British Heart Foundation
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Longest time a stent has been fitted (without bypass)

Its probably been asked elsewhere on the forum in a different way but what is the longest time members have had their stent in (in years) . I'm going round in circles trying to find out the longest time someone has had one (or more) fitted without a bypass being needed.

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My father had one 10 years or so before he died (I hasten to add that he died of prostate cancer and nothing cardiac related).

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Thanks Steve

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My dad had one about 2004 after two heart attacks. He's still tottering around at 93 with no further cardiac problems.

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A colleague had stents to treat angina in the nineties. We both left the company but maintained intermittent contact. A couple of years ago the angina returned following major surgery for another condition. Around the same time he moved. For around 15 months emails have had no response so I do not know his current situation.

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That still seems quite a long time to have the stents - hopefully he is still around too

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Hi barnie, I too have had this question- after all I have 5 stents!. My cardiologist stated that they can in theory last a lifetime. He was keen to discount what a younger cardiologist(miserable individual) said, he had stated it could be ten to fifteen years or it could be five...!!!. I need to think ,and I am optimistic, that my lifestyle will maximise their life. they don’t seem to have the exact stats yet , although they do know that failure of stents is a very low percentage.

Although we can trust the failure stat I think - stats of how long stents last would be pretty unreliable as will depend on the severity of disease , lifestyle choices, genetics (probably), age, other health issues and no doubt many other variables.

My cardiologist also said these second generation stents are a considerable upgrade on the the first generation stents ( although I have also heard of first gen stents lasting a few decades when internet searching - think I saw that on you tube; but not sure of percentage or numbers; I suspect not high) However, my cardiologist was also keen to point out that stents can be reopened too - so I don’t think necessarily you go straight to bypass. My situation is that they did not bypass as it was decided stents would suffice at my age and that it hopefully gives me the option of bypass at a later stage- If needed. Hopefully it won’t be, but I am accepting it probably will but again I will be battling all the way! as I am sure you will. We also have to consider the likelihood of new medical technology in the coming years. The only thing I would like to know is how they are progressing- to be able to monitor them and be proactive in treatment if needed. This is currently difficult with non- invasive CTCA as images can produce false results although I believe this imaging technology is improving all the time.

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Think i am in the same boat as you David, I'm hopeful my stenting will hold out for many years

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I can quite understand why you’re interested! I also understand that long term studies are not available because the new ones haven’t been used long term. I have nine, so pretty interested in the stats. Also mine are not possible to bypass, so it’s not a fall back. It just depends where they are.

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Yes, I agree stats not available yet. Just as a question can you tell me why some people like yourself have so many stents. My cardiologist drew a picture for me of the arteries affected and there were only three main ones. The stenting I had done were quite long - did you have numerous short ones?

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I think it was from the film 'Widow Maker'; we aren't being given the right information to make an informed decision.

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They started with 5... one major artery, and the four branches of the circumflex artery which stretches, like four fingers, around the back of the heart. Another three were to try and clear the three branches of a Y in an artery, after trying a Y shaped stent, which wasn't successful. Again, not sure where. One stent closed up and had to be re-bored! I’ve had one long one, but it was done with two stents end on.

None, apparently could be bypassed.

This has mostly been done over 2 years and between 3 HAs.

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This is another of those ' everybody is made a bit different ' questions. My mother has had her stent 20+ years ago. Left hospital without this huge collection of drugs we do today, and never looked back. It's luck of the draw I think of what further treatment you ' may ' require as life goes along

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Wow- thats brilliant. Optimistic for all of us with stenting too

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My mate has had his for twelve years...

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A family friend if ours had stents fitted when he was in his mid-late fifties and he's 93 now! As I had 5 stents last year, he's somewhat of a role model to me 😊

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I am unsure if the longevity of the stents (data presented) here could be used to draw any conclusion?

In my view, there are so many variables, like genetics, lifestyle management, severity of the CHD etc the other important factor to consider when looking at the data is the ‘types of stents’ used.

My research revealed that earlier (first generation) stents were just bare metal (BM) whereas now most of us are on so called second generation, Drug Eluted (DES) Stents.

I think it would be illogical to compare the data linked with two different types of stents, one should really be comparing likes for likes.

I appreciate that above does not answer the question OP has asked but the point I am trying to make here is that if you are looking for the longevity of the stents then the type of stents, as well as other factors must also be considered.

Best of luck with your hunt and do come back and tell us if you do find something useful.

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Yes, I do agree. As an aside how is the running going. I was a keen jogger before my HA 3 weeks ago and would like to get back to it eventually but I am feeling very nervous

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Nervousness is natural, don’t worry, we all go through this in some sort of shape or format. In my experience, best way to overcome this is to utilise your rehab session to your advantage by working with the rehab nurses. You have seen the evidence how I overcame that challenge, even then when I went out for the runs alone it was nerve racking but gradually you overcome that fear too.

My running is going backwards, as instructed by the cardio team I am down to three runs per week and not pushing myself at all, very leisurely runs to be honest. I still have deep desire to extend my runs but unsure if there is enough evidence out there which demonstrate that extending my runs would be beneficial for longevity of my heart.

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Its a balancing act isn't it. I think i may have to buy myself a bike and some lycra gear and become a mamil - on the presumption that cycling is possibly less strenuous

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lol, unsure about cycling less strenuous for heart but yeah certainly for joints :-). I guess we can make any cardio exercise less strenuous by tinkering with the intensity levels so yeah give it a go and see how you feel.

When your rehab session will start?

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Hi, my Husband had one fitted eighteen years ago and is just about to have a Bypass though the Stent is still fine.

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