Low-Carb High-Fat (LCHF)
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Dr. Peter Attia describes the mental and physical benefits of a low-carb (ketosis) diet through his personal experience and experimentation

In this video Dr. Peter Attia gives a testimony about his transition to low carb eating, some of the reasoning behind it, and how it effects his mental and physical performance.

I've also felt the mental effects that he describes around focus, but that was mostly in a fasting state (e.g. ketosis brought on through starvation). Likewise with physical performance (fasted for 24 hours and played intense basketball with no negative side-effects).

Have you felt either the physical or mental benefits of being in deep ketosis?

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Being your quest is to live longer- healthier- better--- This may be of interest to you:

bluezones.com/

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So far, I filled in the life expectancy then it tried to get me to register, waffles (high-glycaemic?) so to give the benefit of the doubt I tried to access recipes, page isn't working.

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Yeah, I just tried it from my phone and same thing.......sorry. Google- blue zones and it should be first or second on the results-

or try these hope they work...it's so worth your time! I'm strong advocate for BlueZone based living:

bluezones.com/recipes/

bluezones.com/live-longer-b...

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Awesome. Thanks. I've actually come a long way in my learning over these last 10 months and am less of an advocate low-carb than I was. I'm much more in line with what you've posted there (I haven't actually visited the links, but am aware of the blue zone ideas). I now am closer in thinking to what Dr. Walter Longo advocates and just finished an experimental 5 day fast mimicking diet. I'll try to write a post about it all at some point!

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Interesting- look forward to reading your post. Personally, I'm not an advocated of fasting- unless it's a 24-48 hour fast to shock the bod. But I also feel there are some benefits to cleansing the body through fasting- but depends on the fast and the circumstances.

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Vegan isn't naturally healthy because of B12 requirements. I finally found a recipes tab, but not the waffles?

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Blue Zones is not a full vegan way of living- the people in the Blue Zones follow a way of life that includes some meat- but lean, naturally raised animals, no chemicals-no steroids- no hormones- no GMO, it makes a HUGE difference. we are not designed as human beings to consume meat everyday- we just don't need it- it becomes one of the many poisons that make us fat and unhealthy-

I hope that you will watch the bluezones videos- it's worth your time!

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Some of it is good, and I take on board that we don't need lots of protein for example. However, the Perfect Health Diet describes that the optimal amount of carbohydrate is reached when we don't have a deficit that needs to be made up from the other macro-nutrients, and we don't have an excess that is then converted to fat. For most people that is between 120 and 160g per day. Unless I was starving, the proportions advised by the Blue Zone site would be well out.

I know the Kitavans have 21% fat at one extreme, but the other extreme would be the Inuits with only 5% carbs. The optimal will be somewhere between.

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Additionally, it also depends on body size-and make up- what is good for one is not good for all. It's subjective to a degree, however- as a general rule- the Blue Zones is a great place to be, the data backs it up- there is of course the need to follow an equally important requirement to healthy living and longevity and that is religiously being on a path of movement each day- at least 3 miles or one hour of moving enough that the heart and body is in constant motion and you are breathing heavy- sweating and putting pressure on the muscles- hiking hills for example.

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Ah, now you see, I go by the science on this. Ken Cooper established that a training effect for the heart is elicited from only 10 minutes training @ 150+ beats per minute, or 20 minutes @ 140 bpm, or 45 minutes @ 130+ bpm, and so on.

Nearly two years ago I had a CT scan that confirmed I have no calcification of the heart at all in my early fifties. Must be doing something right.

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Two Documentaries if you haven't already watched them:

Food Matters and Fork over Knifes

And the book: " The Deepest Well" by Nadine Burke Harris- ( I read your introduction) - my mom had a triple bypass surgery at 44! She now has diabetes, high blood pressure, glaucoma, arthritis-depression- anxiety- uggghhhh it's awful-

The book is largely about Child Adversity and unexplained health issues in Adults-

Which is helping understand my mom and her entire side of the family- which includes overweight (obese)-diabetes-death from alcoholism-a lot of major dysfunction.

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I've seen the films, but not the book.

Have you heard of Dr. Kraft, who said those with atherosclerosis and without diabetes are just undiagnosed? When we recognise that diabetes is the extreme of insulin-resistance, I believe he was onto something.

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I left out heart disease--

No I not heard of Dr. Kraft- but will google and bookmark for later reading- thanks

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Ok, so are you implying that 10 minutes of training @ 150+ BPM is acceptable "sole" form of training for the heart? if done daily?

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Even then, circadian rhythm dictates that at least 24.2 hours recovery is necessary after a training session.

A minimum of two minutes warm-up is advised.

Experience has taught me that the maximum period between sessions is about four and a half days (based on my weight-training, which is much more precise as a measure).

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ok- so I disagree on that-

while yes, the heart does benefit from the numbers described by Ken Cooper- HIIT workouts are a perfect example- 24 minutes of high intensity, but there needs to be a variation- such as but not limited to, longer but less intense workouts- and workouts that involve sitting - as in sitting with friends at happy hour (could be drinking bubbly water with lemon or red wine) and laughter, love, the feelings it needs to have to balance it out. You may think I sound crazy by referencing happy hour with friends as a "heart" workout- but I am convinced it is just a necessary as the others.

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No, you're not crazy. Life has to be looked at holistically.

Children that are neglected can die of the stress caused. Physiologically, stress relates to high insulin levels too, the stress hormones causing a rise in blood glucose for fight or flight that then has to be normalised.

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Exactly! You got it. You will definitely appreciate and resonate with "the deepest well" I'll send it to you when I am done if you like.

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