ADHD Parents Together
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ADHD help in a private school.

Does anyone have advice/experience working with privates schools and ADHD needs? My 7 year old attends private schooling, he has ADHD with inattentiveness, and I feel his teacher is unrealistic with expectations, and his needs. She actually has 2 special needs kids (one is autistic), and says my son needs Behavioral Therapy. We've spoken to his doctor and he said that of the many studies done, Behavioral Therapy has not been shown to really help kids with ADHD. Her child with Autism benefits a lot from it, but it's like comparing apples and oranges. Help!

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Hi Knights Prep in Kensington B Randburg, they are open to all kids, also have remedial classes called Bridging if needed, work with you and your child? Most open school still there and very very happy!! 0117896778 to visit tell them Nicole sent u. You can even ask for a few.parents names and numbers as references

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Hi LizHarrod, I also struggle with this problem, my daughter is 9 and she is on medication but the teacher just tells us that she needs to be more responsible and that's that. It sounds like this teacher is not understanding what exactly ADHD is. We asked our daughter's psychiatrist to write a letter of support with information about the disorder and what our daughter's needs are, then we had a meeting with the principal who will be meeting with the teacher but I think it is better to meet with both at the same time to come up with a plan for your 7 year old. The teacher can not argue with the doctor about what your child needs...

take care!

LettyB

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Thank you for the feedback! His doctor gave us a quick guideline of realistic abilities and expectations. He suggested I make an appt with a Behavioral Therapy doctor and have them also notate what he needs. My son is so bright, and does really well with school work....it's the turning in all assignments, completing everything, sitting still, paying attention (he loves to read and often will be reading a book instead of doing what he's supposed to), and not fidgeting that His teacher laments on.

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Awesome! That was the only way to get them to listen to us!

Hoping for the best!!!

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Private schools do not have to do mandated IEPs or 504 plans. But with enough pushing on your part, letters from the doctor on what he needs from the school, meetings with teacher and principal you should be able to help your child succeed.

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Thank you!! We have 4 children, and he's my oldest...I really want to give his teacher a dose of reality, but know we may have our other kids in her class in future years. 😜

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Behavioural therapy is helpful for ADHD kids...mine lacks some social skills and at times can become very frustrated with others. The therapy teaches them techniques to apply to the school setting. I would listen to the teacher and give it a try.... ADHD kids need social and educational support. I do both for my boy and I can see some progress.

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Hi Liz!

I have a degree in psychology and took courses in applied behavioral analysis. I currently work as an instructional aide in my kids private school. I work with autistic, adhd, and cognitively delayed children. Behavioral therapy is used for kids with adhd. From my experience it usually works best with medication, but that is a personal choice each parent needs to make. Behavioral therapy can help kids learn better ways to deal with anger, focusing issues and impulsivity. We have had a few problems with teachers expecting all kids to fit into a cookie cutter mold. My best advice is to get your daughter an Iep or 504. Then make sure they are adhering to the most important parts and not punishing her for these things. Such as needing more time on tests, projects, etc and earning some free time. Most children not just adhd kids function better with a 10/3 schedule. Which isn’t always viable, but it is a good model. Work 10, then get a few minutes of free time. My son is 10 and was diagnosed 3 years ago. I make sure he is able to go to our resource room for tests and gets to earn rewards for meeting his goals. (iPad time, helping teacher, etc.) They still dwell on everything he’s not doing, but I can see the strides he’s making. Sometimes you just have to ignore some of that outside noise and give yourself and your daughter a break. I know it can be hard, but it’s the best advice I could give. We see a counselor in and out of school and we have a really great Psychiatrist my son has seen for the past 3 years. He does behavioral therapy and takes concerta and intuniv. In our case I have seen a difference in his attitude and behavior, but again meds are a personal choice.

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