Results of ECG Stress test - confused... - British Heart Fou...

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Results of ECG Stress test - confused and shaken

DavidG1971
DavidG1971
31 Replies

I’ll try and keep short.

Dec 2018 had 2 stents into LAD / 95% blocked. Was told I had severe Angina, no heart attack. Left with a minor block (30%) to a non dominant artery. Would treat later if I had any symptoms.

Did my rehab, started playing football. Mostly i feel ok, occasional bit of shoulder / chest discomfort. It’s almost a shadow of an ache.

Did a treadmill stress test in June - had a very slight pain and readings were a little strange at peak exercise. But machine was unreliable...so organised as an ECG stress test.

Did ECG stress test - upto 150 bpm with no symptoms. No letter to follow up so I relaxed. Came off Beta Blockers as they made me very cold. Now finished Clopidigrol.

Last week decided to chase the letter up and turned out that no one sent the results to the consultant. It’s not the same one who did the procedure or treated me initially.

Letter came quickly - and was a bit of a shock. I’ve been signed off, but if read properly, sounds like I have some damage to the heart.

Can someone here interpret what it means? I don’t want to google - confuses and panics me even more.

Any help / clarity much appreciated. My head is spinning.

Thanks.

31 Replies
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sherwood123

I don’t think anybody (with all due respect) on this forum is qualified to give you proper diagnose on your test, go to your doctors and tell him your concerns. Insist on an appointment with a cardiologist , or if you can afford it pay to see one , that’s what I am having to do. Sorry state of affaires , but it will at least put your mind to rest. Good luck

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DavidG1971

Was just in case there was anyone qualified knocking about. Have GP appt tomorrow. Thanks.

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DavidG1971

Not expecting a diagnosis here - hoping someone might be able to explain the terminology. I’m taking it to mean I have some damage to the heart rather than restricted blood flow.

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fergusthegreat

No, David again I'm no doctor but I had the same test 3 months ago and same questions and answers were given by a consultant cardiologist so this is what he told me.

Ischemia that shows at rest and exercise indicates heart muscle damage.

Exercise inducible ischemia ( what is on your report) is normally caused by a blockage.

Again I would recommend seeing a cardiologist to answer your questions but it seems great news that you have no heart muscle damage.

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DavidG1971

Thanks - lady on phone at Cardiology unit seemed to think it suggested some damage. But my GP visit and British Heart Foundation (via email), both thought it suggested restricted blood flow. GP has referred me back to consultant. Thanks for the feedback ....enough consensus to give me confidence.

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Hatchjd

Your angio diagnosis was almost identical to mine I also have 2 stents 90% LAD and 80% circumflex also have 40% RCA that was not stented July 2019. No heart attack. I had an echo the day after the angioplasty that showed myocardial stunning due to ischemia at the location of the 2 blockages on left ventricle. EF 46%. I was told this should improve now that the artery was open but may take many months to heal.

I had a post op stress EKG at 1 month post op for burning chest discomfort that I managed 10 mins at 155ppm without chest pain. I did have some changes in one lead at the top heart rate but cardiologist said no further treatment or change of meds was needed.

I am on Bisoprolol 2.5mg and aspirin. It was decided my pain was not cardiac.

You may want to google myocardial stunning it is common due to lack of blood flow to the muscle when you have had significant blockage.

I am a retired RN and it was a bit of a surprise to me too that I had changes without a HA. The real test is how much better and less tired I feel. I still have the occasional ache but am able to do several hours of hill walking without problem and have regained my power shopping skills.

The heart is a muscle and exercise and healthy eating it is the best therapy to help it heal.

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DavidG1971
DavidG1971
in reply to Hatchjd

Thanks. I’m in a bit of shock to hear that I’ve sustained damage....after hearing the opposite for last year (how lucky I’ve been etc). Still 48 and just want a break to get over it all. Only took 6 days off at the time and regretting it now.

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stillaboveground

Hi DavidG1971, I hope it isn't as bad as the terminology, and you get some answers soon. I had a Heart Attack in May 2019 and I am still getting conflicting reports about what damage was done to my heart. I have an appointment to go for a Dobutamine Stress Echo scan??? Watch this space.

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Purpled

I had one of those last week be prepared for the heart pounding 😱

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stillaboveground

Hi Purpled, Thanks for reply. My heart is pounding before I get there. This thingy is this afternoon.

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DavidG1971

Best of luck. Let us know what happens.

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stillaboveground

Will do

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Purpled

Well did it pound? Lol

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stillaboveground

Most certainly did pound, head felt as if it was going to explode and nausea, otherwise fine, got to wait 2 weeks now for results. take care.

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Purpled

Haha, my head was pins n needles.

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Thatwasunexpected

Certainly not qualified to give a diagnosis, but can take a fair stab at a translation into normal-speak for you.

You kept going on the test for a decent length of time and your heart rate did what it was supposed to - rate failing to rise as much as expected is a pretty big red flag, yours was fine (you reached the target rate for your age)

When you were working at your maximum there were 3 areas on the bottom of your heart that were moving less than the rest.

As a rough analogy, if you imagine sticking patches of tape on a balloon then blowing it up, the taped areas won't move as much as the rest.

Because those segments were moving ok until you maxed out, they're not damage (damaged areas wouldn't move normally the rest of the time) but aren't getting enough blood / oxygen (they're suffering ischaemia) when really pushed hard. But they're quite a small area and only suffering under maximal effort.

The supply to that area is from your left coronary artery (LCA), via your LAD which - as previously discovered - is quite small (a normal variation).

But your LCA (along with about 7 out of 10 people) is "non dominant". That means that it DOESN'T provide the blood supply for the rear third of the middle of your heart. Instead, that area is supplied by your right coronary artery (

That matters because that's where your AV node (the electrical "junction box" between your atria and ventricles) lives. If that loses its supply you've got problems.

Because the area with low supply (but only at max effort) is small, is supplied by an artery that is itself small (so limited scope for opening it up), and that supply isn't relied on by the all important electrical junction, he's recommending that your doctor manages the symptoms with meds rather than risking invasive stuff that may not make much difference to a problem that - while uncomfortable / worrying - is relatively safe as far as anything heart related goes.

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DavidG1971

That’s really helpful. Will take a few reads - but thank you.

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Hatchjd

Great explanation 👍

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DavidG1971
DavidG1971
in reply to Hatchjd

Really is. Can’t tell you what a difference it’s made to our evening. Back to scrabble now.

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Thatwasunexpected

Just don't ask me to suggest any triple word scores :D

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ticking-ticker

As you have already been advised, the explanation from "thatwas unexpected" was top hole - and the sort of advice you can hope to get. but one word of warning - especially as a person that gets "concerned" DO NOT USE GOOGLE as a source of information. I have no idea why anyone could risk using it for such important information. The internet is full of experts, most of them on google, with apparent medical qualifications who want your money, either to register or to make you better, all of which reside in the US. Has no one ever associated google with junk email for one follows the other since the US has totally different privacy rules to ours where privacy is fought for and not a right of passage..........Live well and prosper with exercise and diet and believe in yourself and the NHS, for all that we are told they are. Any NHS web help page can be relied upon for good medical knowledge and advice

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NorthantsSteve

What a fab explanation TWU.

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Heythrop51

Will reread again later. Got a bit lost!

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Dolphin14

That was a great " stab" at it. Good explanation.

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MichaelJH
MichaelJHHeart Star
in reply to Thatwasunexpected

Good post! Nothing I could add.

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rankin1st

Love that explaination, thought about offering training to consultants 😁

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Dolphin14

One big take home from this is always follow up on your results.

A lot of people say, I never heard so things must be ok.

This is an example of paperwork getting lost in the shuffle.

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DavidG1971

Yup - my girlfriend was telling me daily to follow up. Looks like she was right.

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Dolphin14

It is kind of a normal reaction to let it ride thinking it's ok. A lot of people do it.

My husband has had cardiac issue for 22 years. He still does it until I flip out on him lol. I want the results in 24-48 hours so he better have them for me.

Now when you hear someone say it must be ok, you can share your experience and educate them.

Best of luck with everything.

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DavidG1971

Thank you.

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fergusthegreat

It basically means that under increased load ( exercise) a small area of your heart is experiencing ischemia ( reduced blood flow) caused by a partial blockage in your artery.

They normally work out the extent of heart muscle involved and anything below 10% is normally treated medically, above 10% off to the cath lab you go.

Your area is small hence medical management.

I'm not a doctor but this is how it was explained to me by a consultant cardiologist when I had the same test 3 months ago.

I would recommend seeing a cardiologist if you are concerned as he will be able to answer all of your questions.

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