Early CKD Support

Confused

My blood test in December 17 showed gfr 65 and creatinine 83. In Jan 18 gfr 62 and creatinine 87. I paid privately for a kidney scan and the doctor said both my kidneys are a good size and look healthy. My bp us low to normal and I'm not diabetic. My gp says there is absolutely nothing to worry about and that I don't have kidney disease. She also said no special diet needed, just watch salt, sugar and red meat. My gfr 5 years ago was 87. I have been taking omeprozole for about 14 years but have read they can cause damage to kidneys so have weaned myself off and for the last month only take levothyroxine for underactive thyroid. I'm having another blood test end of March. Should I be concerned?

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Hi,

Absolutely no reason to be concerned. You are at Stage 2 of CKD. All I can tell you about that doctor is that she appears to be typical of many who for unexplained reasons think/believe that it's okay to tell you not to worry about your health until much later down the road.

I've included an article for you about the Stages of CKD. It's from the davita.com website and will provide you with a lot of information to handle this stage and the ones ahead of you. More after you read the article.

Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease

About chronic kidney disease (CKD)

With chronic kidney disease, the kidneys don’t usually fail all at once. Instead, kidney disease often progresses slowly over a period of years. This is good news because if CKD is caught early, medicines and lifestyle changes may help slow its progress and keep you feeling your best for as long as possible.

Five stages of chronic kidney disease

To help improve the quality of care for people with kidney disease, the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) created a guideline to help doctors identify each level of kidney disease. The NKF divided kidney disease into five stages. When the doctor knows what stage of kidney disease a person as they can provide the best care, as each stage calls for different tests and treatments.

Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR)

Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is the best measure of kidney function. The GFR is the number used to figure out a person’s stage of kidney disease. A math formula using the person’s age, race, gender and their serum creatinine is used to calculate a GFR. A doctor will order a blood test to measure the serum creatinine level. Creatinine is a waste product that comes from muscle activity. When kidneys are working well they remove creatinine from the blood. As kidney function slows, blood levels of creatinine rise.

Below shows the five stages of CKD and GFR for each stage:

Stage 1 with normal or high GFR (GFR > 90 mL/min)

Stage 2 Mild CKD (GFR = 60-89 mL/min)

Stage 3A Moderate CKD (GFR = 45-59 mL/min)

Stage 3B Moderate CKD (GFR = 30-44 mL/min)

Stage 4 Severe CKD (GFR = 15-29 mL/min)

Stage 5 End Stage CKD (GFR <15 mL/min)

Once you know the GFR you can determine a stage of kidney disease and read about that particular stage by clicking on a link below:

Stage 1 CKD

Stage 2 CKD

Stage 3A and 3B CKD

Stage 4 CKD

Stage 5 CKD

If you would like to see a doctor who specializes in the care of kidneys, called a nephrologist, you can use DaVita's Find a Kidney Doctor tool to locate a nephrologist in your area.

Related articles on davita.com

Definition, Causes, and Symptoms of Chronic Kidney Disease

Do You Have Symptoms of Chronic Kidney Disease?

New to Kidney Disease

More Articles in Stages Of Kidney Disease

What is an end-stage renal disease?

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is divided into five stages. The last stage is called end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and is the time when dialysis or transplant is needed to stay alive. Learn what is happening in the body during ESRD and how to live better with this condition.

Learn More »

Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease

The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) has divided chronic kidney disease into five stages to create a guideline to identify and treat each level of kidney disease. The first four stages focus on ways to preserve kidney function for as long as possible, while the final stage—kidney failure—reviews treatment choices. Learn about the five different stages.

Learn More »

Stage 5 of chronic kidney disease (CKD)

In chronic kidney disease (CKD), the kidneys don’t usually fail all at once. Instead, kidney disease often progresses slowly over a period of years. CKD is measured in five stages. Here you'll learn about stage 5 of CKD, also known as the end-stage renal disease (ESRD).

Learn More »

For more information, go to that same website and look at their RECIPE link. It will provide you with many recipes to switch to that will be kidney-friendly and help to slow the progression of CKD.

To answer, many of the other questions you have, go to kidneyschool.org/mods/ and watch and read at your convenience and learn what you need to know. Anything you are unclear about write down and bring those questions with you for your next doctor appointment.

If your doctor again should tell you not to worry, remind her that it's your health and you are concerned and then do whatever you have to and find a different doctor who will work with you. Best of luck.

4 likes
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Thank you so much for your reply and all the information. I'll try not to worry but I do suffer from anxiety and it is difficult. I now exercise more, no longer drink alcohol and drink plenty of water. I just hope these changes will either raise my gfr or at the very least keep it at 62. Will be glad when I have tje next test at the end of this month and can see my results. My husband wants to book a holiday to Canada for this September but I can't do it until I know if my results are worse or not. I know I'm so much better than many who post on here but I feel like my life's on hold.

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Hello tranted

Mr Kidney has given you lots of knowledgeable advice and information. I just wanted to add that please don’t put your “life on hold” - there is absolutely no need, so let your husband go ahead and book that wonderful-sounding holiday to Canada.

You haven’t mentioned your age but as we get older our kidneys can lose about 1% function each year.

With the changes you are making to your lifestyle/diet, and stopping Omeprazole, it is quite possible that your eGFR may increase, but if it remains stable at eGFR 62, you have nothing to worry about.

Many of us are at a much more advanced stage of kidney disease but I doubt many will say they have put their lives “on hold”. I even know someone quite young with young children who has been through the whole gamut of kidney stages to dialysis and then transplant and lives life to the full.

Best wishes and do come back and let us know how you are.....and that you have booked that holiday!

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I completely agree with Celtic. Don't stop your life. Watch your intake of sodium, calcium, phosphorous, potassium and protein. The results of those tests should tell you which ones are a problem for you. Don't eliminate them as your body still needs them, but do cut them down. Be careful on the trip to Canada. If you can ask for a no-sodium meal plan and avoid any red meats. Don't overeat and have fun.

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Thank you for your reassuring words. If I'm stable after my next test on the 29th March I will go to Canada!

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Great - now you’re sounding more positive. Enjoy every moment when it arrives!

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Thank you so much. I'll let you know my next results and when holiday booked. Stay well.

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Mr. Kidney thank you very much for all the research you do, synthesize and share👍

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My nephrologist took me off omeprozole 6 years ago and put me on ranitidine. I believe he said omeprozole is harsh on the kidneys. I have been fine with ranitidine. You didn’t mention your age, I am 70 with a egfr 54 and creatinine 93. I don’t think you have anything to worry about.

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Thank you for your reply. When I mentioned to my gp about omeprozole she wasn't concerned. It was me who did the research and weaned myself off. I have now got a prescription for ranitidine but I'm trying not to take anything. My gfr has dropped by 25 in just over 5 years but I'm hoping with no omeprozole that will either slow or halt the progression. I'm 62 by the way.

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Hi tranted it is good you are able to wean yourself off omeprozole. Unfortunately I need the ranitidine as I do get quite a lot of acid reflux. That is the only medication I take, I rely solely on my diet and have remained stable for 6 years. My egfr was 42 in 2009 and rose to 61 last year, my best ever result. The last blood test showed 54 so that is quite a drop in one year. The egfr does tend to fluctuate quite a lot. Maybe I’m not drinking as much water as I should so will try and improve on that figure. Please keep in touch as to your progress, take care.

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Thank you I'll let you know my next test results in about 3 weeks. Stay well

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Hi, I think you are being wise going off the medicine. Also lots of water is good, I do at least 100 oz a day. Sodium, potassium, phosphorus, smoking, alcohol are all harmful things. I don’t take any vitamins, protein powders, etc. I basically have one great kidney. May have been this way my whole life. A major kidney stone episode recently. Or, the stone could have ruined my kidney.

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Thank you for your reply. I'm trying hard to stick to the right things. Hope things stay good for you

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Thank you! Good blood pressure is essential. So I do a lot of cardio exercise. I gave up dairy a year ago, many positive things.

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My blood pressure is always on the low side 105/68. I do eat dairy but not in excess so hopefully can continue. I'm really hoping that now I've stopped the omeprozole things will either stabalise or get better. It says online that a gfr of 62 with no high blood pressure, not diabetic and I've had a scan which shows kidneys ok is not kidney disease? This is why I'm confused, have I got ckd or not?

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tranted when you say your creatinine was 87 do you mean 8.7 mg/dl or just the number 87 ??

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My results were

Serum Sodium 141 mmol/L (133-146)

Serum Potassium 4.8 mmol/L (3.5-5.5)

Serum Creatinine 87 mmol/L (45-84)

GFR 62

Just hope after next test 29th March everything is better. Everyone on this site is so positive, need to try and be more like that but my anxiety makes ut difficult. Unfortunately I'm a glass half empty person 😣

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Thanks for your answer tranted and you are right about this site, It is a great place to come for support and advice.....

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I think you should be positive. My numbers were all way low, which eventually led to the fact that one kidney is slacking other one great. So my numbers will never be normal again. I do feel like it was a God intervention. I ended up with a huge stone I never knew was there until it dropped. ThenU didn’t know I passed it. I have the most wonderful kidney doctor.

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Thank you for your reply. I hope you stay well

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Usually, from what I know, you cannot improve your gfr. It shows what your kidney's filtration rate is. When there is some damage to your kidneys, that's when your gfr is below 90. If I were you, I wouldn't worry too much. You may never progress. I would make an appt to see a nephrologist and see what you can do so your kidney disease does not progress. A lot of times modifying your diet can help a lot. He may prescribe some medication that will help. Go with lots of questions, so you really understand where you stand.

By the way, I am 18 years post transplant and have been taking omeprazole for over 15 years. And for the last 5 years I have been taking it twice a day. My creatinine is holding at 0.9. I think that goes to show, that everyone is different. Might be bad for someone else to take it, while it seems fine for me. That is why you need to see a specialist and find out the facts, for you and your kidneys.

Take care and best of luck to you!

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Thank you, I hope I can be as positive as you. You sound so brave! All the best

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