Two more days!

Wow, 2 days to go and I'll start week 4!

There have been good days and some bad days, but I'm still standing in "clean" air. I did take a chance this week and went to a club, where I knew there would be smokers. The actual time spent there went well, ended up at a table with other ex-smokers, so it made that easy. BUT, after a couple of beverages, the trip home, and into the next day - man did I pay, but did NOT cave. The psychological war fare began, coming in waves. But, I am still standing in week 3!

My son, also now an ex-smoker said he's proud of what I've done so far, but cautioned I need to make it to the 1 month. Is it some "magical" point?

Just wanted to check in before heading off to work today. Reading others posts here have contributed to me sticking with it.....

Hope everyone has a great weekend! :):)

4 Replies

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  • My son, also now an ex-smoker said he's proud of what I've done so far, but cautioned I need to make it to the 1 month. Is it some "magical" point?

    I think we make the magical points for ourselves. ie 0ne week, 10 days, one month etc. Every one sets targets. It gives you a time to focus on and when you get there you can give yourself a big pat on the back. Sounds as if you Son has set your target. Just think how proud of you he will be when you get to one month. Then three months. You just can not let him down and I'm sure you wont.

    You are very lucky to have the support of him. I have similar with my Daughter, although she still smokes. Not everyone is so lucky

    Well done on getting this far. As I'm sure you have heard before, its gets better and easier as time goes on.

  • Hi D2D,

    I'm assuming you're asking if there is a magical point at which we feel comfortable enough in our quit to not worry about going back to smoking again? If that is the case, then the answer is "it depends". :D

    For most people, cravings wear of fairly quickly (within days or weeks). Nostalgia can unfortunately last for a long time, and perhaps even a lifetime. It is important to differentiate the craving and nostalgia, because craving causes anxiety whereas nostalgia is more of a (false) romantic association with smoking.

    In order to get over the worries, a lot of people have to go through "firsts", at places/events where they would normally smoke but don't. After each first, the second and subsequent time around become easier, until the situation becomes a non-issue.

    For almost everyone who wants to stay safely off smoking, the most common mantra is N.O.P.E. (not one puff ever). Too many people fall down due to that one cigarette.

    Alex.

  • Thanks!

    To both A's, thanks for the insight! I think his point might have been a bit of both.... LOL I know he's proud, perhaps from his quit he felt the first month was the hardest, not really sure. And/or maybe it was his was of encouraging me as well.

    I work at a job where I'm out in a car all day. I make lots of stops, kind of like a route. So, as far as to dealing with the "firsts" idea, I changed my route for now. I had smoking spots, potty break spots, and eating spots, etc., etc. I've mixed things up a bit to eliminate some triggers gone different directions, stopped in new places. I think that's helped.

    Over the last few days I've been gradually working back in some of my normal routine, route and stops back in as I know I can't avoid them forever. I figured I needed to break the psychological side as well as the physical dependent side. I think so far this has been working out well for me and helps keep me going.

    I'm excited already for Monday to come as I know I'll be starting my 4th week. A goal to meet and exceed. I'm realistic enough to know the battle is far from over in terms of the days, months, and years ahead in staying smoke free, but the plans still is just to keep it simple - day2day, my own motto here as well as my name! Thanks again for the wise advice and input, we all know every little bit helps. ;)

  • I figured I needed to break the psychological side as well as the physical dependent side.

    I couldn't agree more, and it's great that you recognized this up front. I think too many people neglect the psychology of quitting, and are thus not equipped to deal with their quit even after the physical craving has disappeared.

    Well done!

    Alex.

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