Natural molecules that stimulate dopa... - Parkinson's Movement

Parkinson's Movement

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Natural molecules that stimulate dopamine production may help reverse Parkinson's disease

JayPwP
JayPwP

The team designed the study based on the knowledge that a protein called Nurr1 is key for maintaining the health of neurons that produce dopamine, which helps control a person's movements and emotions. It is thought that decreased Nurr1 effectiveness may lead to a decrease in dopamine levels, which then results in the development of Parkinson's disease.

news-medical.net/amp/news/2...

36 Replies
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Looks promising. Reminds me of the earlier study below that showed addressing demethylating mechanism could modify the gene expression engendering LID. Something that can protect the neurons against neurotoxins and possibly enhance DNA methylation and cell functions while preventing aberrant gene expression without any sign of side effects in a neuroprotective manner is hopeful.

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

JayPwP
JayPwP in reply to rescuema

Hope they pick up the pace for our sake

Jennyjenny2
Jennyjenny2 in reply to JayPwP

It will never happen but wouldn’t it be wonderful if the effort that the whole world is putting into finding a vaccine for covid19 was channeled into finding a cure for Parkinson’s...

JayPwP
JayPwP in reply to Jennyjenny2

The would be vaccine is another concern, who knows what the long term effects would be?

JayPwP
JayPwP in reply to JayPwP

I mean I don't know if my PD is, in part, due to the plethora of vaccines I received as an infant.

Patrickk
Patrickk in reply to Jennyjenny2

Bydureon, a repurposed Type 2 Diabetes drug, is now in third-stage trials in UK for stopping Parkinson’s in its tracks — results expected 2023. Testing — mice, open label, double blind — has been going on for 10 years and it has been positive every time.

scienceofparkinsons.com/201...

I have found some symptom relief (don’t have very bad case) with Tumeric & black pepper (pepper makes it bioavailable) — recommended by a doctor.

According to a very sensitive test, Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR), 2/3 of Parkinson’s patients are supposed to be insulin resistant. I read somewhere that IR may be treated with Bydureon (Exanatide) but I can’t now find the link. Just something that might get us one step closer to Bydureon.

scienceofparkinsons.com/201...

cureparkinsons.org.uk/news/...

PS. I took Bydureon for five years before going into remission on Type 2 Diabetes. Funny if it helped me with both.

JayPwP
JayPwP in reply to Patrickk

I am type 2 diabetes free by following intermittent fasting

Patrickk
Patrickk in reply to JayPwP

In the first 50 weeks on Byetta (early, twice weekly version) I lost 50 pounds without trying -- affected appetite. Had 50 to go though. After 5 years I went into remission.

JayPwP
JayPwP in reply to Patrickk

Interesting hypothesis, IR will cause impaired glucose metabolism in brain cells, making them die off.

Maybe that is why keto works well with PD, providing the cells with alternate fuel (ketones) and keeping them alive.

Patrickk
Patrickk in reply to JayPwP

My interest in an IR diagnoses is as a "legit" path to getting Bydureon -- to stop Parkinson's progression -- without waiting for the UK third stage tests (finishing 2023).

JayPwP
JayPwP in reply to Patrickk

I was just looking it up. It seems 2mg sub-cutaneous once a week has been used in trials so far

JayPwP
JayPwP in reply to JayPwP

Phase 2: content.iospress.com/articl...

Phase 3: clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show...

Jennyjenny2
Jennyjenny2 in reply to Patrickk

When were you diagnosed with Parkinson’s? Was it after you went into remission with Type 2 Diabetes?

Very interesting.

JayPwP
JayPwP in reply to Jennyjenny2

Diagnosed 2015. I was on glimepiride 1mg twice a day. After PD diagnosis, I started studying what helps brain cells survive --> came across BDNF / Growth factors --> BDNF boosted by Intermittent Fasting --> started fasting 16/8 --> 3 months diabetes gone. Fasting glucose 81+-, post lunch 110+-, hba1c 4+- (normal)

I believe it helped with PD as well to some extent

Patrickk
Patrickk in reply to Jennyjenny2

Yes; a couple of years after going into remission. Maybe the Bydureon slowed of stopped my brain cell loss during the time I was using it. The process of losing 80% of those brain cells must have taken many years because the 20% left will take many to further deplete (unless the Bydureon can stop the process).

Jennyjenny2
Jennyjenny2 in reply to Patrickk

Very interesting once again. Thank you 😊

This is interesting news! I have been aware, for many years, that another protein called GDNF, also helps in the production of dopamine.

Can you please tell us more about NURR1? How do we produce NURR1? Can we do anything to increase the production of NURR1?

JayPwP
JayPwP in reply to JohnPepper

GDNF was sabotaged because it could not be patented, and the results were 'statistically' insignificant, the averaged out benefit was 20% improvement. What they didn't realize was individually some experienced benefits upto 80%, or that 20% could have been repetitive over long term.

Statistics at around 6.15 mark: youtu.be/u7zwRNyRz24

Part1: youtu.be/XcZQEct4yCI

Part2: youtu.be/kE6-b9DY3mI

JohnPepper
JohnPepper in reply to JayPwP

Human nature is sometimes difficult to understand! On the one side, millions of pounds have been spent trying to make Artificial GDNF work in an acceptable way. On the other side, I have found that fast walking can and has improved my Pd symptoms and I have assumed that the only way this could have happened was that my brain produces more GDNF when I do the fast walking, because no othere substance has been found to do this.

I also assumed that the reason why that GDNF was produced in the brain was because fast walking is not natural and when I do it, my brain thinks I am running away from danger (Fight or Flight) and produces GROWTH FACTOR throughout the body, including the GDNF in that vital part of my brain. After 4 years of walking, for one hour every second day, My movement symptoms had got so much better that I did not need any further medication.

The cost of carrying out studies on fast walking, as against any other exercise, is not very high. I am sure that Pd patients would not charge for doing the fast walking or any other form of exercise they might feel would do the same job as fast walking. The only expense would be the cost of testing the GDNF levels, before and after the study. If I am correct and they prove to work for all those people doing fast walking, then we have found the answer we, as Patients, need to know and at very little cost we will have got what we want!

Even if fast walking does produce more GDNF, which produces more dopamine, not everybody with Pd would be able to do fast walking, but even if only 30% of patients get that result, that means over 3 million Pd sufferers throughout the world would not need medication, with all its side effects, to live acceptable lives with their Pd. Would that not be worth spending a small amount of money to carry out that test over a six month period?

Back to the human nature. Fast walking does not put any money into anybody's pockets! That same human nature has tried very hard to make other patients believe that I do not have Pd, Be that as it may, those same trials would answer that question at no extra cost.

I contend that we, as Pd patients make that study ourselves and satisfy ourselves that I am either right or I am wrong, What have we got to lose? Everybody who does the fast walking would get the benefit of becoming more fit and therefore more healthy. For those who do not improve, the boffins can find out what the differences are between the symptoms of the people who do get better and those that don't. Then we can take it from there.

Don't get too excited about this because we, as patients, will not get any backing from the medical profession, who stand to lose patients if it does prove to work. They can give us all a whole load of reasons why we should not do this, but what do we stand to lose by doing so?

I am now nearly 86 and have had Pd symptoms since 1963. In 1992, when I was finally diagnosed, I had to give up my position as chairman and founder of my very successful printing company, because of my Pd symptoms. I have been examined by four different Neurologists, who all found that I do have Pd. I consulted two of those neurologists in order to satisfy everybody that I do have Pd,

Who is going to pick this up and run with it? I am getting too old to organise any studies!

I did not only do fast walking, I learned how to use my conscious brain to control my movements (tremors, shuffling and freezing) to name a few. I have been able to prove. that EVERY PATIENT, who was shown how to use their conscious brain, including every patient confined to wheelchairs, WAS ABLE TO DO SO. One hundred percent success is proof to me that what I amable to show the whole world, really does work.

Before I pop off this mortal coil. why does nobody want to do something about it?

JayPwP
JayPwP in reply to JohnPepper

I used to run a screen printing unit, inhaling thinner / turpentine used for thinning the ink, almost 13 hours a day. Do you think that can be a causative factor?

JohnPepper
JohnPepper in reply to JayPwP

Hi JayPwP. Because I am not a medical man and because I already have Pd and have had symptoms since 1963, I felt it was a waste of time finding out what caused it. I am far more interested in whet will cure it.

I have not found a cure but I have found a wy for me and others to start living a normal life again.

I also worked with a strong chemical to clean the rollers on accounting machines. It had a pleasant smell but I oftejn wonder if it had something to do with my Pd. What difference does it make?

JayPwP
JayPwP in reply to JohnPepper

True

Rosenmu
Rosenmu in reply to JayPwP

There's a lot of hypothesis on toxins and PD, most of it pointing to yes, toxins do play a part. Toxins attach to the alpha synuclein causing mis folding and transport to the brain. I drank well water tainted with farm chemicals for 30 years and did a lot of spray painting, also played in an old chicken barn as a kid heavy with pesticides.

JayPwP
JayPwP in reply to Rosenmu

Unfortunately in INDIA, most of the toxicity tests are not available or obscure and impossible to find.

Heavy metal tests, mold infection tests are unavailable.

Even functional medicine (known as root cause medicine) doctors are not interested in finding the root cause.

Where are the Mischley's and the Hinz's for us?

I was impressed with your fast waling method and the fact that you never meet anyone that was not able to follow your method (in your video). I do not understand that statement a person at level 4 or 5 would have a lot of difficulty at best following fast walking. Can you explain your approach to help a person with sever waling and mobility problems

I know it sounds like a tall story, but it has been perfectly true. Everywhere I went, when I saw a person with Pd in a wheelchair; I sked them if they wanted to try to walk properly. In every case they said yes. I then asked if they were still able to stand on their legs without anybody else helping them, other that to stop them from falling over.They said yes!

I then explained that their walking is normally controlled by their subconscious brain, which does not work properly with Pd. I then told them that their conscious brain was still able to control their walking and then set about showing them how.

Yesterday afternoon I showed a Japanese lady and her physiotherapist how to do it on a Zoom call. She immediately started to walk normally and started to cry, and the people with her all shouted and there were tears everywhere.

Her neurologist was with her and I spoke to him as well. The only question he had was, "Does it not make you tired very quickly?"I said "No". I had not had that problem.

I must have shown over 50 people in wheelchairs how to walk properly. If you want to Zoom me I will show you how as well.

HeartSong
HeartSong in reply to JohnPepper

John, not long after I was diagnosed with PD (approx. 7 years ago), I read your book and tried fast walking. I tried several days a week for several months, but I could never go any faster than when I first started. I was surprised and frustrated.

I'm up for trying again. However, I have an old computer which doesn't have real time video capabilities. Is there some place on YouTube or elsewhere that I can find a pre-recorded video of you showing someone how to walk properly? Thanks.

JohnPepper
JohnPepper in reply to HeartSong

Yes there are 4 or more videos on youTube. Just enter my name.

AS far as the walking goes, you did not listen to my instructions properly. You did too much, too soon.

Start fast walking at YOUR best speed and DO NOT WALK LONGER THAN WHEN YOU START TO FEEL TIRED. You will probably only manage to walk at your fastest for a lot less then 10 minutes. Whatever it is, THAT IS WHAT IT IS!

Then, and only then, after every second week you add a few minutes to your time, with a maximum of 5 minutes and walkflat out for that new time for another two weeks.

The symptoms only get better when you walk flat-out. The time spent walking is of no consequence. 2 Minutes fast walking is better than an hour at anything less than your fastest rate.

JayPwP
JayPwP in reply to JohnPepper

All I could find but could not understand:

en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuc...

Will keep digging

JohnPepper
JohnPepper in reply to JayPwP

What is the diifernce, if any, between NURR1 and GDNF?

JayPwP
JayPwP in reply to JohnPepper

Also CDNF, have a look below at my reply

healthunlocked.com/parkinso...

CDNF

CDNF is not the same as GDNF, which means Glial Derived Neurotrophic Factor, not what you are talking about.

JayPwP
JayPwP in reply to JohnPepper

Yes john, I know. My reply was regarding CDNF showing promise, same as NURR1

PNT article from 2019 on Nurr1:

parkinsonsnewstoday.com/201...

The good old prostaglandin and Nurr1, will not be too natural and easy to stimulate in the body and therefore not candidate for a new patent drug?

Roy?

healthunlocked.com/parkinso...

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