Skin sensitivity and rls: As time has... - Restless Legs Syn...

Restless Legs Syndrome
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Skin sensitivity and rls

FluteE
FluteE
37 Replies

As time has gone on, I’ve started noticing sensitivity to things touching my skin...ie. shoes on my feet, pants touching the backs of my knees and now two of my toes touching one another🤪😡 Now I’m feeling like a bug is crawling on me and as soon as I look for it, nothing is there! Does this have anything to do with RLS?

37 Replies
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Madlegs1

Neuropathy or MS?????

Doesn't sound like rls.

Good luck.

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Manerva

Hi, it doesn't sound like RLS at all. Nor does it sound like a neuropathy, since that's usually a loss of sensation, not an increased sensitivity.

It may be that you've become allergic to something.

Are there any colour changes in your skin anywhere, your fingernails or the whites of your eyes?

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FluteE
FluteE
in reply to Manerva

No changes in fingernails or eyes. This hasn’t always happened... maybe in the last year and gradually getting more noticeable.

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Manerva
Manerva
in reply to FluteE

Probably not a hypersensitivity of a genetic origin then.

If you don't get pain, tingling, pins & needles, burning or numbness, then probably not neuropathy.

If it's related to your RLS, I'd expect some kind of connection, e.g. if the sensitivity is more pronounced just before the onset of RLS symptoms or occurs at a particular time of day or such.

Other than possibly an allergy, I can't immediately think of anything else.

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Parminter

Flute, what exactly does 'as time goes on' mean? Did you ever experience anything like this as a child?

The genetics of RLS is similar to the genetics of other conditions, including ADD and PTSD, in which hypersensitivity to both physical and emotional stimuli is present.

All conditions share a thinning of the somatosensory cortex, which renders us prone to this sort of heightened response.

I cannot stand loud noises, labels in my clothing, tight shoes, polyester, the smells of household cleaners, industrial fumes etc. etc. - much more so than usual.

Has anyone ever said to you 'Don't be so sensitive' ? - and you have no idea why?

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Manerva
Manerva
in reply to Parminter

You're quite right, if this is something that's happened since childhood it's fairly typical of Autistic Spectrum Disorder, specifically Apergers.

I've had the same sensitivities as you as long as I recall. However, in this case, there would be other features of ASD which would be noticeable.

If FluteE's only just now finding it a concern then it sounds recent and hence unlikely to be ASD or ADD

It is interesting though there are Dopamine dysfunctions associated with ADHD/ADD and ASD.

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Parminter
Parminter
in reply to Manerva

And in the case of ADD there can also be problems with iron.

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Manerva
Manerva
in reply to Parminter

Two common factors then!

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Parminter
Parminter
in reply to Manerva

I would imagine there are many. If RLS alone is already associated with at least 19 gene loci, there is bound to be crossover.

With neuroscience currently taking front and centre stage, I think we will learn a lot more, and cease putting conditions into airtight boxes with airtight solutions - it never made any sense.

Unfortunately, most allopathic medicine will be stuck in that particular box for some time.

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Manerva
Manerva
in reply to Parminter

I recall you may have said it yourself, there's a lot on money invested in allopathic medicine.

It appears that the world is NOT ruled by varied secret societies suggested by conspiracy theory, but by economics.

So much money, private and governmental, invested in carbon producing processes that it seems that future human generations are basically f****d.

By the time that the students climate striking in the past week get to any point where they can effectively influence anything, or forget their ideals anyway, it will be too late.

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Parminter
Parminter
in reply to Manerva

I fear you are correct, Manerva, in every point, and it makes me really sad.

Nevertheless, Greta Forever! She will not lose the way.

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Manerva
Manerva
in reply to Parminter

I hope not, but it is shocking what abuse she has been getting.

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Parminter
Parminter
in reply to Manerva

She is female, and young, and the Rich Old White Guys don't like it. Nothing will change until they are all gone.

May they be granted a special tsunami.

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FluteE
FluteE
in reply to Parminter

I have not always been this way.... within the year. Just thinking maybe it could be RLS getting worse.

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Parminter
Parminter
in reply to FluteE

Flute, are you getting enough magnesium? Vitamin D? Could your diet be poor?

If the answer to everyones' suggestions is no, then you should see your doctor. Any odd change needs attention.

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FluteE
FluteE
in reply to Parminter

I will let my dr know to check that when I go back in the next month.

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Eryl

I wouldn't be surprised at all whether it has the same cause, i.e. something is attacking the nerves. Which nerves are most sensitive to the attack is down to your genetics. The thing attacking your nerves is highly likely to be in the food that you're eating. It is possible that you have heavy metal poisoning or a virus, but those reasons are less likely.

The most common food ingredient that attacks nerves is sugar, and as it has no nutritional value, you can safely cut it out of your diet without detriment. This means cutting out sweets and chocolate, cakes and biscuits, fruit juices, and the syrups used in processed food. Other things which could be attacking nerves is high consumption of gluten or dairy products, or in rare cases, sensitivity to nightshades (aubergines, tomatoes, chillies etc).

In some cases it may be an artificial food additive that is attacking nerves. Sorbate preservatives have a reputation for this.

The best way to identify a particular food is to keep a diary of food eaten and symptoms. In many cases the symptoms occur about half an hour after ingestion of a substantial ammount, but they can occur late in the day after multiple small doses.

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Manerva
Manerva
in reply to Eryl

Hi Eryl, I appreciate you mean well and I suspect RLS severity may be related to food intolerances in some people, but I am compelled to point out some of the inaccuracies in what you say. This is one of the features of Aspergers!

Firstly, there appears to be definite evidence in relation to ADHD, ASD and idiopathic RLS that there is an underlying genetic element. Specific genes have been identified!

To say that RLS (and specifically idiopathic RLS) is due to substances attacking nerves is misleading.

Secondly to say sugar isn't necessary in a diet is also a little misleading. I would agree that "processed sugar" doesn't need to be added, but Carbohydrates, one form of which is processed sugar, are a vital and necessary part of our diet. Glucose (sugar) is the main substance used by all body cells to generate energy. If there is insufficient carbohydrate in a diet then the body has to get energy from fat or protein.

From this to say RLS is due to "sugar" attacking nerves seems to be nonsense.

There are many carbohydrates and many forms of "sugar" in foods, glucose, dextrose, lactose, sucrose etc. So, on this sense, what you say about "sugar" is simply vague.

I have no idea if there is any evidence of any relationship between any kind of sugar or carbohydrate and RLS. I suppose it's possible that people with dairy intolerance may be affected by lactose, the sugar in milk.

It may be that it's not the "sugar" that intrinsically involved with RLS, (if it is at all), but an excessive amount

However, idiopathic RLS remains a genetic disorder and if the type or amount of sugar taken in the diet is a factor, then it may be a trigger only, not a "cause". The implication that eliminating "sugar" from the diet is somehow a cure for RLS is inaccurate.

I do agree that processed sugar food additives aren't recommended, one of the reasons being that they attack teeth! So I'm not suggesting that it's OK to eat lots of "sugar" but I doubt for most RLS sufferers, eliminating it will have little benefit.

Your experience may be that your RLS is related to what and when you eat. I was diagnosed with idiopathic RLS. My experience is that whatever and whenever I eat bears no relationship to my RLS symptoms whatsoever.

In order to support your claim, you'd have to demonstrate that a lot of people have the same experience as you.

This is an academic exercise since we haven't established anyway, that FluteE's skin sensitivity is due to RLS. It doesn't sound as if it is.

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Sky7777
Sky7777
in reply to Manerva

What are “bears”?

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Lapsedrunner

“bears no relationship “ !! 😂

1 like
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Sky7777

😂. Sorry, had just woken up.

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Eryl
Eryl
in reply to Manerva

Cells can run on glucose, but the body can produce it itself from carbohydrate and protein. They can also run on ketones, made from fat. Many athletes eat a ketogenic diet, and they are recommended for diabetics. I am not the only one who finds that avoiding sugar and refined carbs reduces RLS.

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Manerva
Manerva
in reply to Eryl

Sorry, more inaccuracies,

1) cells DO use glucose and oxygen to generate energy, it's not a matter of choice.

2) "sugars" ARE carbohydrates, not something separate.

3). Cells can use fatty acids to generate energy.

4) cells can use proteins as a source of energy, but first it has to be broken down into glucose - sugar. Easier to use carbohydrates.

5) In the absence of insufficient carbohydrate in the diet or an inability for cells to absorb glucose, e.g. diabetes then there is a build up of ketone bodies.

These are essentially poisonous and in sufficient quantity can cause death To say cells "run" on ketones is wildly inaccurate depending of course on what you mean by "run".

6) Using protein for energy is a desperate measure. If prolonged it leads to muscle wasting, hormone deficiencies, reduced immunity, breathing difficulties, generalised oedema and potential heart failure.

7) I imagine athletes want build up muscle not get rid of it. I see a ketogenic diet can help lose weight if anyone is considerably obese because they have lots of stored fat.

3) just because a low carbohydrate diet works for you and a few of your mates does not support the view that it's a general cure for RLS. This is not how credible evidence is generated.

Refer me to. repeated double blind placebo controlled trials with hundreds of subjects that conclude that sugar causes RLS and I might be more persuaded.

In the meantime, being told by implication that someone can possibly cure their RLS by cutting out "sugar", alone, is at best misleading and could cause unnecessary suffering by delaying effective treatment.

As none of this helps FluteE identify the cause of skin sensitivity, let this be an end to it.

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Eryl
Eryl
in reply to Manerva

'they' are not my mates. 'the' are people who have responded in this forum, and I haven't meticulously made a note of their names. You're starting to sound like a climate change denier now.

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FluteE
FluteE
in reply to Eryl

So what do you do for heavy metal poisoning? I’ve had to cut out nightsides completely due to interstitial cystitis.

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Eryl
Eryl
in reply to FluteE

Go and see a medic.

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Sampsie

Hi FluteE,

That sounds miserable. I've had the crawling sensations before, when I've been standing or walking more than usual. You look down and the bug you're expecting isn't there. And odd pin pricks of pain anywhere as if someone stabbed you with a pin.

I don't know what causes it. Perhaps it is neuropathy as that can manifest as pain, prickling, burning or other sensations. I do know any nerve pain worsens in me with trigger foods. Inflammation I assume.

Sorry not to be able to help but I hope it improves.

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FluteE
FluteE
in reply to Sampsie

Makes ya feel like you’re going crazy:/

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Manerva

Hi Sampsie.

I share your experience, "buzzing" sensations, dull pain, burning, prickly, sudden stabbing pains etc. All neuropathic.

"Sensitivity" to anything "touching" the skin is probably different.

I have both neuropathy and touch sensitivity and experience them differently. Difficult to describe, but the emotional impact is different.

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LoisTonya

Yes, .i experience this, particularly my nightie and my own hand on my leg in bed

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FluteE
FluteE
in reply to LoisTonya

It’s enough to drive a person insane!

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lsd245

FluteE - I am with you in this type of sensitivity to clothing you describe. I've had pretty severe RLS for at least 10 years (am in my mid-70's) although rather well controlled now with iron treatments and a very moderate dose of ropinirole. But, somewhere about 18 months ago, I began to be bothered later in the evening by sensitivity to clothing around my legs, particularly trousers, ie, ladies slacks. If I was out somewhere, I had to put up with it or go home and disrobe. I live alone, so if I were home, I would remove the slacks and maybe put on a very soft pair of PJ's, which helped, or a pair of shorts. This seems to be worse if I am tired. My diet is good, and I'm sure the problem is not triggered that way. So far I am managing it on my own but thinking of discussing it with my doctor. Good luck to you.

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Manerva
Manerva
in reply to lsd245

You may find this useful

healthline.com/health/allod...

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FluteE
FluteE
in reply to Manerva

Thanks I’ll check it out.

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marsha2306

Reply to ALL, Fyi, I eat pasta, fruit and ice cream all the time and none of those make my RLS worse. I also drink a glass of wine every night. So, my point is, sugar cannot be generalized as causing or making RLS worse.

I also think the idea of heavy metal poisoning is way, way out there!!!

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Mirapexhell

I dont know but I'm having that also. Been on mirapex approx. 9 years maybe it's doing something to the nerves?

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Manerva

You may find this interesting!

healthline.com/health/allod...

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