Diabetes can be cured,but not by targeting blood sugar:Scientists

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  • just to be clear this is talking about type 2 (insulin resistance) rather than all diabetes.

  • Yes this is all about Type2 ..... but hmmm at the same time..what could be the reason for type 1?

  • type 1 is due to impaired production of insulin by the pancreas. In some cases it can be helped by stimulating the pancreas (eg some MODY variants) but in general isn't going to be curable.

  • ofcoz.. even at present Type2 is also incurable...

    But why in T1 Beta cells gets destroyed by own immune system???

  • sorry - getting a bit too technical for me now :)

    Just wanted people to be aware that the article referred to a specific subset of diabetes and not to all diabetes.

  • sorry friend...

    yes you are right... this is for T2...

    but what they mean is all metabolic syndromes are due to disturbed hormonal functions...

    in our body we have many hormones work ..on feed back loop..and generate various types of cascading effects...

    All metabolic syndromes (even T1) are due to disturbed balance of these hormones...

  • It also depends on the way a person's body reacts to food and other issues in the first place, cure. Not every body is the same and won't function like the one before it (if tested).

  • exactly... there are many known and unknown factors (hormones) governing our bodily functions…also there are external factors and reactions to same by the body…

    It is very complex….

    Everyone is unique…

  • Yes, there are 21 different body constitutions...

  • Hi Cure,

    Your immune system faces a constant and fundamental problem: how to discriminate between your own body and those of potential pathogens like bacteria and viruses. To help the immune system make the right call, we have evolved a remarkable set of molecules called by the acronym MHC (or in humans, the HLA system). These molecules act as 'garbage collectors' constantly sampling molecules present inside our cells and presenting them on the surface to specialised cells of the immune system called killer T-cells. If a killer T-cell does not recognise the presented molecule as ‘self’, it will assume that the cell is infected by say a virus and kill the presenting cell. This is normal and happens all the time we have infections.

    Most of the time, the immune system gets it right, but sometimes it doesn't. If a killer T-cell mistakes a normal presented ‘self’ molecule for ‘non-self’, it will attack and kill the normal cell, even when not infected. This is what happens in autoimmune conditions like type 1 diabetes. Here the immune system attacks and ultimately destroys the beta cells of the pancreas that make insulin.

    Hope that helps:

  • perfect....

    wonderful explanation...

    Thank you...

  • You're welcome!

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