1 billion data records were stolen last year, thanks to poor security

1 billion data records were stolen last year, thanks to poor security

"New research suggests more than 1 billion data records were stolen from more than 1,500 individual data breaches last year... Data breaches were up by 49 percent, while the theft or loss of data records were up by 78 percent on the year prior."

More on this shocking year for website security from ZDNet:


While the stolen records were the result of gaining illegal access to servers storing those records, you can minimise the degree of impact on you from these record thefts by using just these three simple rules:

1) Chose strong passwords - at least for those sites where you have confidential information. Accounts with other, weaker passwords will be exploited before yours ever is.

2) Never reuse passwords. One possible exception to that rule is for sites where you don't really care if someone gains access, but never use that common password (or a variation of it) at an important site.

3) Change your password regularly at important sites and definitely when you hear of a security breach of a site that you've joined. That way, even if your password is captured, it won't be of any use.

If a site offers you the choice of using an email address as your 'username' or one of your choosing, don't use your email address. If your password is cracked, hackers will commonly try using your cracked password (including variations on it) along with your email address at other commonly used sites.

Your community administrators take your privacy and security seriously as do HealthUnlocked. For your own protection, please familiarise yourself with the privacy and security features of this site. There's a link to HealthUnlocked privacy statement at the bottom of every page and much more about security in the Help pages. Finally, check out the following posts:

Online Security Starts with YOU!


Is your computer/phone/tablet secure?



Photo: Crested pigeons make an unusual whistling, whirling, warning alarm on take off which actually comes from the wing feathers


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