An intimate relationship between thyroid hormone and skin: regulation of gene expression

An intimate relationship between thyroid hormone and skin: regulation of gene expression

The evidence continues to accumulate of the huge impact of thyroid hormone on the body - this time on skin and hair.

I see an ever-increasing gulf between what the researchers are writing about and what people report from the medics they actually meet with.

Front. Endocrinol., 22 August 2013 | doi: 10.3389/fendo.2013.00104

An intimate relationship between thyroid hormone and skin: regulation of gene expression

Dario Antonini1, Annarita Sibilio2, Monica Dentice2 and Caterina Missero1,3*

1CEINGE Biotecnologie Avanzate, Napoli, Italy

2Department of Clinical Medicine Surgery, University of Naples Federico II, Napoli, Italy

3Fondazione IRCCS SDN, Napoli, Italy

Skin is the largest organ of the human body and plays a key role in protecting the individual from external insults. The barrier function of the skin is performed primarily by the epidermis, a self-renewing stratified squamous epithelium composed of cells that undergo a well-characterized and finely tuned process of terminal differentiation. By binding to their receptors thyroid hormones (TH) regulate epidermal cell proliferation, differentiation, and homeostasis. Thyroid dysfunction has multiple classical manifestations at skin level. Several TH-responsive genes, as well as genes critical for TH metabolism and action, are expressed at epidermal level. The role of TH in skin is still controversial, although it is generally recognized that TH signaling is central for skin physiology and homeostasis. Here we review the data on the epidermis and its function in relation to TH metabolism and regulation of gene expression. An understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of TH action in epidermal cells may lead to the identification of putative therapeutical targets for treatment of skin disorders.

frontiersin.org/Thyroid_End...

The link above will take you to the abstract - and on the right you can choose which full version you wish to view.

Rod

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  • Well, from personal experience, I can say that thyroid hormones are extremely important for healthy skin. My skin has improved beyond recognition (and I'm not exaggerating) since starting T3.

    I shall have a read of the full paper on Sunday. It is now past my bed-time and I'm going to Legoland tomorrow :D

    Thanks for posting this. More back-up for when I try to persuade my GP that I need T3!

    Carolyn x

  • Hi rod i totally agree, i had so many skin problems, vitiligo, rosacea, bacterial and fungal skin conditions and malignant melanomas, before i was diagnosed with my thyroid problem, no one even suggested that there could be a link.

    Linda

  • Helvella et al : I think you will see that the Post I have just made today Sunday 21 February '16, before seeing this Post made 2 years ago, may well be an ongoing research development.

    My vitiligo started last year or year before means I have no colour left on my arms now - my skin is as white as a sheet! It's been because of TUK and my own research I said a few months ago I had started on a natural daily liquid course to help sort my gut out - I'm not sure it has done all that but it certainly gave me more Energy.

    I have just looked at the pack of Vitamin D tabs I bought last year from a pharmacy, not my regular one and have just seen that it says - as of 1997 - that 75% of French in their homes are deficient in Vitamin D!

    I'm definitely now ignoring my Dr and Pharmacist who advised against supplementing it. I can't think why they would though!

    Also, given our hair follicles grown through the skin - what affects the dermis/epidermis must surely also affect our hair?

    What are two of the side effects of our Thyroids failing us - thinning hair and dry skin!

    What does Vitmin D do for us - according to my pack it.....

    ....participates in the resistance of organisms

    ....helps good function of our immune systems

    ....favours absorption of calcium which is good for our bones

    .....helps to maintain strong bones!

    That could all be a load of sales hogwash - but my Gut instinct tells me it's not :-)

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