Cholesterol Support

High cholesterol and triglycerides?

Hello,

I'm new here and I am writing because I recently had some blood work done and it showed high cholesterol (LDL) and triglycerides and some other things.

I am just kind of puzzled and concerned about this because I am only 17, not overweight, eat a healthy diet and didn't have this problem before. My doctor just told me that it's probably hereditary etc., and that I won't die tomorrow just because I have high cholesterol. However I also take birth control, which according to my gynecologist can increase your risk of blood clots and I frequently feel some pain deep in my leg...should I be worried about my cholesterol and triglycerides? And how could I lower them?

Thanks in advance

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The reason for the blood work was that I suffer from unexplained joint pain and other symptoms (muscle twitching, vision problems, I drink a lot and constantly have to go to the toilet).

The numbers are as follows:

Triglycerides: 5.83mmol/L (normal according to the paper: <2.3mmol/L)

Cholesterol (LDL): 4.02mmol/L (normal according to the paper: <3).

And I agree, my doctor should offer me some more advice, the thing is we just moved so we are still searching for a good doctor.

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That cholestral is normal mine was 8.5 I was put on statins it came down to 4.5 which is peffect lying normal however I've stopped taking the stat insurance up to muscle cramps this is twice over come off them and for nine years I was fine then sent for blood test and put back on 10mg atvorstatin but came off them two months ago my personal choice

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Your triglycerides are incredibly high! This indicates a diet that is high in sugar and simple carbohydrates (white flour products such as bread, pasta, pizza, as well as white rice and white potatoes). Alcohol metabolizes as sugar as well so it is important to keep alcohol consumption to no more than one drink per day.

You should also ensure you exercise daily at least a 30 minute brisk walk each day.

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When you say you eat healthy, what does it mean? If you eat a diet rich in fats from such things as avocados, nuts and olive oil, that would be healthy. If you saying you eat healthy but still eat chips, snacks, doughnuts, cakes and such then you will probably need to change that. If this is the case then the sooner you change the better. You should find lots of help here.

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Whether you are considered overweight or maintaining a healthy diet is subjective. You should seek the counsel of a professional to make an objective assessment.

In general, a healthy diet is one that is virtually free of sugar and packaged food products that contain sugar such as softdrinks and any foods packaged in a box or bag.

Fried foods are unhealthy as is excessive consumption of animal protein. What is excessive? Anything beyond 3 oz per day. Red meat should only be eaten once every week or so, or even less frequently than that. It contains TMAO, increases iron levels excessively in some people and raises uric acid sometimes triggering gout. Your levels of iron will help you determine what is optimal for you.

It is important to have a diet based on fresh fruits and vegetables, supplemented by small quantities of animal protein.

As for your cholesterol issue - cholesterol production by the liver is a response to inflammation in the body.

Inflammation can be triggered by sugar and simple carbohydrates, smoking, excess body weight, stress, or extreme exercise. In the absence of collagen, cholesterol becomes the body's repair kit for damage to the endothelium (inner lining of our arteries). Vitamin C and Lysine together help the body synthesize collagen.

It has been proven that Vitamin C and cholesterol are inversely correlated. The more vitamin C is in the blood stream, the less cholesterol that is produced by the liver.

Therefore, you should begin taking 2-3 1,000 mg tablets of vitamin C daily. Take one about 15 minutes before each of your main meals. At the same time take a lysine supplement also 1,000 mg per tablet.

Vitamin C is a natural substance that is required by the body and does not have any toxicity even at very high doses. You would have to get well beyond 10,000 mg before you might notice some soft stool. There's a lot of misinformation on websites about vitamin c regarding kidney stones and other risks which are not based on sound research.

Vitamin C does help the body store iron though so if you've ever been told you have too much iron or ferritin in your bloodstream, you may wish to resolve that first before using Vitamin C as described above.

Lysine is an amino acid - amino acids are the building blocks of protein and therefore muscle tissue. Once again, the body needs this natural substance and there is no toxicity to its use in the quantity described.

Good luck.

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Well, I barely eat sugary stuff like chocolate (my stomach doesn't tolerate sugar very well) and I am definitely not overweight, I don't drink nor do I smoke and I try to exercise as much as can, however I have exercise induced asthma which makes it a bit hard.

I didn't know that cholesterol production is a response to inflammation, but it could be a possibility in my case as the blood work did show some inflammation...

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It could be your thyroid function then or stress. Consider investigating. Also simple carbs like white flour products - bread, pasta, pizza convert to glucose in the body and can trigger inflammation.

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My HDL cholesterol is 1.55mmol/L and total cholesterol is 7.78mmol/L

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Having 'high' LDL score means nothing. If your Doctor tells you to take a 'statin' to control your 'high' LDL cholesterol, walk out!! Don't waste any more of your time. Having high Cholesterol does NOT cause Heart attacks or Heart disease. It's a HUGE scam on the part of Big Pharma. Eat helthy and say away from Junk Food, ie: McDonald's, Burger King, etc. Investigate the leg pain. Read and learn!

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