Unbelievable

While I was at the Hospital a few days ago I noticed a woman in a wheelchair outside the front door rolling a cigarette! Half her leg was missing, I don't know if it was a recent amputation but it was freshly dressed. That happened to a friend of mine many years ago, and he continued to smoke until he then lost his other leg, and continued to smoke then he lost his life. Nicotine is a really powerful drug, but it can't beat us because we have the strength of the forum to help us.

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  • It's really easy to feel disdain for "The stupid smoker" but up until about three weeks into stopping and feeling the benefits did I really believe how dangerous smoking was, sure, I've lost more family members to cancer than any other cause, most of them smokers, my father is currently undergoing treatment for lung cancer, kidney polyps and a prolapsed colon, a lifelong smoker, my cousin has had one leg amputated below the knee due to circulatory problems, he will lose the other one imminently, again a smoker - but up until a couple of months ago they could have removed all four of my limbs and I would have 100% believed they were exaggerating the effects of smoking, as every single time I went to the doctor they blamed the fags as soon as they knew I smoked. It was only in the early days of quitting that I developed a compulsion to find out as much as I could into the effects of smoking that it hit me just what I was doing to myself. I would hate to become "that" ex-smoker, the one who thinks just because they have stopped the world should follow suit :rolleyes:

  • Stupid Smoker ????????

    I appear to have ruffled a few feathers which was definitely unintentional. Nowhere in my post did I call the lady stupid, if anything I felt very sorry for her, and I realise it could easily have happened to me ,and may still happen. but the reason behind my post was to to help people who maybe struggling including myself I am quite shocked by your comments.

  • It's really unbelievable the power that nicotine has over everyone who smokes. Instead of concentrating on healing and getting better, she was concerned with having her next cigarette.

    Rex didn't say anything about this woman being stupid, but there was an inference to her condition being from smoking. If her condition was actually from smoking, she was acting stupid. Either way this is an excellent example of how terrible nicotine and smoking really is.

    -Tim

  • I appear to have ruffled a few feathers which was definitely unintentional. Nowhere in my post did I call the lady stupid, if anything I felt very sorry for her, and I realise it could easily have happened to me ,and may still happen. but the reason behind my post was to to help people who maybe struggling including myself I am quite shocked by your comments.

    I agree with Karri on this one, I too called her stupid. I was also calling myself stupid for not heeding the dangers until I was well and truly mounted on my sanctimonious high horse. I just believe the further into our quits we get, the easier it is to forget how tough it is for those wanting/trying to quit, and feeling some sort of camaraderie with those for whom the light bulb is yet to shine, as I remember feeling like the non smoking world was out to get me and that it was all a conspiracy to get me to stop something I thought I enjoyed.

  • Rex

    Your post was fine my love.

    Something that has stayed with me for 10 years is when my mum was terminally ill and admitted to a Hospice, just for pain control and respite initially. It was the most wonderful place ever, lovely two bedded wards, beautiful, grounds, full of deer, squirrels and robins, (it was Christmas and she was in for respite/pain relief). The nurses were just amazing, caring Angels.

    Anyway, back to story, it was nighttime, and whilst mum was settling in we were waiting just beside what turned out to be the smoking lounge and a couple of nurses wheeled a gentleman through on his bed from a ward and threw a huge smoke protective blanket over his bed bed sheets and gave him an ashtray on his tummy.

    To say I was gobsmacked, never in a million years did I expect to see that. Not sure if that still happens now, but back then it did. Said gentleman had a cig, and gestured us (myself and DH) to talk to him, which of course we did.

    Him and my mum made friends and enjoyed many a smoke in the gardens all wrapped up or in the 'smoke room''. They both sadly passed away within a few days of each other in March the following year. Both had the big C, both smoking related).

    Their professions, the gentleman was a Retired Doctor and my mum a Nursing Sister, so they certainly weren't stupid.

    Haven't shared this before, god I miss her, did it stop me smoking aged 43, no it took another 10 years (sept 2012) for me to do that, now that was STUPID.

    Fi x

  • A chap I knew in passing collapsed on his doorstep and was taken into hospital with disastrously low oxygen levels in his blood caused by smoking. He was in hospital for quite a while and when he came out he was on oxygen and in a motorised wheelchair.

    Several months after the event I spotted him in a motability scooter puffing away on a fag while using oxygen via a tube to his nose:confused::confused::confused:

    I've not seen him recently, he was in his 60's I'm guessing that he's either unable to leave the house now or dead.

  • I too have had the warning signs...

    I suffered about 6 times in the last 8 years with Lung spasms. These were caused by increased smoking where as Nic Firth commented on (I think) causes less Oxygen in the blood. More than once I have been admitted to hospital to be put on oxygen, and have needles take blood from my wrist to check the blood flowing through my heart. Ive had to have that gas thing that lights up your heart and lungs in order to have my chest scanned. Im only 36. This all started BEFORE I left my 20's. More recently, I was diagnosed with CIN 3 pre-cancerous cells to the cervix (my mom had a hysterectomy at 32 due to cervical cancer, she is a smoker and now has COPD), still receiving treatment 2 years on....and I carried on smoking through it all.

    You never believe its the smoking, you believe its all non smokers hype, that they are just trying to single us smokers. Yet now, well im hoping for a better result from my cervical test recently.

    Its not easy, no matter what you go through, to accept the relationship with smoking. Its not easy to accept that this relationship is damaging us the way it does. No matter the evidence put before you, its human instinct to think "it wont happen to me" or "it wont get any worse"...even those who have warning signs like me and possibly that lady at the hospital. I don't thinks she is stupid, because its also true that we don't know her life. But I would have thought the same thing about her.....

    WE on here, on this forum, we have seen what it has been doing to us, to people around us, we have accepted the relationship we had with smoking, and made our choice. Its not easy, its very hard to make that choice at the beginning, and some do find it easier than others to make the choice and stick to it. But, that means its also up to us to help others, to help them understand, to help them through the tough times, which in turn helps ourselves. There is more help and advice available now than there has ever been, more knowledge of what smoking does to us. Whatever damage, large or small that I have done to myself, I pray that my little 6 yr old NEVER smokes, she is already against it, due to the adverts and advice that is shown everywhere now.

  • "Unbelievable"

    Thank you Karri I'm sitting here seething after reading Rex 1000's post about the lady in the wheelchair.

    Contempt prior to investigation springs to mind, a very dangerous state of mind.

    Hopefully the lady in the wheelchair was not being treated for a smoking related illness and thoroughly enjoyed her ciggie.

    Michael a.k.a:- lefoy123

  • It's a b.loody evil addiction.

    None of us here are stupid, far from it but look at what we told (or tell) ourselves.

    Family members get ill or die because of smoking, it takes ages to stop.

    We notice things wrong, some of them serious, and it takes ages to stop. Got a nagging cough last year, which coincided with my smoking heavier and I denied it, thought it would go away - it did after I stopped and coughed up all kinds of crap, so hard I threw up several times.

    It's not just us on here, one of my neighbours died about a year ago, he always had a fag in his mouth and he died pretty much with an e-fag in his hand.

    Am a bit isolated from it as I'm the only smoker in my immediate family (can think of one uncle who smokes, that's it) so thank God I don't have anyone close to me who's died of smoking. I'm also young and rather immature so that gives the demon a way to have a go at me. :mad:

    What is b.loody stupid is that after having and blowing a 10 and a half month quit, I know far more about smoking than before. Not just the health part, but the mental part of it as well but my stupid mind hasn't made the leap from knowing it to actually grasping it. :mad:

    It upsets me and it annoys me. I know smoking is a smelly, expensive habit, I know what every fag does to me, that it doesn't solve anything, it only relieves the craving the last one did, I smell, am a drug addict, it makes my family (especially my dad) worry about me, so why the buggery flip can't I quit and stay quit?

    Thing is I'm not mentally ready for another go, but when will that be? When I'm on oxygen? Inhalers, when the doctor says "I'm sorry Gemma you've got cancer"?

    Am nearly crying TBH

    Sorry for the rant. :(

  • Oh Gemma-Lou, dont be upset......

    My point exactly in my post above. Its a decision that is incredibly hard to make, some make it in time, others don't. Sometimes, like me, you end up having sign after sign after sign, before you finally see it, before you finally accept it.

  • Gemma Lou, the thing you need to remember is that you did it! 10 months!!! Mentally, it is difficult, I know that. But if you can do 10 months, well, you can do the rest of your life!! Give yourself time and don't beat yourself up or scare yourself. You know the facts, and you will be ready before you know it, im sure of it x

  • Oh Gemma-Lou, dont be upset......

    My point exactly in my post above. Its a decision that is incredibly hard to make, some make it in time, others don't. Sometimes, like me, you end up having sign after sign after sign, before you finally see it, before you finally accept it.

    Gemma Lou, the thing you need to remember is that you did it! 10 months!!! Mentally, it is difficult, I know that. But if you can do 10 months, well, you can do the rest of your life!! Give yourself time and don't beat yourself up or scare yourself. You know the facts, and you will be ready before you know it, im sure of it x

    Aww thanks :)

    Know I will stop but it's when :( and to be totally honest am scared of stopping again :(

    Wish I could go to sleep for 2 months and wake up cured!!

    Well done youf for quitting!! x

  • Gemma-Lou,

    It is scary...I think maybe because you stopped for so long, and went through so much to achieve 10 months, you know what to expect, and that could be what scares you?

    My advice, without pressure, don't wait. Find a really big hill (Clee Hill in Shropshire is amazing for this! lol), climb to the top and SCREAM!!! Scream out your fears, your whys and why not's. Get them out of your head, it will make a bit more sense to you then. That way, you can segment everything, and maybe be ready to try again. You know there is support here, so scream on here if it helps?

    Talking of Clee Hill, I walk there quite alot, its harsh, very cold, and barron. But lovely with it. Anyway, the hills are quite steep, and as a smoker I walked them and climbed them. I went again a couple of weeks ago, first time since I quit, and climbed them again, but took my 6 yr old with me. It was amazing! No breathlessness, nothing. Is there somewhere like that by you? Getting outdoors and looking at natural scenery is known to freshen and cleanse the mind (I sound like a hippy but im a brummie gal!) especially this time of year!? Im not trying to pressure you to quit, but its something you want, then its worth trying anything and everything to get it :) x

  • Thankyou x Its been a slog sometimes, but at my age (cos im getting on now at 36!) its something I really needed to do given my past health, plus the want was the strongest its ever been for me x

  • Thankyou x Its been a slog sometimes, but at my age (cos im getting on now at 36!) its something I really needed to do given my past health, plus the want was the strongest its ever been for me x

    Oh to be 36 again :rolleyes:

  • Gemma-Lou,

    It is scary...I think maybe because you stopped for so long, and went through so much to achieve 10 months, you know what to expect, and that could be what scares you?

    My advice, without pressure, don't wait. Find a really big hill (Clee Hill in Shropshire is amazing for this! lol), climb to the top and SCREAM!!! Scream out your fears, your whys and why not's. Get them out of your head, it will make a bit more sense to you then. That way, you can segment everything, and maybe be ready to try again. You know there is support here, so scream on here if it helps?

    It's really because I messed it up, know where i went wrong and believe me it's not typical - most people on here who quit the same time or after me are total non-smokers now. My ex-quit buddy is too.

    Won't bore you with the details but I ended up making myself feel rubbish, which again gives the demon plenty of ammo to use against me.

    And it's so frustrating to have stopped so long and be back to square one.

    Talking of Clee Hill, I walk there quite alot, its harsh, very cold, and barron. But lovely with it. Anyway, the hills are quite steep, and as a smoker I walked them and climbed them. I went again a couple of weeks ago, first time since I quit, and climbed them again, but took my 6 yr old with me. It was amazing! No breathlessness, nothing. Is there somewhere like that by you? Getting outdoors and looking at natural scenery is known to freshen and cleanse the mind (I sound like a hippy but im a brummie gal!) especially this time of year!? Im not trying to pressure you to quit, but its something you want, then its worth trying anything and everything to get it :) x

    Oh that's fab, know how good that feels!!

    Where I live it's very hilly, and remember being breathless climbing some of the very steep ones before - then when I quit climbing the same ones breathing through my nose rather than panting. Don't dare try it now :(

    Thankyou x Its been a slog sometimes, but at my age (cos im getting on now at 36!) its something I really needed to do given my past health, plus the want was the strongest its ever been for me x

    Lol, you're definitely not getting on!!

    If you really want it then I'm sure you'll do it :D

    x

  • Gemma-lou,

    You will get there, im sure of it. Everyone has their own reasons for quitting, or falling off the quit. To some, it may be silly, to others it wont be. The important thing is what they are to you, as you said, you know what triggered it and that is a good thing! Everybody's quit is different and individual is so many ways, yet in many they are the same. Don't let the fear win, take your time, face it and your strength will come through again for you :)

    My reason, truth? I didnt really have a reason! I had a chest infection and couldn't breath properly for 7 days, my quit initially was to use the patches with the excuse of doing Stoptober, in my head, it was just until I felt better....that's a fact. BUT, for some reason, my mind changed, I just thought "ok, lets see how long I can last then!" It was a duel with my own head, which ended up in me deciding, " actually, im gonna do this!! Im gonna keep on!"

    I won. And you will too. Ive failed umteen quits, ive lost count! You may find the right time will creep up on you without even knowing it Gemma x

  • I wasn't going to post on this thread, but I'm really getting a bit angry about a few bits of "holier than thou"-ness which have sneaked in, re smoking during illness. My Dad had a brain tumour and secondary lung cancer. He was in a hospice. He had smoked since age 14. I was glad that the staff at the hospice would let me wheel him outside for a ciggie. I was glad that the staff would also wheel him outside for a ciggie when I wasn't there. I supplied the fags because he wanted them. We have all been addicted to the damn things. We all "used" them when we were "having a bad time". Can a person who knows that they only have a few weeks left to live not have a fag if they want one? The damage has already been done.........why make that person suffer more by stopping them from having a damn fag when they want one?

    Val

  • (((Gemma))) you will get there again. Why not try a quit but don't announce it and see how you get on. If it doesn't work out at least you will know what the pitfalls were and how to arm yourself for the next time. The truth is you won't know if you are ready until you try.

    If you don't feel ready to try maybe just pick a quit date and start preparing.

    Aww thanks Karri :)

    I definitely will when I think I'm up to it, then if it works I can jump into week whateveritis, and if it fails there's no pressure on me!!

    Is that what you're going to do?

    ((hug))

  • I have been doing it. I have found my weaknesses and been working out ways to overcome them. I've also tried different NRT products to see if any of them suit me.

    I have learnt that the physical withdrawal doesn't affect me in the least, it's the psychological. So I'm going with the advice of using patches for a while to get me in the habit of not smoking. I had an allergic reaction to one brand but my GP said I will be fine with Nicorette ones.

    I have picked a date where I have nothing on so I can hide away in bed for a few days if I need to.

    I found the advice on my failure thread really valuable and I read it every day. Kats post on here was the final piece of the jigsaw.

    This forum is a lifeline in so many ways. It keeps picking you up and eventually you realise you want to stay up.

    I know you will get back to your quit Gemma and you are going to be amazing :)

    Oh that's brilliant!!

    I really hope this is going to be the one for you - you deserve it!!

    Know exactly what you mean about the psychological part - it's where I fell down this time.

    Am sure that you can do it, we're here for you!!

  • I wasn't going to post on this thread, but I'm really getting a bit angry about a few bits of "holier than thou"-ness which have sneaked in, re smoking during illness. My Dad had a brain tumour and secondary lung cancer. He was in a hospice. He had smoked since age 14. I was glad that the staff at the hospice would let me wheel him outside for a ciggie. I was glad that the staff would also wheel him outside for a ciggie when I wasn't there. I supplied the fags because he wanted them. We have all been addicted to the damn things. We all "used" them when we were "having a bad time". Can a person who knows that they only have a few weeks left to live not have a fag if they want one? The damage has already been done.........why make that person suffer more by stopping them from having a damn fag when they want one?

    Val

    I agree with you, a smoker suffering from a terminal illness, whether it be smoking related or not, should have a fag if they want one - we all know how horrible it is to be gagging for a smoke and I think forcing someone to go through withdrawal symptoms on top of their mental and physical anguish is unquestionably cruel. I think most of us are just saying how we denied the damage we were doing to ourselves and that for many of us even accepting it was not enough to make us quit at that time. For example, our local heath authority has banned smoking on all hospital property, including all outside spaces and car parks, meaning you see patients out on the street, in their night attire whatever the weather, having a cig - the holier than thou attitude doesn't make smokers smoke less, just makes them risk pneumonia to get their fix and those who can't get up and about have to go through an unwanted quit, only to start again as soon as they're home. IMHO a little bit of live and let live is the only answer to this one.

  • I agree with you, a smoker suffering from a terminal illness, whether it be smoking related or not, should have a fag if they want one - we all know how horrible it is to be gagging for a smoke and I think forcing someone to go through withdrawal symptoms on top of their mental and physical anguish is unquestionably cruel. I think most of us are just saying how we denied the damage we were doing to ourselves and that for many of us even accepting it was not enough to make us quit at that time. For example, our local heath authority has banned smoking on all hospital property, including all outside spaces and car parks, meaning you see patients out on the street, in their night attire whatever the weather, having a cig - the holier than thou attitude doesn't make smokers smoke less, just makes them risk pneumonia to get their fix and those who can't get up and about have to go through an unwanted quit, only to start again as soon as they're home. IMHO a little bit of live and let live is the only answer to this one.

    IMO that kind of thing makes a lot of smokers more determined to carry on to stick their fingers up. It used to have that effect on me.

    And yes it is cruel, smoking, whether people like it or not, is legal and I think that while it is, smokers shouldn't be picked on. Sure ban it in public buildings but they're going too far now IMO.

  • I wasn't going to post on this thread, but I'm really getting a bit angry about a few bits of "holier than thou"-ness which have sneaked in, re smoking during illness. My Dad had a brain tumour and secondary lung cancer. He was in a hospice. He had smoked since age 14. I was glad that the staff at the hospice would let me wheel him outside for a ciggie. I was glad that the staff would also wheel him outside for a ciggie when I wasn't there. I supplied the fags because he wanted them. We have all been addicted to the damn things. We all "used" them when we were "having a bad time". Can a person who knows that they only have a few weeks left to live not have a fag if they want one? The damage has already been done.........why make that person suffer more by stopping them from having a damn fag when they want one?

    Val

    I take it was my story of my late mum you are referring to ...

    Like Karri, I was the one who supplied my mum and her newly acquired friend in the Hospice with cigarettes. The point I made was that in my ignorance I was surprised it was allowed in a hospital setting indoors.

    Mum and Co/patients went on to enjoy many a cig and a wee dram in that said smoking lounge premises, good on them.

    Sorry if I've caused any probs, it was not my intention to come across holier than thou. I intimated I was the stupid one continuing to smoke after watching my mum die, far too young.

  • Thank you Karri I'm sitting here seething after reading Rex 1000's post about the lady in the wheelchair.

    Contempt prior to investigation springs to mind, a very dangerous state of mind.

    Hopefully the lady in the wheelchair was not being treated for a smoking related illness and thoroughly enjoyed her ciggie.

    Michael a.k.a:- lefoy123

    Micheal. Seething:mad:

    I suggest you re read the post. At no time did Rex assume the reason for the lady's amputation.

    He did however, in the second sentence go on to tell us of a friend that did have

    the procedure done due to smoking related problems.

    Now I'm the one who's seething, I'm out of here

  • I take it was my story of my mum you are referring to ...

    Like Karri, I was the one who supplied my mum and her newly acquired friend in the Hospice with cigarettes. The point I made was that in my ignorance I was surprised it was allowed in a hospital setting indoors.

    Mum and Co went on to enjoy many a cig and a wee dram in said premises, good on them.

    Sorry if I've caused any probs, it was not my intention to come across holier than thou. I intimated I was the stupid one continuing to smoke after watching my mum die, far too young.

    I actually brought tobacco back from Spain when I went in October for my sister who has emphysema (COPD). I really didn't want to but I realise now that she will not give up and it is her choice. My sister is getting worse by the week but insists she will not quit as she 'loves smoking' It does not matter what I say it really is her choice but I am worried to death about her and wonder what it would take for her to quit? I agree there was an assumption in Rex's post but he did not call the lady stupid and really all he wanted to say was thank god for this forum that he feels has been a big part of helping him quit. If I see someone on oxygen I assume they must have been a smoker when in fact it could be cystic fibrosis or another lung condition not related to smoking. I think it is because we are all so aware about smoking because we are either trying to quit or have quit, it becomes all consuming.

    Don't worry Fi, you haven't caused any problem or come across as holier than though, your story was about love, the love you had for your mother .

  • Karri / Haze

    I'm fine, thank you:)

    Fi xx

  • I take it was my story of my late mum you are referring to ...

    Like Karri, I was the one who supplied my mum and her newly acquired friend in the Hospice with cigarettes. The point I made was that in my ignorance I was surprised it was allowed in a hospital setting indoors.

    Mum and Co/patients went on to enjoy many a cig and a wee dram in that said smoking lounge premises, good on them.

    Sorry if I've caused any probs, it was not my intention to come across holier than thou. I intimated I was the stupid one continuing to smoke after watching my mum die, far too young.

    Ah, then I totally misunderstood what you were getting at......and I apologise. :) When you said that you were gobsmacked, I took it to mean that you were horrified, rather than surprised. I am sorry. :o

    Like you, I carried on smoking even though smoking had taken my Dad; such is the power of the addiction.......or so it seemed. Now, when I look back at that time I can't grasp how it had such a hold on me. I'm quite bewildered by it. :mad: Still, hindsight is wonderful, isn't it, and we cannot undo the past. But we can make much better futures for ourselves. :) Here's hoping that we all stay strong in our quits!

    Val

    xxx

  • Micheal. Seething:mad:

    I suggest you re read the post. At no time did Rex assume the reason for the lady's amputation.

    He did however, in the second sentence go on to tell us of a friend that did have

    the procedure done due to smoking related problems.

    Now I'm the one who's seething, I'm out of here

    Mr/Mrs/Ms Nutmeg re-read my post I gave no reasons for the fact that somewhere along the line the lady had had an amputation either. However Rex1000 made the association citing his friend who had an amputation.

    Have you found your dummy yet ?

    Michael a.k.a:-lefoy123

  • Haze, I hope your sister can find it in her to quit. I know most people who smoke and tell us they enjoy their smoke, or it is all they have, or they don't want to quit. Really do want to quit , they say they will at some point but are afraid to quit, they just keep putting it off.

    I know this I was there, I would attempt and fail , and to be honest my first few fails were due to not being really ready in my own head. Last time well it was a factor of things, and I am now back, and I was afraid like lou to actually make the attempt, so far so good.

    Haze like your sister my sister was ill, and smoked like a train. She was a very fit and athletic young woman, but had an accident ten years ago that damaged her internal organs, her pancreas being one so she was a type 1 diabetic. She should really really have quit then, but as she became less able to farm, and less able to enjoy a night out etc, she relied on her ciggerettes and her excuse was she loved to smoke. I used to say lets quit together, and she would say NO, but then later she would say really I have to quit , just not today. I was six months off last may, and she was so happy for me and told me ok I will give it a shot and got a prescription for champix, that was a big move for her believe me. She was building her courage to start taking it, However she fell, broke her pelvis and ended up in hospital, forced to stop smoking while in a miserable situation, I got her e cig to help her through that. She insisted on being released from hospital too soon, yes it was so she could recover and smoke in the comfort of her own home, sadly it was a bad move she had picked up an infection in hospital, when she got home it got worse, in three days she was back in hospital, the infection had really taken over her body, she was admitted to intensive care and was on a ventilator for four days , she died of multi organ failure. She was fifty three, not an old woman, . She wasn't stupid, she knew that smoking killed, she just thought it wouldn't catch her YET. Her smoking had left her body so open to that infection , that on top of her diabetes, . So while I understand REX posting that if we hadn't decided to quit , it might be us outside that hospital, ( and they have all my sympathy poor things). I also understand the addict can't be forced to give up, they need encouragement and help not thou shalt not smoke. I also feel pretty dumb , because what did I do as my sister was struggling for life and I was in that hospital all day every day for four days? I smoked, yup, I did. I promised myself it was only one or two, but here I am six months later on my second quit, this one is easier for some reason, It is like every time I get a craving I think of her desire not to be addicted, and just ignore it. So on day four it is going ok,.;)

  • Haze, I hope your sister can find it in her to quit. I know most people who smoke and tell us they enjoy their smoke, or it is all they have, or they don't want to quit. Really do want to quit , they say they will at some point but are afraid to quit, they just keep putting it off.

    I know this I was there, I would attempt and fail , and to be honest my first few fails were due to not being really ready in my own head. Last time well it was a factor of things, and I am now back, and I was afraid like lou to actually make the attempt, so far so good.

    Haze like your sister my sister was ill, and smoked like a train. She was a very fit and athletic young woman, but had an accident ten years ago that damaged her internal organs, her pancreas being one so she was a type 1 diabetic. She should really really have quit then, but as she became less able to farm, and less able to enjoy a night out etc, she relied on her ciggerettes and her excuse was she loved to smoke. I used to say lets quit together, and she would say NO, but then later she would say really I have to quit , just not today. I was six months off last may, and she was so happy for me and told me ok I will give it a shot and got a prescription for champix, that was a big move for her believe me. She was building her courage to start taking it, However she fell, broke her pelvis and ended up in hospital, forced to stop smoking while in a miserable situation, I got her e cig to help her through that. She insisted on being released from hospital too soon, yes it was so she could recover and smoke in the comfort of her own home, sadly it was a bad move she had picked up an infection in hospital, when she got home it got worse, in three days she was back in hospital, the infection had really taken over her body, she was admitted to intensive care and was on a ventilator for four days , she died of multi organ failure. She was fifty three, not an old woman, . She wasn't stupid, she knew that smoking killed, she just thought it wouldn't catch her YET. Her smoking had left her body so open to that infection , that on top of her diabetes, . So while I understand REX posting that if we hadn't decided to quit , it might be us outside that hospital, ( and they have all my sympathy poor things). I also understand the addict can't be forced to give up, they need encouragement and help not thou shalt not smoke. I also feel pretty dumb , because what did I do as my sister was struggling for life and I was in that hospital all day every day for four days? I smoked, yup, I did. I promised myself it was only one or two, but here I am six months later on my second quit, this one is easier for some reason, It is like every time I get a craving I think of her desire not to be addicted, and just ignore it. So on day four it is going ok,.;)

    Thanks very much for the reply, I appreciate it. I do hope my sister quits and soon, because her Emphysema is really bad and getting worse, she can hardly breath at times. The winter is particularly bad for her it makes it worse. She has lost 3.5 stone in the last 9 months and is a pitiful sight, it breaks my heart and I am scared that she will die. Her diagnosis strangely enough was the catalyst for my quit. Thanks again for you concern.xxx

  • Great post folks, thank you soo much for sharing your stories!

    Really needed this today xx

  • mrsMash09

    I am really glad the post was of some help to you today, because after all the was my original intension! It was trying to reinforce anyone who may have been wavering in their quit although obviously I did it in a ham fisted way judging by the reaction for which I apologise. So to all my non-smoking friends have a wonderful day,and to anyone on the verge of quitting I advise you to use this forum as much as you can, because if anything it is very lively and encouraging. PEACE

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