Suddenly nervous! Long-term quitters, help please!

Ok, this is really silly. I just suddenly woke up feeling like I can't do this. I'm five months and a few days smoke-free, and from having a really secure state of mind about life without smoking, out of the blue I'm thinking it won't last. What's that all about, oh wise long-term quitters? Is it normal?

Hoping it's just a blip. I've no current desire to smoke, no cravings have crossed my mind for ages.But it seems like being a non-smoker is too good to be true :(

7 Replies

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  • Oh Incy, maybe it's the fear we all have, and it surfaces at different times.

    The fear is all this struggle is for the nothing because we believe that in a moment of madness as some unspecified date in the future, we'll stick a cigarette in our mouths....and we'll feel like we've come home

    That's my fear anyway

    Incy, you're doing so well. Don't think about tomorrow or even this afternoon.

    The only time you have is now...and you're a NON SMOKER.

    Take care and have a good day xx

  • And....I think its great you're posting here and helping everyone. It's good to remind yourself how far you've come.

    You are in control. You will only smoke again if you choose to.

    So don't worry x

  • I have had a 3 year quit. And a 70 day quit ( that's was recorded here)

    The end of those quits were deliberate acts by me. I wasn't hijacked by a sudden overwhelming desire to smoke.

    Self sabotage.

    That is not going to happen to you

    X

  • You're very wise, I think, Elizabeth! I like 'the only time...is now' :)

    You've cheered me up, thanks! xx Wishing you a good day, too.

  • Relax, its perfectly normal.

    The addiction is an insidious thing, you have psychologically relied on smoking as a crutch and a safety net for a very long time. When you start a quit there is some excitement, novelty and a challenge. Each day is a new page in this chapter of your life and each significant milestone opens a new chapter. Eventually you get to the point where you settle into your quit and it just becomes the new normal, however when that happens you are losing the challenge of the quit which was the focus which helped you keep the self doubt at bay.

    So now you have a slight weakness for the addiction within your subconscious brain to try and chip away at you, for me the best way to deal with that was to simply ignore them, remind myself that I don't want to go back to the slavery of smoking. The doubt stems from the realisation that you have changed and that you are never again going to be that person who had the ciggie in your hand but that you have great memories of those times and you have attributed part of that experience to smoking, the truth is though that if you hadn't had the ciggie in hand you would still have had great times so they are false doubts. If you remind yourself that the doubts are simply a nostalgic feeling and have no part of the new you then they pass without too much trouble, however if you dwell on them and allow them to fester they will be trickier.

    As time goes on the number of days which are bad goes down, and the number of days which are great goes up. Its all part of the quitting process, hang in there you are doing fab.

    Cheers

    Nic

  • Thanks Nic, that's really helpful :) You're so right, the challenge has faded hugely and so I'm perhaps not quite so focussed, and also not celebrating my success so much any more.

    I've been out for a run and that's helped, too - reminded me of some of the benefits of quitting and the reasons behind my quit.

    I love this forum! xxx

  • Its just a temporary hitch incy. I have had simliar days on previous quit attempts.

    You will have bad days like this, just power through them and tomorrow / soon you will be fine again.

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