Felt proud!

Had routine medication review with my GP yesterday. Felt good when I was able to tell him that I have been smoke free for almost 6 months. It is actually 161 days (or £1127). Hadn't seen him for about 9 months so he didn't know I was attempting a quit. When I look back, it doesn't seem more than 5 mins since I suddenly decided that the last two cigs in my pack were my final ones. Still some things I struggle with - not least the lack of 'reward' of a cigarette after completing a task before moving on to another, so still finding motivation to do things quite difficult. Perhaps I shouldn't mention the little belly I have developed (!)

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  • Well done, chickweed! It's such a relief not to have that gut wrenching guilt when you go to the doctors, 6 months is starting to sound properly quit.

    I can relate to smoking being a reward, in fact I think of it as being punctuation (I'll have a cigarette and then I'll. ... or I'll ..... and then I'll have a cigarette!). Unfortunately, I can relate to the belly situation too :0

    Keep going Chickweed, you clever thing, you :)

  • Yes ... 'Punctuation' is definitely the word!

  • £1127 wow! its amazing how quickly it all adds up :)

  • Belly??? Nearly a stone heavier after 5 months smoking cessation.........Do I care? No No No is the simple answer.............My rather large Belly is so much better than my 15 a day 38 year addiction to Roll Ups.

    Hey Chickweed I do hope your Doctor was proud of you. 6 months is amazing :)

  • Woohoo go you! That must have felt great :)

    Bellies? The smallest of prices to pay for our freedom! x

  • Well done, I know just what you mean about the 'rewards'. I am really struggling to get through the housework as I don't have any motivation at all. I realise now how much I relied on my fags to get me though things, "I'll just finish hoovering downstairs and then I'll have a fag" etc.,etc.. I've put weight on as well, so you're not alone. I hope your doctor congratulated you? After 40 years you would have thought that mine would have at least said 'well done' wouldn't you?

  • Doctor's are a funny breed, they harp on you to quit but when you do not much is said because it's just common sense after all not to smoke. On the flip side, raise your hand if you know a doctor that smokes......my arm is straight up in the air.

  • Hi Chickweed...nearly 6 months, thats sooo gr8.....That " reward" thing you are talking about is probably created and caused by the fact that when you used to smoke, the nicotine locked onto receptors that click open the release of a neurotransmitter called Dopamine, and Dopamine is not only our pleasure pathway but also our reward driver...Its the basics of human survival, gave us the motivation to hunt, seek the prize , eat and feel the pleasure of the reward........when we stop smoking we have it switched off a bit and need to revamp the dopamine system in other ways , but our brain keeps attatchments as it knows a ciggy will reward with pleasure feelings, via dopamine release......

    The best way to satisfy your brain is to find other ways of rewarding it, the feeling of success, pleasure gratitude etc, will all trigger dopamine release and you will feel reward without a ciggy and eventually the connection in your brain will break.....

    Most of us start subconsciously replacing our dopamine trigger with yummy food (chocolate for me lol..)but almost anything you enjoy will do it.....some people can even flick on their dopamine switch mentally and get the pleasure and reward feeling through meditation or thought...(im gonna try to master that one)

    you can take herbal suppliments , saffron based to help the dopamine flow and elevate your motivation, drive and energy witch in turn drives pleasure and reward....(i take nurobalance, but it seems to be pharmacist only in Aus and NZ)..??? dont think you can get in uk,

    Exerccise is a gr8 one because the endorphine release is part of the dopamine pathway aswell so you feel gr8 from many aspects ...u can turn boring housework tasks into active missions, achieve your set goal, trigger your dopamine..it sounds silly i know but its true neuroscience and it can help you improve your motivation etc after stopping smoking.....

    all the best and well done..:)

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