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British Lung Foundation
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Were inhalers changed in the UK?

Well they don't help anymore. I only get maybe 30-40% of the meds. What they took out was what made the meds go into the lungs. So now I no longer have a true back-up inhaler. Really changed my life. When you only have 25-30% of your lungs you don't have the strength to get the meds in.

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Hi Salis. I agree that the old style puffers seemed to propeI the contents better. I use a spacer for ventolin. It was really helpful when the ventolin worked for me. At my last spiro test two months ago I was told the ventolin no longer had any effect. My lung function was rated at 23% then. However I still sometimes use the spacer with three puffs of ventolin in it when I'm really breathless. It seems to help!

Hope this helps somewhat. Sara.

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Space your inhalations out. With Ventolin, I too use an spacer when I am at home but as it won't fit into my trouser pocket without making me look at worse, deformed, at best, well endowed, I can't usually take it with me. My technique....I have one puff...really give it my best and then wait about five minutes.Let the small amount that I had got into me work and then take the regulation two puffs once i have regained a little control on my breathing. However, Ventolin has not been doing it's job and so I have followed instructions and use breathing control. In through the nose, out gently through pursed lips..works every time, not just when SOB but before doing something that you know affects you...get the oxygen levels up before you do it and use breathing control during it. ( My lung function is less than 20% and it still works).

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Good advice from CBrian. I learnt at PR that you get 50% more of the medication using a spacer.

Spacers work really well with babies and small children who don't know how to inhale deeply at all.

They have a special spacer with a mask attached. Brilliant to see it working . We put 10 puffs of Ventolin in then try and count ten breaths in with the little soft mask over their nose and mouth.

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I know this may sound very silly, but I do hope you don't put the 10 puffs of your inhaler into the Spacer at the same time.

I do know of some who did do this until they were instructed correctly.

One puff at a time.

Thérèse

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I have been told 6 puffs (maximum) sipped from a spacer and call an ambulance as there is Asthmatic reaction in my COPD. Emergency only use of the ventolin with more than the usual dose.

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Thanks Dangirl. I was told by respiratory expert at PR to do the 10 puffs into spacer at once (I can't now because not on Ventolin).

For adults and emergencies only and that it's the equivalent of nebulising.

Must add though that I'd recommend everyone to go by their own medics advice. xx

Oh PS re baby and small children the babies Ventolin is a far smaller and NOT the adults size (and probably not the same dosage as the adult one though I don't know that for sure).

I've had had to help daughter with baby while she cuddled her. Not nice to do but it helped like magic and prevented hospital stays.

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Peeg, please read articles about using a Spacer. It states that only one puff at a time must be used. Repeated as many times as is needed until your dose has been given.

You don't get the full dose if all puffs are put into the Spacer at the same time.

You could always contact BLF to have this confirmed.

Thérèse

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Good Morning, Firstly I would go back to your doctor and explain. There are different types of inhalers - due to cost the blue ventolin inhaler is renowned for poor delivery. My husband always uses a spacer when using that. (Found one on ebay that fits easily in my handbag). But was also given another reliever - Bricanyl which is a "turbo-inhaler". A call to the helpline - click on the red balloon in the corner too, they might be able to help. Take care and keep asking until you get the answers! TAD xx

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hi salis,, first thing is explain to your doc, ,,, he or she should be able to help,,, do you have a nebuliser? as that should make things easier, do you have the airochamber, this helps when you,ve no "puff in",, but the doc. or resp, nurse would def. help you.. good luck,, kindest wishes,,,jimmy

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Many years ago I did see a difference in inhalers maybe the new environmental favourable ones are not as good?

I have been told that inhalers will now give me no benefit. I had a spiro at the doctors and they pumped 6 salbutamol though a spacer and then made me wait 10 mins before repeating the test to have nothing really change. My big test at the hospital showed an extra 12.5% drop when flat but they did not test with any inhalers. It appears I process O2 well but do not get enough in to process?

Joys of RLD and Paralysed Diaphragm

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Hi, my prescription was changed from the pump style Seretide (purple) inhaler to the round style accuhaler and I found I it more difficult to inhale and hold my breath. I asked the Dr to put me back onto the old pump which she did. I find it much easier. X

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Hello folks, just like to help if I can, the inhalers were altered to be CFC free but they were tested and had to maintain the same efficiency to be licensed so if available on NHS they are actually as efficient. They feel as if they have less 'puff' but sometimes the efficiency is maintained by smaller particle size so they get down deeper. Spacers are always a brilliant idea as they hold the drug until (within time limits) you have had time to inhale it. Aerochamber, with or without different sized masks, can be used with all metered dose inhalers (aerosol puffers) as the rubber bit where the inhaler goes in is flexible. It is best to do a puff or couple rather than all in one go as mentioned below for the reason as they said, one puff opens you up a bit better to get the next one down a bit further. Ventolin was the industry standard as was seen as the gold standard and all others had to live up to it to get licensed but the use of the Volumatic spacer was for those who could not breathe well enough to get it in, had larger inhaler requirements or those with co-ordination difficulties including children. There is only one Ventolin CFC inhaler (the powder ones use a higher strength because they do not get as much work done so need to be stronger in strength) and the strength is the same for all. Dry powder inhalers eg Bricanyl, Seretide, tiotropium handihaler etc can be easier to inhale as you set the pace not an acttuator device but the powder does make some people cough so they lose some of the drug and effect. Unfortunately for all of us, our lungs can be irritating beasties and sometimes they just get worse whatever we do so, as the song goes, 'the drugs dont work', at least not as efficently. Having re-read this small essay I realise that it sounds a bit over the top, sorry it was not my intention, just wanted to clarify the information as I work in the trade. If it helps anyone at all it will have been worth it. Best regards to all from qualified asthmatic healthcare personage, er yup I iz qualified asthmatic and qualified healthcare person.

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The new inhalers DO NOT work the same... My doctor was the first one to warn me that they did not put out the same amount for people like me. I am not able to inhale deeply enough to get the full amount. But it is what it is... I talked to the company that made Compivent (sp) it was a life saver for me. They told me they fought the change because they knew that a lot of people would not be able to use them. So it is just another change in my life.

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