NRAS
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Hypothyroidism often seen in RA

Hypothyroidism, often subclinical is common in RA and can make RA symptoms worse. On this forum there has been a lot of discussion on diets and their role in decreasing RA symptoms. Less often however discussion on why and how they effect the dysfunctional situation. When it comes to supporting normal thyroid function with diet, there is in fact many things you need to be aware of and can in fact do. Here is a link that in my view has a lot of useful information.

litalee.com/shopexd.asp?id=213

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Thanks for that, but like everything else to do with diet it's a mine field. I keep taking the Thyroxin.

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Thank you stberhard, for your reply. The knowledge of what foods in fact affect thyroid function has in fact proof in biochemistry. In other words for example knowing what foods to keep a way from has shown to help with low thyroid function, in fact even made thyroid supplement unnecessary. Since subclinical hypothyroidism is so very common in RA and often turns into clinical hypothyroidism, since it in fact increases RA symptoms it seems like a good idea to take this in to account in your diet (?) You do not need a diagnoses, which is unfortunately hard to get, to support your body with diet.

Low metabolic rate ( low pulse, low temp, high cholesterol) is often a quite dependable way to assess slow thyroid function and easy to see if diet makes a difference. I did this assessment and used a diet to support better thyroid function. Now my MR is up, cell energy production increased and I'm seeing a thyroid, adrenal specialist in a couple of weeks. Very interested to see what my bloods say and if in fact a thyroid supplementation still needed. Wishing you all the best. Simba

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Hi, I'm in no way doubting that what we eat affects many functions of our bodies and I'd be interested in the outcome of your efforts. I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism in 1989 and RA in 2009. Keep in touch.

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Will do😊

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I'm on thyroxine

Diagnosis 21 years ago first in my family. Now there are 4 of us with it. I have 9 siblings.

Have limited family history can't go beyond my parents who died when my parents were young. My dad was 10 my mum was 20. My maternal grand mother died when my mum was 16.

I think the autoimmune comes from my mum's side as she too has thyroid diagnosis in her late 70s she is now 95.

I'm the same only one with RA seropositve. Although other siblings have similar problem as me which mainly affects my upper limbs.

This would be interesting to see the connection.

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Seems like all the AI diseases are under the same umbrella, it's how they are manifested, where the difference is seen. Many scientists are of the opinion that AI is always a systemic disease where cells in the body all communicate with each other. How our AI disease shows it self has to do with presumably a lot of other factors. Genetics seem to be a factor, ability to handle stress and so on. Yes it is interesting. Thank you for your input.xxSimba

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Interestingly the World Health Organisation has found that much of the world is now Iodine deficient. The Doctor who prescribes my husbands LDN, has been involved with dietary research for over 20yrs. He is now recommending people take 2 drops of Lugols iodine daily. This wouldn't apply to people already taking Thyroxine. He says this is a safe dose.

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Some interesting aspects on iodine deficiency.

functionalps.com/blog/2011/...

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I've had this some 30 years called Hashimoto's do not stop Levothyroxine ! you will die in about 6 weeks. I nearly died way back then as my then GP did not test me for it. It was a visit to A&E then when a doctor said you've not well very pale and so stopping with us until we get some tests done.

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