to,a life lived with our friend APC .Im told “ no visible signs” by the docs. Can I say “ I’m cured” I’m cancer free” no way man .. none of us will say that .Im happy to be alive.. That’s enough for me...

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thank you!

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I ran out of gas on a shorter hike, at a lower altitude, at Yellowstone ... and that was before I was diagnosed and got my ADT shot in my belly. It was eligard by the way.

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Michaelk501, with modern treatments you can be around for more then 5 yrs. We all have the same fears and most have the same side effects. Some do better with symptoms then others. Don’t pay much attention to that 5yr stat. With some luck you’ll do much better then that. I’m playin centerfield on that soft ball team.I cry anytime I see suffering or brutality. . I’m on my 3rd yr , I was as you were, Same stage , mets but I went into kidney failure due to,PC tumors blocking urethra . 2lymph nodes lit up. . Now no visible signs for almost 2yrs .. after RT & still on Adt but I did orchiectomy 9/16 .. In the last two months I.ve started to feel more cheerful I had anger and fear and suffered some crazy moods, and at times I thought “I M not worthy to walk this earth. That was last summer.. Hope you can stay upbeat and positive unlike I was . Maybe just maybe they can make breakthroughs in science. Until,then we just “Cope” and do the best to enjoy the simple stuff in life. Love and compassion must replace macho and ego. We are all humbled and shown our mortality ,.. That said , there s much that you can do to live and enjoy what you can while living with APC ..We know there’s no cure for #4 metastatic APC . But there is also no cure for diabetes ,heart disease, no cures but lyfstyles can effect our outcomes. For me it has been a complete life change and time to put every facet of my life in order.. Make the best of it..I believe you will adjust somewhat to the side effects with time as I have. I’m not saying that I’m normal in any way ,rather stating that we (can) adjust... there’s no choice .. we’re in this for the long haul. However long that is? Nobody knows.. Any technical or medical question that you could have I believe will find an answer here. These ladies and gentlemen have been through it. Good job finding this cite.. It helps me daily. Talking to someone who is or has been exactly where you are at now is valuable to us. God bless and good luck....

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Great post, Lulu. It really captures some of the mental and emotional aspects of our shared experiences that we live with on a daily basis.

Charles

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Thanks ! Keep the faith!

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Hi, me again, like you my husband went into kidney failure after almost ten years years his cancer came back with a vengeance, this past year.tumor grew up from the prostrate and blocked his kidneys tubes. He was operated on and had the nerostomry (spell) bags for five months, after chemo and six weeks of radiation , it shrunk the tumor and he was able to urinate on his own and they were able to remove the tubes. Two questions, did you have the bags and also did you have the lymph nodes operated on?? My husband is going in this coming Friday the 19th to have one lymph node taken out. They can't do it with the needle, he'll have to,have a small incision and stay in the hospital a couple nights. I slept many nights in the hospital sleeping in a lazy boy recliner.i can relate to all you said in your post, while cancer is so unique for each person, it seems by what you said that you and my husband had suffered some of the same things, sorry about all the long posts, I'm a bag of nerves.

Take care I'm praying for you too!!

Sincerely, Lynn

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Wow this is heavy duty! Yes I had the bags for over 6 ms as they shrunk pc tumors in urethra with Lupron and RT..Also I had stents put in near 6ms in addition to tubes then weened off it all..Thank god!I pulled out my left tube twice and rushed to cath lab l for em surgery. Second question My two lymph nodes that lit up originally also vanished from view I pray that your husband will get these same good results. Thank god that we both survived kidney failure. I won’t lie. It all took a toll on me. Still in need of rebuilding my strength and balance. We are all off balance hormonally. And we know it That’s part of the battle. Keeping sane and active and happy ...Sorry for the surgery but it s just another hurdle or battle In the fight we fight to stay alive. On the other side of surgery and a quick recovery , then you will start to heal and build back up. Going thru what your husband and I went through it’s a miracle that we survived. My drs told me that 50 yrs ago we would not have. I had 1 and a half yrs with constant severe UTI’s. Not good on the old immune system Safe surgery for him and you must sleep eat rest and take care of yourself as well. I’m sure after what he’s already survived that this blip will be hurdled over easier then the last few. Thank you for responding. You are doing well.

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Forgive Me if I’m rambling but you mentioned sleeping in the lazy boy by his side.It got me. Because as you my lady of two yrs was in that lazy boy by my side and we were neither wed or Knew my diagnosis .Two weeks later I asked her to

Marry and she said yes when the doc said I had only 50 months to live. Well, that’s as theysay “Bull****. I live for her love and because of her love as I’m sure is the case with you also. With you love and caring he’s going to be fine and you’ll experience slot of love and happiness to go along with the pain of APC and life’s other hurdles. Best wishes and our prayers go out to him for a raid recovery and a successful outcome.

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Sorry rapid recovery. Im not great at using this format .Please? Stay in touch.

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No need to be sorry, I'm not great at this either, but it means so much to me to have made new friends on this site that I really found by accident. It is very calming and helpful just to know tthat you are not the only one going through this and being able to try and give support and get support from people that really know what you are going through. My husband started this journey at age 65.He is now age 74 young.im 73. You and your wife will enjoy many, many happy years together.!! Thank you for all your support. I'll let you know next week how the lymph node thing turns out and what the biopsy results are. The surgeon says he's going after the big one???

Talk about rambling, I win the prize!! Lol!!!

Take care, best wishes !!

Sincerely, Lynn

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Thank you !

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michaelk501

To answer your questions:

In a couple of years you'll be playing on a girl's softball team.

Your quality of life will be dreaming about winning the leagues MVP award.

And In 5 years you'll be trying to tag some of the girls on the team.

10 years later you'll be dealing with all those paternity suits.

So shake it easy and live and laugh every day cause you'll be around for a long long time.

Good Luck and Good Health.

j-o-h-n Tuesday 01/16/2018 12:55 AM EST

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Despite your hormones being messed up, you must realise that life is a state of mind. I know it's hard to think like you once did but whatever you feel, don't feel hopeless & helpless. A positive thought well help you just as well as medication. Let thoughts of dying be back in their place and get on with it. I am up early for the start of my new chemo, I have been dx for over 8 years, it's hasn't all been a 'fairy tale' but I am still here. Chin up!

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Hi michael501

Welcome to the group.

I noticed you were newly diagnosed since July 2017 and you are on Zytiga & prednisone. You also stated it will extend your live by 5 years. So wish you all the best in your journey.

If Darryl said there are roughly 2600 Advanced Prostate members in this forum then I am 1/2600 that is going on a different path.

I credited my ability to overcome my solo journey in this group.

I have been reworded/repaid by my kind gesture awhile back when I withdrew $10000 from my pension fund and gave $4000 to the Council of Deaf & Blind.

In the 75 days since my confirmed Stage 4 D2 prostate cancer I have gathered enough information. I like to personally thanks Patrick. Kuanyin, AlanMeyer, Nalakrats and others who did contribute to my decision (agree or disagree)

By the way I am using baking soda/honey; Ural and Green tea.

I am pain/fatigue free so far. Only side effect is minor haematuria when I physical exerted myself.

At this stage I cannot ask for more and I am happy with my progress.

I didn't set out as deadly or scary when I was confirmed Stage 4 D2 and I thought worth tackling this beast in a systemic way.

Each and every day that I live past my 75 day journey I am more confident with my progress.

I hope you would donate $50 each month for the next 4 months to malecare and Deaf & Blind and had your ears and eyes open to this new reality.

This is not soliciting and should I offends you I apologise.

You can be pain free like me. I was also in worse shape than you.

This is my story. And thanks for being patience.

Roland

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Hi Roland, I was doing baking soda and black strap molasses. It was vial tasting. Could you please inform as to porportions for the honey and baking soda? Thank you. Jrb12 ( Richard)

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Hi Jrb12

Thanks for your support.

Some time back I thought I could be a pioneer. After some more digging lately I realised that I was stupid for so many people has been successful and they are still very much alive and kicking. They are definitely not suffering as much as those who opted for a little of life extension as laid out by those experts (oncologist)

I would like to know more about your condition.

Like what I have stated I am feeling great pain:fatigue free. I can even have the liberty to eat/feast quite freely.

I don't know anyone listening wants to swap places.

Sorry no offence intended and I am truly sorry if I have caused some bad feelings.

So again this is my story and thanks for being patience.

Roland

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Hu Richard

I learned that you are diagnosed Stage 4 initially PSA 590 was already on the normal course in conventional treatment.

I would appreciate the time line which you have not mentioned and how you incorporate the baking soda/molasses unless you thought you use it as it's going to help in your drugs side effects for relief.

Hope I have nail the assumption right on.

Wish you all the best.

Roland

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Hi from down under.

My history is similar to yours in that when I was 58 I a radical and 3 months later my PSA was 4.2. Now I am 71 and been on the long journey. PSA down and them up as various medications failed. They told me don't make any plans beyond 2 to 5 yrs too. That was the depressing bit. I lost it for a while. Mindfulness meditation help and so did positive self talk. As did reading Lance Armstrong's book: It is more than about the race (or something like that). I believe that in a years time the meds you are on will be stopped to put some zip back in your life and you may well be off them for 18 months before they are introduced again. ALthough there was a guy in our Support Group who spent 10 years on Zolodex and Cosadex and then told he was cured - he is well into his 80s now and still cancer free - although he is in a nursing home: dementia got him. Stereotactic radiation may be an option for you (google Calipso radiation). There are other radioactive treatments that are in the form of a series of monthly injections (radium 223) that is down the track for you. There is also Lutetium or something like that. And of course chemo, immunotherapy and genomic treatments in the pipeline of trials.

Best thing I did was join a gym and get into the cardio stuff - It has certainly helped me tolerated the side effects of Zolodex then chemo and more recently xtandi.

EXERCISE IS MEDICINE . And in so doing, it helps your mental health as you become very conscious that you are doing something to fight the Jack-the-dancer.

Some of the happy pills like eleva (which are designed to take the edge off anxiety) may reduce the severity of hot flushes.

There are no guarantees in life expectancy but for most Prostate Cancer is a chronic disease not a death sentence.

Every Best Wish Chalkie 42

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Hi Michael501, I dont remember all my Gleason scores, etc. ,only that my PSA was 590, and Mets every where. Confirmed stage 4. I had chemo, cassodex, prednisone, with lupron and xgeva. Recently startrd xtandi as my psa rose to 16 now down to .038. Anway, eat healtjy and exercise. When I was working I never missed a day. I now work part time. So for me keeping busy is key. Take your b6 and b12 to keep emotionsl balance, i know what your going thru. I am going to get the vitamim k that I read about here. This blog is great, the only thing I don't like about it, is thzt it reminds me everyday that I have this disease. I forget sometimes that I have this issue, lol. Also, I did find a wonderful support group, locally, my friend and protector, God. I now live in the Panhandle of FL. Being a Christian in this part of the country is fantastic and very much a daily part of life very openly. Opening my eyes has helped me tremendously. Anyway, bless us all here for what we are experiencing. March onward and enjoy every minute. Oh yes, laugh alot. It helps!

Richard

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Good Morning michaelk501,

Welcome to this site. Like you, I had numerous mets when diagnosed 5 1/2 years ago (please see bio for treatment history).

One thing you learn, is that everyone on this site, (and with prostate cancer) is different. We all started out different, we have had different treatments in various orders, we react to treatments differently, and our quality of care is not the same.

For patients like us, what matters are 3 things:

1. Assemble the best medical team that you can afford. To maximize your chances of living a long life, find a Medical Oncologist who specializes in prostate cancer.

2. Build your support group of family, friends, and other fighters with this disease. Share your journey.

3. Never Give In. As my best friend and fellow PCa fighter from Vietnam days says, "If we live long enough, we will be saved by the new treatments and technologies!" Make sure that you are present when immunotherapy comes of age.

Best wishes. Never Give In.

Mark, Atlanta

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nice, thanks!

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Hmmm Michael...we're almost "twins" in our timing...I'm JUST turning 61 on the 24th of this month...and I was diagnosed with Stage 4 with a few bone mets and a couple of local lymph nodes...all in pelvic area...back in May/June of last year(2017). I started Lupron right away and then in October(17) started Chemotherapy (Taxotere). I'm actually having my 6th chemo this Friday...which is scheduled as my last. I had the chemo every 3 weeks. You did not mention what the treatment you're on has done for your PSA. Mine has gone from 17 down to 2.4. However, after being on Lupron and also on the chemo for this long...I'm NOT thrilled that I have not gone down quickly to undetectable...but I'm happy (at least) that the numbers are heading the right direction. I will mark you to "follow"...and hope that we are lucky ones...as we're getting treatment done right after a lot of big and important trials have been completed. Good Luck ! ! ! ~~and keep a ceiling fan and a floor fan aimed at you while you sleep....~~John

p.s. I am currently trying to get a referral through my insurance company so that I can go to the Moffit Cancer Center at this point in my treatment to get a "second opinion"/reassurance that I am on the right path with my Oncologist at University of Miami (Sylvester Cancer)

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hi john, when I started treatment in august my psa was 176. I was 3.3 on december 28th. I am doing 3 more months of adt and see where I am at the end ofmarch. I feel lucky tolive in pittsburgh pa, I am being treated at hillman cancer center.

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I am Ajith, 63 diagnosed for pca two and a half years ago with psa 70 and Gleason 9 (5+4). Had spread to iliac lymph nodes, invaded seminal vesicles and rectal walls.At the time of diagnosis I was asymptamatic except dry ejaculation. I had undergone TURP as prostectomy. Immediately started ADT and radiation (IGRT) of 28 fractions after 3 months. After one year my bladder neck was completely blocked , maybe as a side effect of TURP or radiation. Bladder neck incision was done immediately for removing the blockage. One month later I lost my urine control completely . Since then I coping with this situation with diaper and penal clamp. ADT (leuprolide) was ok for about 20 months. Then psa started rising ( from 0.2 to 7 ) I went for psma pet Scan and it revealed there is metastases in para aortic lymph nodes. My residual prostatic gland and bones are metastases free . As the disease was only in one nodes my medical oncologist suggested radiation to the affected nodal strip. Zytiga (aberaterone) was also started simultaneously. Completed radiation two months ago. My latest psa is 2.3 . As side effect I have occasional rectal bleeding. I l I am doing well and leading an active life with all these problems. Nothing to worry, there are still a lot of treatment options

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5 years? NONSENSE. Plan for many more. I was dx over 3 years ago with stage 4 psa 209 with pelvic mets. I am now psa undetectable <0.02 and still on Firmagon (monthly shot in the gut) and Casodex. The 1st year is tough on the emotions. It gets easier after that. Feel good now getting ready for a 20 mile bicycle ride in a few minutes.

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Hi Michael501, I started in 2007 with 42 radiations (no metastases) then in 2011 my PSA went up to 72 and they found metastases. They gave me five years to live and I was grateful for that! Well I had 30 more radiations, and started Lupron (Eligard - generic) injections. So I am in my 7th year of ADT. I feel pretty good and I have a normal life of a retired 72 year old. My PSA has been 0.00 for all of this time. Now remember we all have different forms of PCa, different insurances, from different countries, different doctors, different ages, and we have other diseases as well. Yet we have in common our experiences and opinions. So listen to your doctors and get a second opinion if you want. My outlook on life is better than ever! I wish you and your family and wonderful future.

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hi everyone, when I started treatment in august my psa was 176. I was 3.3 on december 28th.after 4 months of treatments. I am doing 3 more months of adt and see where I am at the end of march. I feel lucky to live in pittsburgh pa, I am being treated at hillman cancer center. (upmc)

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Iam so glad found this site! Feeling better already, Thank you!

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It’s good for you. I found this after 2yrs of treatments. Wish I had found it earlier.

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So much positiveness on this site. I started my own business two months before my cancer returned after two years from having proton radiation. We went through, devastation, anger, fear, etc. As a Christian, I wasn’t necessarily angry with God, but I sure wasn’t a fan of His plan. Then one day after much prayer and consideration I realized I could do one of two things: give up on the business I started or grow my business. God told me move forward and so I did. Now I look at this chronic illness as a calling from God to do more. Two years later, my business is good, I have good people managing the day to day and my wife and I are applying to be foster parents. You can die while you are living or you can live and die like everyone else...when it’s time. I’m already in eternity, I’m just moving towards the next destination. When you feel sorry for yourself, go find someone or something that needs help and help them. I can get hit by a bus tomorrow. Why worry about this pain in the rear disease because all of us will meet the same fate. Eat sensibly, exercise, get a good medical Onc and find a cause greater than yourself to serve! Be blessed my friend.

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Great source of information about prostate cancer from a long term survivor and Us Too member.

theprostateadvocate.com/obs...

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