Weighted hula hoop for OP- is it a good or bad... - Bone Health

Bone Health
3,055 members1,217 posts

Weighted hula hoop for OP- is it a good or bad idea?

Titian8
Titian8

Ages ago I bought one of those very large weighted hula hoops to start an exercise regime, as read it was very good for the waistline. I found it so easy and could keep it up even watching TV for half an hour or so. (Not so with the standard small ones, which I was rubbish at).

The question is this was before diagnosed with osteopenia in hip and osteoporosis in spine so am now wondering if the constant twist action will be of help or could it cause further damage? I have no idea, would anyone know?

16 Replies
oldestnewest

A nurse on the national osteoporosis society helpline might be able to answer that one: nos.org.uk

Titian8
Titian8
in reply to Met00

Good idea Met00 and will contact them.

I've just ordered the book by Margaret Martin, Exercise for Better Bones, recommended on here, so it will hopefully also give me a better idea on what's suitable. Thanks.

Googling seems to show that many people have benefited. I suppose it would depend on your own condition and if it's something you've been doing it's probably okay, but definitely check with the experts. I have osteopenia in spine and physiotherapist prescribed a gentle twisting exercise to help with pain I had, probably caused by osteoarthritis. I think the real problem is when people are twisting to do something like lift a weight or something, or moving too far and too fast, not so much with controlled motion as in moderate and gentle exercise.

Titian8
Titian8
in reply to HeronNS

Thanks HeronNS for info. I've been hula hooping for a while now and it is gentle twisting and good to know your physiotherapist recommended this for you. I will check with the nos.

I'm lucky as have never experienced any pain whatsoever, no symptoms at all.

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to Titian8

No, she didn't specifically suggest hooping - I never heard of it until this post. But she did prescribe a floor exercise which involves a twist. And whenever she evaluated my condition one thing I had to do was turn my waist as far as I comfortably could. Always quite slowly, which would be different form hooping I imagine as you need a fair amount of momentum to keep the hoop from falling to the floor?

I have been using a weighted hoop for years and love it. I do around 40 minutes every day. I do not know if it is good or bad for OP but some say it is most beneficial. I would be very reluctant to give it up as I so enjoy hooping whilst watching morning breakfast. To my way of thinking the "twisting" is not too vigorous. It is important to do things one enjoys and as I love hooping I shall continue! ;)

Titian8
Titian8
in reply to Kaarina

It's good to know Kaarina that you have been doing this for years (you are way ahead of me!) without any adverse affects. Agree it's so easy to do while watching TV and that's my favourite mode too, and doesn't feel like exercising at all.

I would not recommend hooping to someone else diagnosed with OP even though I have been hooping for years. I have lost a lot of height and have scoliosis. Hooping helps tone abdominal muscles and I do not have a big tummy due to just over 5" height loss and I can eat large meals which some find impossible, as the internal organs get "squashed".

Titian8
Titian8
in reply to Kaarina

Guess so far I've been very lucky. I only became aware I had OP after a scan because had broken a wrist and seemingly that's standard practice for anyone over 50. So have experienced no pain, no height loss etc hence it's a silent process : but now taking it very seriously and doing all I can to remain at current t level or better still reverse it a bit if at all possible.

Kaarina
Kaarina
in reply to Titian8

I was diagnosed with OP after losing height and had a dexa. I had a dexa again recently and no reliable results can be taken because of spinal deformity and degenerative changes in the spine.

The report was taken from my HIPS and the outcome was that both are in normal range . My hip T scores had improved in three years. Whilst happy to hear this, it does not help my spinal problems. I have not broken any bones. I do have some compression at L2 which showed up in a dexa in 2012.

Total hip T score, -0.2 and neck of femur T score, -0.8.

HeronNS
HeronNS
in reply to Kaarina

Your hip score is excellent, isn't it? :)

Kaarina
Kaarina
in reply to HeronNS

Yes, and I am very pleased. It does not solve my spinal issues though .....

Kaarina
Kaarina
in reply to Kaarina

Results could be better than they really are because I was on strontium ranelate. I finished taking this medication around March April time and had the DEXA in July.

Three years ago before i was taking any OP drug my results were total hip score -0.7 and neck of femur T score was -1.4. Spinal T score was unreliable then due to scoliosis and degenerative changes.

Kaarina
Kaarina
in reply to HeronNS

T scores could in fact be showing better results than they really are because I was on strontium ranelate. I finished taking this medication around March/ April time and had the DEXA in July..........

Three years ago before i was taking any OP drug my results were total hip score -0.7 and neck of femur T score was -1.4. Spinal T score was unreliable then also due to scoliosis and degenerative changes.

Droodle
Droodle
in reply to Kaarina

Very interesting especially if you have scoliosis, as I do plus osteoporosis. I will keep this exercise in mind for the future x x

Kaarina
Kaarina
in reply to Droodle

Do get advice, droodle regarding hooping. I have had scoliosis since my teenage years and it never really bothered me. It is only with aging that presumably my scoliosis has worsened hence loss of height and also my spine has weakened.

You may also like...