Mobility Scooters: I am seriously considering buying a... - NRAS

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Mobility Scooters

Rachmaninov2 profile image
28 Replies

I am seriously considering buying a mobility scooter, if you have one how did you get on with it.

28 Replies
sylvi profile image
sylvi

My best advice to you about getting a scooter is always buy a four wheeled one as they are more stable. Also try before you buy take a test drive at the shop before you buy. xxxxx

Rachmaninov2 profile image
Rachmaninov2 in reply to sylvi

Thank you for your reply Sylvi, I appreciate your advice. 🙂

Poshcards profile image
Poshcards in reply to sylvi

I beg to differ on that, I have a 3 wheeler for 13 years now and never had problems, in fact they turn on a sixpence, 4 wheelers don't x

dippyd09 profile image
dippyd09 in reply to Poshcards

I went to a mobility shop intending to get a folding scooter but instead bought a four wheeled chair which turns so easily with absolutely no effort. It’s the best scooter I tried.

cyberbarn profile image
cyberbarn

My son doesn't have a mobility scooter, he went for a wheelchair, but I found the mobility shop was amazing at helping us choose the right one. Better to pay a bit more for something that is really useful and helpful, than buying the cheapest off the internet that doesn't suit so you can't use it well.

Rachmaninov2 profile image
Rachmaninov2 in reply to cyberbarn

I have done some research and the choice is overwhelming. Many thanks for your good advice cyberbarn.

Gnarli profile image
Gnarli

Yes, I have bought one a while ago when the fatigue was at its worst. I bought a four wheeled one that you can take apart so that it goes in the car boot. On reflection I should have got an automatic folding one as taking it apart and putting it together is a proper pain in the pinnie.

Rachmaninov2 profile image
Rachmaninov2 in reply to Gnarli

Thank you for sharing your experience Gnarli. In an ideal world it would be helpful to be able to afford two, one sturdy four wheeler and a lightweight folding one. But cost prohibits.

Waffs profile image
Waffs

I purchased a boot scooter from the internet after doing loads of research and visiting specialist shops. I paid about £750 for my scooter and I am so pleased that I bit the bullet and went ahead with it. My scooter splits apart into five pieces and easily goes into my small car boot. If you do get one make sure the wheels are a decent size as they do make a difference and get one with suspension. Mine has seat suspension which works very well. Good luck.

Rachmaninov2 profile image
Rachmaninov2 in reply to Waffs

Thank you for your detailed reply and good wishes Waffs. I can imagine the difference the scooter made to your quality of life.

Lolabridge profile image
Lolabridge

Have you thought of hiring one or two first to see which suits you best? There's a Shopmobility Centre in my town where mobility scooters and wheelchairs can be hired for the day/week at low cost.

I was given one and have found it really useful for going shopping in the town and just getting out and about locally. Mine will also come apart to go in the boot of my car but my manual dexterity is not brilliant now and the battery is really heavy to lift, so I haven't taken it in the car yet.

Rachmaninov2 profile image
Rachmaninov2 in reply to Lolabridge

Good advice thank you, do they give you any training before letting you loose? I feel a bit apprehensive about how well I will cope the first time.

Lolabridge profile image
Lolabridge in reply to Rachmaninov2

It's pretty straightforward - can't have taken more than a couple of minutes for the ones I borrowed. Perhaps some are more complicated though.

zen4 profile image
zen4

I have a fantastic scooter from TGI the minimo plus.It folds up really easily but you do need to be strong to put it in the boot. My husband does it!Also an estate car makes it much easier whichever scooter you have. Its 30kg including the battery so fairly light. It can go over fairly rough ground as well and is very stable and has 4 wheels. It has a small lithium battery so we took it on the plane to Australia recently. It slows down when you turn to go down a kerb and speeds up when you turn back onto the kerb Very clever! It had a knob to adjust speed as required. I also paid extra to customise my seat just for me! I also made mine left handed at no extra charge!The rep was very helpful and came to the house for me to try it out. You need to decide what is important for you really. Portability, travelling, going on uneven ground etc and of course the cost. Mine was £2000 Also the comfort of the controls vary as does the way you hold the controls. You must definitely try before you buy

Check the distance it goes on the full battery charge and then take 2 miles off. It uses more uphill and if you are heavier and if the ground is rough. The very light ones are only suitable for inside and on very even surfaces eg shopping malls and are less stable. It depends where your lifestyle really. I love mine and it has given me the chance to go many more places. It is heaps and heaps better than a wheelchair unless you are self propelling and get a lightweight chair or an electric wheelchair but those are very heavy and not really portable.

You can also increase your walking if you go out on it with someone else who can sit on and have a rest while you just walk a bit!

Rachmaninov2 profile image
Rachmaninov2 in reply to zen4

Thank you for your comprehensive reply zen4, I like the sound of the slowing down feature. At £2,000 the one you have would seem to be at the higher end of the price range, but like anything you get what you pay for.

zen4 profile image
zen4 in reply to Rachmaninov2

Yes Thats true The battery does lift out with mine and its very light so it can be charged inside which is useful. Just do lots of research, ask lots of questions and try the scooter a out. Disability centres sometimes have an Occupational therapist who can help you if you need help and advice to choose

Rachmaninov2 profile image
Rachmaninov2 in reply to zen4

I think having an Occupational therapist at a Disability Centre is a great idea, I’ll find out if my local Centre has one. Much appreciate that information zen. 🙂

farm123 profile image
farm123

Try lots and think about where you would use it most. I started with one of the larger take apart ones (Roma Sorrento) as I was looking at more than just pavements. Upgraded to a larger one (Kymco maxi XLS) with suspension and larger seat which is more comfortable although did put solid tyres on as kept getting punctures 'walking' the dog BUT I changed my car for a small WAV (wheelchair accessible vehicle) so I could be independent as the folding/take apart ones still take a lot to put in a vehicle (some parts are still heavy or awkward to handle) and it is quicker and easier for me to 'drive' it in. Look at the different types of controls and placement of levers if hands are an issue. Also think about storage and where you can charge batteries - some come off the vehicle (but can be heavy) and others need charging in situ on the vehicle.

Rachmaninov2 profile image
Rachmaninov2 in reply to farm123

Thank you for your helpful reply farm. Yes hands are an issue, and I’m thinking about where I will keep it sheltered. There really is a lot to take into account. I have needed one for some time so am really looking forward to finally getting one, it will make such a difference to my life. 🙂

Poshcards profile image
Poshcards

I have been using one for 13 years now, legs have gone on me, my main advice is to find some where that does an assessment and takes you on a road/pavement and obstacle course like you would if out on one. They assessed that I needed a 3 wheeled one as my knees had bad arthritis. It the best thing since sliced bread, you cant go on beaches or rough ground sadly but it does give you 'freedom'. A true assessment will also steer you in right direction as different scooters take different weights of people! Hope this helps xx

Monkeysmum profile image
Monkeysmum in reply to Poshcards

Hi Poshcards. Hope you don’t mind me asking, but what is the advantage of three wheeled scooters over four wheeled, for those of us with painful knees? Xx

Poshcards profile image
Poshcards in reply to Monkeysmum

With 3 wheels there isn't the two wheels and arches in frontstopping you from stretching legs out. My foot bed extends up either side of wheel, which is centered, so my legs sit either side of wheeI its like a gentle sloping ramp. Mind you they are harder to find these days. Go to a good mobility dealer and discuss xx

Monkeysmum profile image
Monkeysmum in reply to Poshcards

Thanks Poshcards, that makes a lot of sense, as my knees kick off if I have to keep them bent at 90 degrees for too long, so I can imagine having the space to stretch them out would make a big difference.

Rachmaninov2 profile image
Rachmaninov2 in reply to Poshcards

Many thanks for your response Poshcards. Same here, problems with my legs. I will definitely try to find somewhere that carries out assessments and gives you a trial run.

I’m glad yours has helped you regain your sense of freedom, that’s what I am really looking forward to. My world has become quite small since the leg problems began.

Yes, it helps a lot! 🙂

Leics profile image
Leics

I brought one from eBay about 8 years ago. Mine is a four wheeler and very stable. The only negative is there is no suspension so I can’t go for ‘miles’ on it. Mine was cheap but works brilliantly although I did buy new batteries for it. If I was to buy another I would still go for a four wheeler as I don’t drive. My hubby can take it apart and put it in the boot of the car so it’s portable if you have someone strong to lift it, the batteries are the heaviest bit I think and the back wheels with the roll bar on it. It’s been so good for me as it enables me to get out to the shops if I need to.

Rachmaninov2 profile image
Rachmaninov2 in reply to Leics

Thank you for your reply Leics. You make a good point about getting one with suspension, I think I will put that on my list of requirements as I have spinal stenosis.

Yours has obviously made a difference to your level of independence, it’s good to hear.

Leics profile image
Leics in reply to Rachmaninov2

Yeah I don’t use it too much but I’m very glad to have it. I don’t get out much during the day as my husbands works full time but when I can if the weather is good or if I have to go to the docs etc it gets me there in about 5 minutes whereas trying to walk there would take me well over half an hour and boy would I suffer for it. It’s really helped me to feel a little more independent and even if I just go out for some fresh air once in a while I’m able to do so now.

Rachmaninov2 profile image
Rachmaninov2 in reply to Leics

The same here, would be so handy for getting to doctors appointments, shopping and as you say just to get out of the house for some fresh air.

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