Operation when on oxygen: Has anyone... - British Lung Foun...

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Operation when on oxygen

carolg1
carolg1

Has anyone had an operation when on oxygen why am I being told I cannot have an operation because I’m on oxygen I’m on 2L 24/7 any advice please xx

30 Replies
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Hello carolg1 ,

How have you been? 😁 When I was on oxygen I had to have a deviated septum corrected and one or two things done in my nasal cavity. It usually involves the patient being put under general anaesthesia. But because my lungs were quite weak it was deemed too risky to put me under. So they gave me a sedative and pain meds and forged ahead. Not something I'd like to do again 😑 . We are at a higher risk of respiratory failure. Your anaesthetist or doctor should have explained this to you.

What procedure are you in need of? xx ☘️

carolg1
carolg1
in reply to Caspiana

Hi caspina lovely of you to reply, I’m going through a really tough time at the moment with the amount of mucus being generated and strangely enough it feels like it’s all coming from my sinuses and flooding my chest and diaphragm there’s certainly something going on with the back of my nose it’s like I’m drowning at times, because of this my quality of life is awful it’s zero but. I was told if any surgery was required it would be too risky , fighting to breathe five hours a day is risky so I say it’s my choice surely xx

Caspiana
Caspiana
in reply to carolg1

Hello again 😊 Did you consult with a otorhinolaryngologist? If it's a sinus surgery you can do it under local. Depending on what it is .

carolg1
carolg1
in reply to Caspiana

Hi caspina, I’m not sure what’s going on with my nose yet following a massive nose bleed whereas huge clots of blood with fingers coming from them I literally had to pull them from down my nose and from the back of my nose it was horrendous the clots were dark blood so obviously been wherever they had come from for a while, they cauterised my nose since then which is three months ago I’m still having trouble clearing my left Rosario and I can feels something that is not right the ent consultant just keeps telling me to do a nasal rinse four and five times a day, my nose is cleaner but it’s still not right and since this incident my breathing has got so much worse as if it’s because of blockages deep at the back of my nose, I’m going to ask for a second opinion xx

Caspiana
Caspiana
in reply to carolg1

I think you need a second opinion Carol. It's not good enough to tell you to do nasal rinses. Can you see another doctor? Thus sounds horrendous. xx 😔

powderpuff
powderpuff
in reply to carolg1

The ‘fingers’ are nasal Polyps. My son had exactly the same symptoms with resulting surgery a year ago & feels he has a new nose since! The nasal rinses are used to try & shrink the Polyps but don’t work long term.

carolg1
carolg1
in reply to powderpuff

Hi thanks for replying how old is your son the clots were the size of an adult hand with long strands coming off it like tentacles came down my nose and from the back of my throat it was so scary I literally nearly choked what did the say caused this xx

powderpuff
powderpuff
in reply to carolg1

OMG, how horrendous for you Carol. My sons symptoms were bad enough but nothing quite like yours.

My son was 44 when he had the surgery which resulted from chronic Sinusitis. He also has quite debilitating Hay fever which could never be treated successfully & always caused terrible infections where his nose would swell to almost double the normal size.

Caspiana
Caspiana
in reply to powderpuff

Awful powderpuff . But I'm glad the surgery has helped. xx

Caspiana
Caspiana
in reply to carolg1

😱 Oh my. I just about almost could feel what you were describing. 😑

This is strange. As, most people are placed on oxygen when they have surgery.

I would get a second opinion, especially, if the surgery would help you.

Take good care💐💐💞

Caspiana
Caspiana
in reply to megshafer

Please see the info below Meg 😊

megshafer
megshafer
in reply to Caspiana

Thanks Cas....for the information. 💞💞💞💞

Caspiana
Caspiana
in reply to megshafer

❤️

megshafer
megshafer
in reply to Caspiana

XO❤🌹🌹

For your information:

Surgery Risks for COPD Patients

By Deborah Leader, RN Medically reviewed by Jenny A. Dhingra, MD Updated on February 10, 2020

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) increases the chances of surgical complications, such as infections and respiratory crises. In fact, long-term survival rates for people with severe COPD who have surgery are lower than that of people who do not have COPD.1 Given this, a pre-operative evaluation that screens for lung disease is done in preparation for any surgical procedure.

If you have signs of COPD, you will need further pulmonary tests, and your surgical plan may require modifications. Early identification of risks, preoperative optimization, and appropriate anesthesia management can help improve your chances for a good outcome and healthy recovery.

But if your lungs are severely impaired, the cons of surgery may outweigh the pros, and your doctors may recommend that you avoid having the procedure altogether.

Operative Risks

With COPD, you could have a pulmonary problem during your procedure. Operative pulmonary issues associated with COPD can cause a respiratory emergency or may be life-threatening.

Your lung and heart function will be closely monitored during your procedure. Most problems can be detected and managed immediately. However, respiratory events during surgery can cause lasting problems if organs become deprived of oxygen before it can be corrected.2

Surgical risks when you have COPD include:

Bronchospasm: Sudden narrowing of the airways, which can happen with COPD, can prevent oxygen from getting into the lungs.

V/Q mismatch: With COPD, a mismatch between blood flow and airflow in the lungs can lead to low oxygen absorption into the body. During surgery, hemodynamic (blood vessel and heart) changes can exacerbate this problem.

Mucus plugs: Mucus often builds up in COPD. A period with diminished coughing and without effortful breathing can make the effects worse during your procedure.

Pneumothorax (collapsed lung): Lung disease increases the risk of a collapsed lung due to deterioration in lung structure. During surgery, air pressure due to mechanical ventilation can further increase this risk.

Thanks for this information, Caspiana. And carolg1, I hope you can get some relief soon.

👋😊

Yatzy
Yatzy
in reply to Caspiana

Very useful information, thanks Cas. I’m waiting for surgery and the next step is the anaesthetist’s decision on how we go ahead. I don’t have what’s diagnosed as COPD, but I have sensitive and dodgy lungs due to asthma and chemical triggers, so I’m hoping for the best. This analysis helps me to understand the risks.

Caspiana
Caspiana
in reply to Yatzy

I hope they find the best way for you Izb1 . I was under the impression you already had your op, is this another one? 😞 xx ☕🍰

Yatzy
Yatzy
in reply to Caspiana

No not me, Cas, I’m still waiting for mine. Love Yatzy aka Penny 🦋 xx

Sharp5Flat13
Sharp5Flat13
in reply to Yatzy

Asthma is considered an “obstructive”disease, where (like emphysema) you can’t get air out. As opposed to a “restrictive” disease where you have trouble getting air in, e.g., pulmonary fibrosis. Our respiratory therapist speaks with us before our rehabilitation exercises. He challenges us with questions twice weekly. I like him because he always reminds us he’s not a pulmologist, so an MD would have better answers. They say that people who humble themselves in such a manner, are more intelligent than those that don’t. Any rate, hope you’re surgery goes well, Yatzy!

Yatzy
Yatzy
in reply to Sharp5Flat13

That’s interesting, S5F13, Thanks! I had a strange reaction after a general anaesthetic once, about ten years ago, so as well as my breathing issues, they’re trying to decide if there’s any further risk. They’re thinking it might have been the erythromycin I was taking at the same time, not the anaesthetic, that caused the problems, but a bit scary approaching another. 🤞

Caspiana
Caspiana
in reply to Yatzy

Sorry Yatzy , I'm such a scatterbrained thing nowadays. I am sure they will work something out to suit you. xx 😊👋❤️

It is over 2 years since I had breast cancer, a rare tumour that does not respond to chemo or hormone treatment. Radiotherapy.it was said to be unadvisable due to my lung condition. As it was said to be slow growing I was given the option after consultations with a group of specialists offered to leave it be or have a mastectomy under local anaesthetic which could not be pain free. I chose the op , not pleasant but am so grateful to the surgeon at Tameside Hospital , and staff who looked after me. Hope your condition clears up without surgery , but would ask about the possibility of local.

Most people with lung problems have to be monitored more carefully during operations, some can as said be done with local aneasethic. I have COPD/Asthma and have undergone surgical proceedures with just oxygen administered . But I do not use oxygen otherwise so cannot comment on the rights & wrongs for you only the consultant can decide whether the risks are too great in your case. This is because you may be prepared to accept the risk but the surgeon may not want to take the risk of complications ect. Every best wish if they do go ahead for a save recovery and better feelings inside for yourself.

I had an accident on my mobility scooter and broke my elbow, the anesthetist spoke to both my husband and myself telling us I may not pull through but I decided I would risk it as my arm was useless without it. I still have some restriction to my arm (I think they might have done a quick job) but I have an arm I can use. The worst part was the chest infection afterwards and the four weeks stay in hospital over Christmas! Keep smiling x

I'm on oxygen all the time and a brilliant young surgeon put me under a general anaesthetic to insert two valves. No problem.

Catnip

I have a nasal cyst that can only be removed by operation. I looked into Dr Google and basically surgery is a temp cure and problem usually returns within a year. So I opted to irrigate using neti pot. It has reduced in size on last CT scan and my breathing is better. I add either a couple drops of oil of oregano (use high quality) or a teaspoon of Manuka honey (medical grade). With Manuka you need to let neti pot drip out in drops real slow so it is in longer contact with the bacteria. Maybe holistic is a decent option?

I have had surgery I a on 4 leaders they put you in. Twilight this last time I'm on 6 liters they just gave me enough pain meds to barely feel it. So yes it can be done I only have 28% of my lungs now I have to keep having colonoscopys because of my bleeding problems each time is more risky then the last. But they put me in a twilight and I don't know anything until I'm in recovery. I put it all in Gods hands.

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