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Prostate Cancer Network
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PSA spiked

Hi, I am new at HealthUnlocked. PSA 29.4 and after biopsy (10 samples - 4 at 30% and 6 at 50%) confirmed cancerous with Gleason score 4+5=9 on May 2015. No sign of metastasis to the bones after complete CT scan of bones. Urologist stage the PCa at 2a (localised). Then he suggested prostectomy and removal of lymph nodes. I did extensive research and in one of the papers that mentioned if your specialist talk about removing your unaffected lymph nodes, you should just 'run'. That's what I did.

After that I decided to go the route of alternative natural supplements and complete diet and lifestyle change program. For 3 years my PSA remained at 23 - 33. Did PSA monitoring every 3 months. Six months ago my PSA started to spike. In May 2018 the PSA was 53.3 and October 22, 2018 it went to 96.4

My family doctor, with experience of PCa patients mentioned that usually PCa would experience bone pain IF there is metastasis. To date I have not had any pain on my whole body. Any Comments, Folks?

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This is very sad. You listened to the idiots on various internet sites instead of sound medical advice. If you had been treated with surgery or radiation then, you might have been cured. Now, the best you can hope for is to manage the disease.

Find yourself a good medical oncologist. He will order a bone scan/CT to check for distant metastases. Bone pain only occurs later in progression (your family doctor has no idea). Your medical oncologist will put you on hormonal therapy and either Zytiga with prednisone or docetaxel, depending on the results of the bone scan.

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Thanks for your comments. Much appreciated.

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They can't assess your nodes for cancer without removing them (generally). My only concern was whether it could cause edema of my leg(s). I knew that edema can occur after radical mastectomy. My surgeon said it would not.

It's 6 weeks since my RP/pelvic node dissection, and wouldn't you know it, he was right!

My dad neglected his prostate cancer. When he finally got treated, his bone scan lit up like a Christmas tree. He never reported any bone pain.

It is likely Tall Allen is right that you now have advanced disease. But all is not lost; my dad lived many years after his diagnosis (with lung cancer as well) and died of something else. Get yourself into treatment now.

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Yes I agreed with Tall_Allen's comments. At 71 years old and without experiencing any bone pain, I thought I am okay, until I joined this site. The information is valuable. I am going back to the professionals to find out my options. Sad to admit there's not much good news upcoming. Thanks to you too for your info.

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Get to a Doctor.

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I am very sorry to hear of your latest diagnosis. I must say that I am unaware of any nutritional or diet supplements that can cure prostate cancer. I know that hindsight is 20-20, but your story is yet another example of the importance of serious research into the disease and treatments for it. Changing your diet can seem like an "easy way out," when looking at life-changing surgery and/or radiation--and potentially chemotherapy. I think if you had stuck to legitimate science-based medical research, you wouldn't have taken a chance on diet therapy. I hope you seriously follow the advice of a legitimate practicing physician specializing in prostate cancer. Best of luck to you.

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Thanks Jeff85705. Looking back on the information referred to me about a colon cancer patient who went for surgery and then refused chemo to treat met, he went on diet and supplement therapy. Claimed he cured himself since 2004. He then started to write about his treatment program called 'Square One' . But his was colon cancer with met. Totally different from my prostate cancer. My mistake ! Looking forward to discuss treatment options with my urologist. Thanks for your info.

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You can't accept a treatment based on one (or even more) anecdotal report. For one thing, you probably don't have the full story. It's best to keep to reliable websites from well-know and respected sources like Mayo Clinic and other established sources. Curiously, I would like to know if that person treated for colon cancer with mets is still alive and/or still "cured."

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I think he is still alive and well. He is the one promoting the "Square One" cancer treatment program.

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If you go for a scan make sure you have plenty of iodine - organic sea kelp is a good source - in fact sea kelp is a good diet supplement everyday - I hope your prostate cancer hasn't spread hopefully your alternative diet and supplements have kept it contained your prostate if it has get your prostae removed

Meanwhile take inositol

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Thanks! I heard of the potential radiation from the scans and lots of iodine is needed.

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Yes the thing is the radiation they use on you is radioactive iodine now if you are deficient in iodine your body will absorb this harmful radiation because the body can't tell the difference between bad and good iodine - but if you are replete with good iodine your body will not absorb the bad iodine ? So it's important - organic sea kelp is a good choice or lugols iodine

Inositol is very important to stop cancer spreading it is harmless no side effects check it out

Wishing you well

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Hi Lillyof the valley37. Ok does that mean the x-rays of my pelvic bones 5 days before my last PSA test could have spiked my PSA from 60 to 96.4 ?

I played basketball with some kids on October 14th, and I believed I sprained my pelvic muscle. When I visited my doctor on Oct 16th, he sent me for x-rays (3 positions). Then on Oct 22nd it was my regular (every 3 months) PSA blood sampling test. Thanks for your info.

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I don't think an xray would impact on your psa like that ?

In UK radioactive iodine is injected when they scan your bones so it is best to take good iodine before so that your body doesn't absorb the radioactive iodine

as I said before the body can't tell the difference between good and bad iodine that's why people working at nuclear plants are given good iodine

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Thanks.

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Didn't your urologist at least lecture you on the aggressive and dangerous nature of your gleason 9 diagnosis? I don't get that you could leave it untreated.

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Thank you folks for the comments and valuable information. I realised what Jeff85705 said about being unaware of nutritional or diet supplements curing prostate cancer. All the information I have refers to other cancers. Nothing specifically on prostate cancer. And in fact most of those cancer patients who claimed to have been cured have either gone through the surgery/radiation/chemo and added the nutrition/diet to 'stay cured'. Tons of websites out there that are misleading. I want all you folks to know I appreciate your comments. Thank you so much.

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I just wrote a response, but it echoes Tall_Allen's answer almost perfectly:

. . . Bone scan, and oncologist.

. charles

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Thanks. Respose much appreciated.

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Your comment: After that I decided to go the route of alternative natural supplements and complete diet and lifestyle change program. I agree. Research these first.

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I've been using Kratom to help manage my symptoms of pain and fatigue associated with my battle against Prostate Cancer.

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Wow. If I may be blunt, you seem either very brave or very foolish. From your first post, it would seem you have a high risk prostate cancer diagnosis, not a situation where active survielance would be appropriate, regardless of supplements or diet change. Please consult an oncologist or two and reconsider. Several teaching college programs (like Duke or Vanderbuilt in my area) have programs where you meet with several specialists to review your condition.

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I was not fully aware of the seriousness, even though my urologist casually said "you have aggressive prostate cancer. Let's go for a FULL CT Scan for any signs of metastasis. And the CT Scan came back totally negative (no metastasis). Urologist said the cancer tumo r was localized. And the rest of my case was mentioned earlier. Now I am living with it one day at a time. And of course getting professional help, trying. Your comments much appreciated.

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Good news on the CT scan. Still a problem that needs to be addressed. All the best of luck as you decide the next steps.

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I think I saw in your comments that you plan to discuss with your urologist now what to do. See an oncologist specializing in prostate cancer instead.

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Thanks for the advice. Will do.

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