Post ablation: I am scheduled for an ablation... - AF Association

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Post ablation

David21
David21
48 Replies

I am scheduled for an ablation on January 2nd - the 8 month waiting list finally coming to an end. I have researched this and there are many posts on the subject here - 1 practical question please: I am due to present a wine tasting with supper to 9 people at home 8 days later - whilst most of the work can be done in advance - should I carry on with this and what about my own alcohol consumption? thanks

48 Replies
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Padayn01

For me alcohol is a big no no, but everyone has there own tolerance, 8 days after abalation I’ll be getting as much rest as possible to let the heart heal, if I was you I will knock alcohol altogether or at least until 4 months post abalation so the heart can heal

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David21
David21
in reply to Padayn01

Many thanks for this - makes absolute sense

1 like
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BobD
BobDVolunteer

We are all different of course but alcohol should be a miss in my opinion and to rub salt into the wound I have shares in a vinyard! My wife drinks my share.

I really do think that if an EP is prepared to spend a few hours working inside one's heart then we do need to do everything possible to ensure that his work is not compromised.

As far as presentation is concerned then you will probabaly be fit enough to stand up and chat for an hour or so. but please drink LOTS of water to stay well hydrated and make sure you are well rested. I trust that you have read out fact sheet on recovery heartrhythmalliance.org/rec... .

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David21
David21
in reply to BobD

Thanks BobD - yes I have - just seeking more info I guess

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Jalia

I would most certainly avoid alcohol so soon after the ablation.

You may well be fine giving a short presentation ( I would have been) but many on here find themselves somewhat compromised at 8 days

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David21
David21
in reply to Jalia

Many thanks - I am going to cancel

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FlapJack

Lots of good advice David, the only thing I would add is to be very careful not to lift anything much heavier than a bottle! If cases of wine need to be shifted, make sure someone else is around to do the heavy work.

I’m sure you have already seen them, but these factsheets will be helpful.

heartrhythmalliance.org/res...

heartrhythmalliance.org/res...

Good luck, please let us know how you get on (ablation more than the wine tasting) 😉

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David21
David21
in reply to FlapJack

Many thanks FlapJack - definitely cancelling now

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FlapJack
FlapJack
in reply to David21

The wine tasting or the ablation? Hopefully, neither!!

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David21

Just the tasting be a shame to be cold turkey that night as well

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130396

Once you’ve had the ablation just carry on your normal activities

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FlapJack
FlapJack
in reply to 130396

I see from your Health Unlocked history that this is your first contribution to the AF forum and wonder what you have based this advice on.......

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David21
David21
in reply to FlapJack

I'm surprised by that as I have both questioned and replied to others several times

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FlapJack
FlapJack
in reply to David21

Not you David, 130396

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130396
130396
in reply to FlapJack

I base it on my personal experience and advice I was given when I had my ablation 2005

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FlapJack
FlapJack
in reply to 130396

I think that things have moved on in the last 15 years and perhaps more consideration is given to the trauma the heart is exposed to during an ablation which can last in excess of 5 hours. The analogy often used is if your thigh remains heavily bruised for days, think what the inside of your heart must look like.

Most here would take a more cautious view about how best to recover from an ablation.......

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Padayn01
Padayn01
in reply to FlapJack

1000% agree

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David21

Thanks

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pottypete1

Came to this one a bit late but from personal experience I suggest that BobD ’s and FlapJack ’s advice is heeded.

Certainly it is a good idea to give the EP the best possible chance of success by not resuming normal activities for at least two weeks.

Regarding alcohol I decided that being teetotal was the right option too again to give the EP the best possible chance of success.

Pete

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Jt222

Alcohol and/or dehydration triggers my AF, especially the next day. Not worth it to drink more than a very little. As far as the event do as usual, no worries, but let your heart heal after ablation without the drink, just a suggestion.

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Samazeuilh

You could always spit out the wine as professional tasters do?

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Oldiemoldy

I reluctantly gave up drinking alcohol during my very tough recovery from my successful ablation. I needed the full three

Months and then some to get back to normal. I stopped drinking for now because I just couldn’t risk triggering an AF episode. That was 7 months ago. Promised to wait til July 4th to even think about a beer.

It hasn’t been as hard as I thought and my acid reflux is also much reduced.

I also think scheduling anything much only 8 days out from ablation is risky. You don’t know what your recovery is going to be like. Don’t push yourself before your body is ready.

Good luck!

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jezzer

I also chose to give up alcohol following my ablation 2 years ago (I remain AF free). There are a growing number of very drinkable alcohol-free or very low alcohol wines and beers which have made it easier! Good luck with your recovery.

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David21
David21
in reply to jezzer

Thanks to all for responses - isn't spitting rude ? - I jest - very sensible.

As always the Forum is so helpful. Best wishes

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Deacon-L

Hi David, I also have a passion for wine and been a collector for many years, so I totally sympathise with your question. I guess part of you knew the answer but before you asked.👀

I’m surprised to find myself in my 60’s and so many for my wine loving friends now have heart issues. My PAF started with my visits to the Hospices de Beaune weekends, though at the time, I didn’t know it was Atrial Fib - I seriously thought it was a tummy upset/ panic attack. 😂.

I still enjoy wine, but moderately and mostly get away with it if I keep hydrated, stay away from puddings (sugars) etc and have lots of alcohol-free days either side of it.

My advice would be to avoid the event, it’s too soon after the ablation and kind to your body (and family members who care for you).

Take the opportunity of your ablation to have at least a month off wine.

(Great advice from Flapjack about lifting things post ablation. )

And very best wishes for a successful ablation. 👍🏼

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David21
David21
in reply to Deacon-L

Thanks Deacon-L - Clearly wine is a big thing for us both so it is a difficult one - definitely cancelling my January wine presentation. Ironically I am off the Chile in February and have already set up a few vineyard visits - moderation has the be the name of the game. Cheers !

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Alessa69

You have some very good advice here from top posters!

Good that you are cancelling event, however fit or healthy, you may feel, 8 days is just too soon for your poor heart to totally recover . No lifting either , that’s for sure !

Like you, I love wine too, but I’m very careful these days. Make sure to stay well hydrated , it’s so important ,it helps lots

Good luck for your planned ablation

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David21
David21
in reply to Alessa69

Many thanks Alessa

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Mouchkin

I agree with everyone who advises caution. One thing not mentioned though is stress. Is this evening going to worry you at all? Will you have help? Stress can be such an enemy to us and if you feel it might cause you anxiety to host this evening I would cancel. I was pretty weak and wobbly for some time afterwards too...but I am an old codger! It sounds like a fun evening though.

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David21
David21
in reply to Mouchkin

Cancelled now but I suppose there is always stress with that sort of thing - always someone who doesn't like a wine but of course it's not a case of like / dislike - it's really to analyse and try different wines

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Flyer2820

Hi David21. I have had my first and hopefully Last ablation 4 weeks ago and three days after I was out and about almost as normal. I even pushed a wheelchair with a large man in with no problems, although I wouldn't recommend it. We are all different but a presentation should be no problem to you after 8 days. Just take it easy and as others have said no alcohol. Or maybe just a little. We have to get on with our lives.

Good luck with your ablation. Hope all goes well.

Regards Flyer.

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David21
David21
in reply to Flyer2820

Thanks

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trevab40

I am 14 months post ablation and alcohol causes tachycardia for me. It never was an issue before, but definitely is now.

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Contra21
Contra21
in reply to trevab40

When did you need one? My ectopicd are.crippling me fear

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trevab40
trevab40
in reply to Contra21

I had an ablation for svt , 27 years of it. My EP says it was successful. Now I have tachycardia with certain triggers. I didn't have these issues before. I am still undecided if the ablation was worth it. My svt episodes were maybe 4 times a year. I now have issues of some sort almost daily. I'm not trying to scare you, I was under the impression I would be perfectly fine after the ablation and that is not the case at all. I also now have severe anxiety that I did not have before.

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Contra21
Contra21
in reply to trevab40

I have ectopics. How high does hr get for svt. The thumps terrify me

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trevab40
trevab40
in reply to Contra21

with SVT my rate would go to 280. Now it only gets up to a little over 100, but it will happen when I am dead asleep or for no reason at all. So scary to me.

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David21
David21
in reply to trevab40

Apparently the success rate is c.65% but yours sounds bad .. sorry to hear

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trevab40
trevab40
in reply to David21

I some days really wish I had not had an ablation. Thank you! I know many have very successful ablations.

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cpalmermn

I think there is some misinformation here regarding the ‘recovery’ of the heart post-ablation. My EP advised there are no restrictions on cardiac activity post-ablation, which mine is next week. The only post-ablation concerns in the heart is that it forms scar tissue over the next 3 months...which has nothing to do with your activity level. Of course you will need some recovery time from any surgery, I’m making no big commitments for the week after, but the heart doesn’t really need a ‘rest’, it’s gonna keep on doing what it’s supposed to do!

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Mikee69

When did your EP have his last ablation?

Mine was 2.5 years ago.

I remember it like it was yesterday.

We moved house 1 week after my ablation. I could hardly lift a hand to help but I pushed myself and had terrible palpitations for the next two days.

How stupid was that? Someone had fixed my AF and I nearly went and destroyed all his hard work.

It took 3 months to return to pre ablation fitness. Do not underestimate this procedure.

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Mouchkin
Mouchkin
in reply to Mikee69

I really agree with you. For some of us it takes longer and why risk it?

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sugarisit

Remember that alcohol makes you dehydrated, plus some wines, etc. have a lot of sugar in them. Here is the data I have put together for myself - probably will work for you:

---------------------------------

After 9 years of trying different foods and logging EVERYTHING I ate, I found sugar (and to a lesser degree, salt – i.e. dehydration) was triggering my Afib. Doctors don't want to hear this - there is no money in telling patients to eat less sugar. Each person has a different sugar threshold - and it changes as you get older, so you need to count every gram of sugar you eat every day (including natural sugars in fruits, etc.). My tolerance level was 190 grams of sugar per day 8 years ago, 85 grams a year and a half ago, and 60 grams today, so AFIB episodes are more frequent and last longer (this is why all doctors agree that afib gets worse as you get older). If you keep your intake of sugar below your threshold level your AFIB will not happen again (easier said than done of course). It's not the food - it's the sugar (or salt - see below) IN the food that's causing your problems. Try it and you will see - should only take you 1 or 2 months of trial-and-error to find your threshold level. And for the record - ALL sugars are treated the same (honey, refined, agave, natural sugars in fruits, etc.). I successfully triggered AFIB by eating a bunch of plums and peaches one day just to test it out. In addition, I have noticed that moderate (afternoon) exercise (7-mile bike ride or 5-mile hike in the park) often puts my Afib heart back in to normal rhythm a couple hours later. Don’t know why – perhaps you burn off the excess sugars in your blood/muscles or sweat out excess salt?? I also found that strenuous exercise does no good – perhaps you make yourself dehydrated??

I'm pretty sure that Afib is caused by a gland(s) - like the Pancreas or Thyroid - or an organ that, in our old age, is not working well anymore and excess sugar or dehydration is causing them to send mixed signals to the heart - for example telling the heart to beat fast and slow at the same time - which causes it to skip beats, etc. I can't prove that (and neither can my doctors), but I have a very strong suspicion that that is the root cause of our Afib problems. I am working on this with a Nutritionist and hope to get some definitive proof in a few months.

Also, in addition to sugar, if you are dehydrated - this will trigger AFIB as well. It seems (but I have no proof of this) that a little uptick of salt in your blood is being treated the same as an uptick of sugar - both cause AFIB episodes. (I’m not a doctor – it may be the sugar in your muscles/organs and not in your blood, don’t know). In any case you have to keep hydrated, and not eat too much salt. The root problem is that our bodies are not processing sugar/salt properly and no doctor knows why, but the AFIB seems to be a symptom of this and not the primary problem, but medicine is not advanced enough to know the core reason that causes AFIB at this time. You can have a healthy heart and still have Afib – something inside us is triggering it when we eat too much sugar or get (even a little) dehydrated. Find out the core reason for this and you will be a millionaire and make the cover of Time Magazine! Good luck! - Rick Hyer

PS – there is a study backing up this data you can view at:

https//www.cardiab.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2840-7-28

And Oh - if you find that your sugar threshold is lower than 50 grams a day - it's nearly impossible to eat less than that each day, which will keep you in permanent Afib. If this is the case, try going to a Nutrition Response Tester. I am doing this and she has improved my gland processing such that we have increased my sugar threshold from 48 grams a day to about 75, which is high enough to stay under - and keep afib from happening (unless I indulge in a sweet something – which I do too often). Hope this helps.

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David21
David21
in reply to sugarisit

Very interesting - I am not overweight but 3 years ago was put on a sugar free diet (not easy). In 5 weeks I lost 17 lbs - that shows just what sugar can do

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Eastwick

Took me quite a while to recover from my ablation, much longer after the first than the second. I agree with all our friends on here who say take it easy for at least a couple of weeks. Give yourself the best chance of a good outcome

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David21
David21
in reply to Eastwick

Thanks

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Madscientist16

I had an ablation on November 5. I would have not been able to host an event after eight days. I hosted Thanksgiving for family of 7 after 3 weeks and would not have been able to do it without their help. I would have been too exhausted. I did have a couple of ounces of red wine during the dinner, but that was all.

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David21

I can fully understand that

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