Diet

New study below.

I don't exactly bristle when someone with cancer claims to have changed his diet to be "more healthy", but there is usually no indication that any research was involved. After all, we "know" the difference between healthy & unhealthy foods, don't we? However, recent writings on diet reveal how weak the evidence is for a lot of advice coming our way in the past 60 years.

Dr Myers has spoken of new patients who proudly say that they eat a healthy breakfast - oatmeal, juice & whole wheat toast without butter. A disastrous high-carb start to the day in Dr Myers view (& mine). He favors a "Mediterranean" style diet, with carb-fat-protein in Barry Sear's Zone diet ratio. His choice of the Mediterranean diet is based on heart disease studies. Myers, seemingly, did not look at PCa studies, but has said that, for many of his patients, he is trying to prevent death from CVD. A Mediterranean diet is hard to pin down. Wikipedia lists 23 countries bordering the Mediterranean. One could find the PCa rate for each, & look up the national dishes of the countries with the lowest PCa mortality rates, I suppose.

But there is one thing that seems to unite the health-conscious: red meat is to be avoided. The Mayo Clinic definition of the Mediterranean diet has red meat no more than a few times a month. It is up at the tip of the pyramid, along with sweets! Chicken is one level below red meat.

In the new Dutch study, the term "meat" presumably includes chicken, etc - not just red meat.

"After 20.3 years of follow-up ... 399 prostate cancer cases (including 136 advanced) ..."

"no significant associations were observed for ... overall prostate cancer"

"After adjustment for confounders, individuals consuming meat 1 day per week were at a 75% increased risk of advanced prostate cancer compared with 6-7 days per week meat consumers ..."

"Vegetarians, pescetarians and 1 day per week meat consumers did not have a reduced risk of ... overall prostate cancer compared with individuals consuming meat on a daily basis after taking confounders into account."

That should stir up things. LOL

I'd like to know more about that 75% increased risk for advanced PCa. What were those guys eating on the other 6 days?

-Patrick

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/269...

Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 Mar 2. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2016.25. [Epub ahead of print]

Vegetarianism, low meat consumption and the risk of lung, postmenopausal breast and prostate cancer in a population-based cohort study.

Gilsing AM1, Weijenberg MP1, Goldbohm RA2, Dagnelie PC3, van den Brandt PA1, Schouten LJ1.

Author information

1Department of Epidemiology, GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

2TNO, Leiden, The Netherlands.

3Department of Epidemiology, CAPHRI School of Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

The few prospective studies that examined lung, female breast and prostate cancer risk in vegetarians have yielded mixed results, whereas none have studied the effects of low meat diets. Moreover, little is known about the explanatory role of (non-) dietary factors associated with these diets.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

The Netherlands Cohort Study-Meat Investigation Cohort (NLCS-MIC)- is an analytical cohort of 11 082 individuals including 1133 self-reported vegetarians (aged 55-69 years at baseline). At baseline (1986), subjects completed a questionnaire on dietary habits and other risk factors for cancer and were classified into vegetarians (n=691), pescetarians (n=389), 1 day per week (n=1388), 2-5 days per week (n=2965) and 6-7 days per week meat consumers (n=5649).

RESULTS:

After 20.3 years of follow-up, 279 lung, 312 postmenopausal breast and 399 prostate cancer cases (including 136 advanced) were available for analyses. After adjustment for confounding variables, we found no statistically significant association between meat consumption groups and the risk of lung cancer. As well, no significant associations were observed for postmenopausal breast and overall prostate cancer. After adjustment for confounders, individuals consuming meat 1 day per week were at a 75% increased risk of advanced prostate cancer compared with 6-7 days per week meat consumers (95%CI 1.03-2.97).

CONCLUSIONS:

Vegetarians, pescetarians and 1 day per week meat consumers did not have a reduced risk of lung, postmenopausal breast and overall prostate cancer compared with individuals consuming meat on a daily basis after taking confounders into account.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 2 March 2016; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2016.25.

PMID: 26931668 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

5 Replies

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  • I think diet response is comparable to the individual response to different meds. People have individualized cases of advanced prostate cancer - and individualized side effects to different meds - and to exercise, and to healthy eating. Individualized because of our previous 50-70 years of living, environments, experiences, and our current physical and emotional state. Too many variables at play to tie down much causality. it's no-fault insurance. Do what you decide helps. If you've a good rapport with your Oncologist, consult with them - and then do what you decided helps you.

  • "(I)f you've a good rapport with your Oncologist, consult with them" ...

    Yeah, good luck! I have spoken to more than one oncologist over the past few years and they ALL say, as though reading from the same script: "I don't care what you eat, as long as you don't lose weight!" I ask, can I eat meat, can I eat pizza? "I don't care what you eat, as long as you don't lose weight!" is always the stock response.

    So much for advice from your oncologist! LOL!

  • I don't believe everything either on the Internet or in print.

    It's like the guy that says,"I made millions and will show you how by buying my book", then writes, "to make millions, write a book and convince people to buy it".

    I have friends that eat "healthy" exercise, and get rest with no life stresses, and ended up with a heart attack. 2 friends died, and nobody understands how this can happen to someone young and healthy!

    I've met guys at the cancer center with advanced prostate cancer that were in their early 50's. I was 53 when diagnosed.

    So, for me, I also say bull hockey.

    Live your life to the best way you can and let your loved ones know how much they mean to you everyday, and don't stress so much.

    Stress does more harm than any medium rare steak ever did!

  • Patrick, wow that is good to know, soon it will be spring, and according to that study I will be able to do something I have not done in10 years, fire up the grill and have a nice juicy New York steak.

    Thanks for keeping us informed on recent studies

    Dan

  • All concerned,

    N of 1; you are best at what believe is best for you. Exercise and a balanced diet has always been a part of my healthy life style. I shun refined sugar and processed foods, but on a rare occasion will splurge on a Whopper or small steak. We take a vitamin D as a supplement because my lab results indicate the need and due to skin cancers reduces my sun exposure. What I am saying is what works for you is what you will do and how you will live. Please do all but love in moderation.

    The fact that less than 40% of men with PCa have made changes in lifestyle should tell research types something. Life is about living; Just do it!

    PeteG

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